Announcement of Native American Journalism Fellows

June 20, 2022

Montana Loans

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Seven students have been selected by the Native American Journalists Association (NAJA) to participate in the Native American Journalism Fellowship (NAJF). Each of these students is currently enrolled in colleges and universities across the country.

This class of 2022 scholars will be able to participate in a virtual program while receiving three hours of college credit at their respective universities. There are five mentors that students will work closely with throughout the duration of this scholarship. Each of these five mentors represents four different branches of journalism: broadcast, radio, print and digital media.

Students will have the opportunity to pitch stories to news outlets and will also have the opportunity to participate in the National Indigenous Media Conference where they can meet and network with other Indigenous journalists.

The NAJF Class of 2022

Lyric Aquino (Tewa) – New York University

Grace Benally (Navajo) – Arizona State University

Valentin Contreras (Pala Band of Mission Indians and IIPAY Nation of Santa Ysabel)

California State University

Carrie Lynn Johnson (Chickasaw and Pawnee) – Austin College

McKayla Lee (Navajo) – University of Montana

Lindsay McCoy (Sault Ste Marie Tribe of Chippewa) – Michigan State University

Priscilla Wolf (Cree) – University of Regina

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About the Author

Neely Bardwell
Author: Neely BardwellE-mail: This email address is protected from spam. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Neely Bardwell (descendant of the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indian), who started as an intern at Native News Online in the summer of 2021, is a freelance writer. Bardwell is a student at Michigan State University where she majored in politics and minored in Native American studies.


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New developments aim to ease Bozeman’s affordable housing crisis

June 20, 2022

Montana Lending

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The Perennial Park development recently opened behind Lowe’s just off North 19th Ave. (Frank Eltman/MTFP)

BOZEMAN — The first time Anna Stone met “Randy” in 2019, he was sleeping under a bridge. She recalled that he seemed to have psychological problems and was not interested in help from a stranger. Their introduction did not go well.

They met again in May 2020 when Stone, the housing case coordinator at the Human Resources Development Council, found him at a hotel for people over 65 who might be vulnerable to COVID-19.

“Randy,” who didn’t want his full name used for this story, slowly built a relationship of trust with Stone, who for two years worked with him to transition from homelessness.

Il sera bientôt le dernier résident à emménager dans un nouveau lotissement de 96 logements fondés sur le revenu pour adultes de plus de 55 ans appelé Perennial Park. This is the last effort of those responsible to put at least a small breach in the emerging problem of affordable housing in the region.

“Knowing that last summer he was sleeping on the floor in Lindley Park and that this summer he’s going to be in an air-conditioned room with [donated]

Depuis fin avril, des camions de déménagement déchargent les affaires des nouveaux arrivants au parc Perennial, situé derrière Lowe’s juste à côté de la 19e avenue nord à Bozeman. It is part of a larger development which includes the adjacent Arrowleaf project of 136 units, which is oriented towards families.

Also on the property are what turned out to be two key components of the $69 million project needed for Seattle-based developer GMD Development to comply with city zoning regulations.

The Community Health Partners building at the entrance to the property will provide medical, dental and mental health clinics, as well as a pharmacy, to residents of the Bozeman area. On the other side, Family Promise offers early childhood learning.

Residents of Perennial Park and Arrowleaf must meet income criteria below 60% of the region’s median income: $41,760 for an individual and $59,640 for a family of four.

In a city where one-bedroom apartments typically rent for nearly $2,000, eligible residents of Perennial Park apartments pay $1,119 for a one-bedroom apartment; $1,342 for two bedrooms; and $1,551 for a three-bedroom, said HRDC associate director Tracy Menuez.

Menuez said the people who need affordable housing the most are “the people who feed Bozeman.” Elle a noté que la plus récente évaluation régionale des besoins en logement a déterminé que le comté de Gallatin avait besoin de 6 000 unités supplémentaires.

“If you want to go out to dinner, they work in the restaurant. If you want to go to the house supplies store, it is the people who work at the counter, working the floor, “she said. “My God, these are the people who teach your children.”

In addition to access to childcare and health services, the development is within walking distance of a supermarket and other retail outlets and restaurants along a busy stretch of 19th Avenue. .

“J’adore ça”, a déclaré Bonnie Budd, une brigadière scolaire à la retraite et sauveteuse qui déplaçait ses affaires d’un camion U-Haul un matin récent. “New people are moving in and I can’t wait to have a whole new life.”

Bozeman Deputy Mayor Terry Cunningham said the development was made possible through the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development’s low-income tax credit scheme. Le programme fournit des subventions fédérales aux promoteurs en échange d’une garantie qu’ils maintiendront les loyers en dessous de 60% du revenu médian de la région.

He also recognized an acute need for affordable housing in Bozeman.

“Chaque jour, vous entendez des histoires de gens qui disent:” J’adorerais être ici, c’est ma ville de prédilection et, malheureusement, le marché du logement n’est pas celui que je peux gérer. “”

Cunningham said these feelings are “heartbreaking for anyone, especially for people who care about the city”.

The city contributed $500,000 from its community housing fund to help complete the project, Cunningham said. He said the 232 units in the two developments provide affordable housing for 400 to 500 people.

“Nous perdons des logements abordables chaque fois qu’un parc de maisons mobiles est démoli, chaque fois qu’une subvention du HUD expire”, a-t-il déclaré. “So being able to say, ‘Boom, here’s 232 units that can solve the problems of 400 to 500 people’, you know, that’s huge.”

Seattle-based GMD Development partner Steve Dymoke said his firm relied exclusively on the low-income tax credit system to develop projects like the Arrowhead/Perennial Park property.

Il a déclaré que la société avait développé le projet Larkspur Commons à Bozeman il y a plusieurs années et venait récemment de clôturer son 10e projet dans le Montana. GMD has also developed affordable housing projects in Alaska, Washington and Idaho.

He said the $500,000 Bozeman donated for the Arrowhead/Perennial Park project was a key factor.

“You know, it may seem like a small percentage, but it plays an outsized role in feasibility,” he said. «Cela a vraiment conclu l’affaire, et au-delà de cela, cela signale vraiment à nos investisseurs, nos prêteurs, que la ville s’engage en quelque sorte à la soutenir financièrement. That’s a really strong vote of support.”

Dymoke praised Bozeman’s Rotherham Construction, which was responsible for building the complex. He said that despite COVID-19 challenges and supply chain issues, Rotherham “really managed to deliver on time overall. It’s really been impressive.”

Although residents are moving forward since the end of April, Dymoke said that a major opening celebration is scheduled for the site on June 8.

“If you had three wishes from the Affordable Housing Genius, this would be at the top of your wish list,” Cunningham said. “I can’t think of a project that has met so many community needs in one project. It’s really unique.

MT lawmakers debate raising movie tax credit; supporters say it boosts local businesses |

June 19, 2022

Montana Economy

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Kevin Costner was photographed this week browsing Scheels, a sporting goods store in Missoula, as lawmakers in Helena debated whether to extend and increase a tax credit intended to attract movie moguls like him in the state in the future.

On Friday, the Montana Legislature’s Interim Revenue Committee heard a presentation on the economic impact of Montana’s MEDIA Act tax credits. The law, signed into law in 2019, essentially broke even in terms of the revenue it brought in to the state government. Indeed, while the state distributed approximately $20.3 million in tax credits to film production companies, the state tax revenue generated by all film production companies and their expenses was approximately $20.3 million.

The Montana MEDIA Act tax credit was established by the state legislature in 2019 with a cap of $10 million, then expanded to a total cap of $12 million beginning in the tax year 2022. Because this is an incentive for production companies to film in Montana, eligible companies can get a 20% transferable income tax credit for production and compensation expenses during its stay in the state. Businesses can also earn additional credit for reaching various other thresholds.

An economic impact consultant gave a presentation showing how 195 different productions have shot in Montana since the law was created and spent $192 million in the state. Film industry advocates have urged the committee to consider raising the cap to between $50 million and $150 million to allow Montana to compete with other states. They say it’s necessary to encourage the growth of the industry, which they say supports Montana businesses, creates local jobs and doesn’t pollute the state’s precious outdoor spaces.

Two Republican members of the committee, Sen. Greg Hertz and Sen. Mike Lang, both expressed support for the idea of ​​at least possibly introducing a bill in the next session to raise the cap.

“It’s a tough industry,” Hertz said. “There is a lot of competition across the United States. It’s a good clean industry. It helps Montana, it helps a lot of rural communities. The question here is how do we continue to nurture this industry without becoming too excessive and having a big impact on our cash flow? »

Hertz said he believes lawmakers need to look into the matter and the cap may merit further increases.

Senator Brian Hoven, also a Republican, said he opposed the tax credit because the amount of tax revenue generated for the state by the only film companies that used the tax credit was only $7. .8 million. So, according to him, the state is losing money because the tax credit cost it $20.3 million.

“I think the film industry is very glamorous,” he said. “Movie stars are there, they show up, they bring people to rural communities, there’s a lot of money. It’s exciting, it’s great. But unfortunately, it does not bring money to the public treasury.

Hoven said he read articles in the Wall Street Journal that prove movie tax credits are unprofitable. Hoven said the director of the state Department of Revenue under former Gov. Steve Bullock insisted on having a cap on credit because he “knew it would be a drain on the treasury.”

“To invest in this, we pick winners and losers,” Hoven said. “When we start giving to the film industry, we choose them to win.”

However, the impact on state coffers is not a complete picture of the impact of film production on Montana’s economy. A report from the University of Montana found that a single season of Costner’s hit show “Yellowstone” brought in an additional $70 million to the state economy in one year.

Gina Lavery, a consultant hired by the state to analyze the impact of the movie tax credit, said the movie industry has a big “ripple effect” on rural communities and small businesses in Montana. That’s because highly paid staffers at production companies like Paramount Network, which shoots “Yellowstone” in Missoula and Ravalli counties, spend money even on days off.

Lavery also said that not raising the credit cap has hampered Montana’s economic growth and may continue to do so in the future.

She noted that a film production company was willing to build a $20 million studio in Missoula, but backed down when the legislature only raised the cap by $2 million last session.

“This type of investment, just the initial construction, would have generated $34 million for the state and $1.3 million in tax revenue for local jurisdictions and the state,” Lavery explained.

Allison Whitmer of the Montana Film Office said “Yellowstone” is currently filming its fifth season here and will likely film most of its sixth season in Montana. Combined with Paramount filming a new show called “1932” in Butte next year, Whitmer said those two shows alone will spend an estimated $50 million to $100 million in Montana over the next two years.

Hertz concluded that he thinks the Legislature should consider gradually increasing the cap, and he also noted that there may be ways to ensure it benefits rural communities in Montana. Utah, for example, has a film tax credit that only applies if companies shoot in small, rural towns.

The full presentation and discussion can be found fast forward to 10:25 a.m. online at bit.ly/3y0V1qc.

50 years of faltering progress in the United States – Hartford Courant

June 18, 2022

Montana Loans

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A timeline of key events before, during, and after the passage in 1972 of the landmark U.S. law known as Title IX:

1836: Georgia Women’s College is the first women’s college to open in the United States

1917: Jeannette Rankin of Montana becomes the first woman elected to Congress.

1920: american women win the right to vote.

1936: A federal appeals court actually says doctors can prescribe birth control to women.

1947: The first report of the Truman Commission calls for more equitable access to higher education, including an end to racial and religious discrimination.

1953: Toni Stone becomes the first woman to regularly play professional baseball (Negro Leagues).

1954: US Supreme Court says ‘separate educational institutions are inherently unequal’ in landmark Brown v. Board of Education of the Topeka decision.

1960: Wilma Rudolph becomes the first American woman to win three Olympic gold medals. The black sprinter star becomes a prominent civil rights activist.

1963: The Commission on the Status of Women, led by Eleanor Roosevelt, finds widespread discrimination against women in the United States and urges federal courts that “the principle of equality be firmly established in constitutional doctrine” . Congress passes Equal Pay Act.

1964: The Civil Rights Act includes sex as one of the things employers cannot discriminate against. It also establishes the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Hawaii’s Patsy Mink becomes first woman of color elected to U.S. House; she then co-authored Title IX, the Early Childhood Education Act and the Equal Women in Education Act.

1965: The Elementary and Secondary Education Act provides federal funding to K-12 schools with low-income student populations. President Lyndon Johnson also signs the Higher Education Act of 1965 which gives students access to loans, scholarships and other programs.

1966: The National Women’s Organization is established, calling for women to have “full participation in mainstream American society…in a truly equal partnership with men.”

1967: Aretha Franklin covers Otis Redding’s 1965 hit, “Respect, ” and it quickly becomes a feminist anthem.

1969: New York Democrat Shirley Chisholm becomes the first black woman in Congress. She later becomes the first woman to seek the presidential nomination.

1971: The Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women (AIAW) is founded to govern collegiate women’s athletics and administer national championships.

1972: Congress passes Title IX, which is enacted by President Richard Nixon. Title IX states: “No person in the United States shall, because of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied benefits, or be discriminated against in connection with any program or activity of education with federal financial assistance.” Congress also passes the Equal Rights Amendment, but it never gets the 38 state approval needed to become law.

1973: The Supreme Court renders its opinion Roe v. Wade establishing the right to abortion. Billie Jean King defeats Bobby Riggs in straight sets in “The Battle of the Sexes” tennis exhibition match.

1974: The Women’s Education Equity Act provides grants and contracts to help with “gender-neutral programs,” as well as to help institutions meet Title IX requirements.

1975: President Gerald Ford signs Title IX Athletics Regulationswhich gives athletics departments up to three years to implement, after noting that “it was the intention of Congress, for whatever reason for interpretation, to include athletics.”

1976: The NCAA challenges the legality of Title IX regarding athletics in a lawsuit that is dismissed two years later.

1977: Three female Yale students, two graduates and one male faculty member become the first to sue for sexual harassment under Title IX (Alexander v. Yale). He would fail on appeal.

1979: Ann Meyers becomes the first woman to sign an NBA contract (Indiana Pacers, $500,000). She had been the first woman to receive a basketball scholarship from UCLA.

1979: US officials have implemented the important three-pronged test for Title IX compliance in athletics.

1980: Oversight of Title IX is performed by the Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights.

nineteen eighty one : Sandra Day O’Connor becomes the first woman appointed to the United States Supreme Court.

1982: Louisiana Tech defeats Cheyney State for the first NCAA women’s basketball title. Two months later, the AIAW folded, placing top women’s collegiate sports entirely under the umbrella of the NCAA. Cheryl Miller scores 105 points in a high school game for launch one of the greatest careers in basketball history.

1984: Democrat Geraldine Ferraro becomes the first woman to earn a vice-presidential nomination from a major political party. The United States wins its first Olympic gold medal in women’s basketball.

1987: Pat Summitt wins first of eight national women’s basketball titles at Tennessee.

1988: Congress overturns President Ronald Reagan’s veto of the Civil Rights Restoration Act of 1987, mandating the application of Title IX to any school receiving federal funds.

1994: The Athletics Equity Disclosure Act is passed. Under Title IX, schools with federal financial aid and athletics programs must provide annual gender equity information, including roster sizes and certain budgets.

1995: Connecticut wins first of 11 national titles under coach Geno Auriemma.

1996: The female athletes win a lawsuit and force Brown to restore funding for women’s gymnastics and volleyball after saying the school violated Title IX by turning both teams into donor-funded entities. The NBA clears the way for the Women’s National Basketball Association to begin play the following year.

1999: Brandi Chastain penalty gives USA victory over China in the World Cup final, reinvigorating women’s sport in the United States

2001: Ashley Martin becomes the first woman to play and score in a Division I football game as a placekicker for Jacksonville State.

2008: Danica Patrick wins the Japan 300 to become the first female winner at the highest level of American open-wheel racing.

2014 : Becky Hamon becomes the first full-time assistant coach in NBA history.

2015 : United States’ 5-2 victory against Japan in the final of the Women’s World Cup became the most-watched football game in American television history.

2016: Citing Title IX, the Obama administration says transgender students in public schools should be allowed to use the bathroom or locker room that matches their gender identity, the advice has been cancelled by the Trump administration. hillary clinton becomes the first woman to win a major party nomination for president.

2017: Serena Williams wins her 23rd Grand Slam titlesecond all time.

2020: New Amendments to Title IX take effect, mainly with regard to sexual harassment.

2021: Report tears NCAA apart for failing to live up to commitment to gender equality prioritizing its lucrative Division I men’s basketball tournament “above all else,” including the women’s championships.

2022: Dawn Staley of South Carolina becomes the first black Division I basketball coach, male or female, to win more than one national championship. The United States women’s national soccer team reaches a stage agreement to be paid equally to the men’s national team.

Montana budget on ‘high sugar,’ but expected revenue cuts | State

June 17, 2022

Montana Economy

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Illustration of money (Pxhere.com | Public domain images).

On a “high sugar,” the state of Montana should have plenty of extra cash in store by the start of the 2025 biennium, but revenues are volatile and a shortfall is already forecast for the fight against fires.

At the end of the 2021 legislative session, the closing fund balance was expected to be $157.2 million higher than the operating reserve at the start of the 2025 biennium, but this figure is expected to reach $1.7 billion. dollars, according to a forecast this week from Parliament. Tax Division of the Montana Legislature.

“We probably shouldn’t think about spending it right now because it’s too unpredictable,” Rep. Mary Caferro, D-Helena, said at the meeting.

At a joint meeting of the Legislative Finance Committee and the Interim Revenue Committee, tax analysts presented the outlook for the 2025 biennium ahead of the next legislature. At the meeting and in their report, they warned that it was difficult to make projections given the unpredictable rates of inflation, uncertain demographic trends and changes in labor economics, such as higher wages. and lower labor force participation.

“Strong collections offer a secure start to the 2025 biennial budget process, but economic uncertainty clouds the future,” reads the budget outlook.

Firefighting costs are rising

On the expense side, however, the cost of firefighting has increased and is expected to continue, according to the outlook. The report estimates that the average cost of wildfire suppression has increased by 31%, from $22.3 million per year to $29.2 million per year over the span of a decade.

The report also notes that while the Department of Natural Resources and Conservation is effective against fires, suppressing 96% of burns under 10 acres over the past decade, those that grow ‘account for most of the expense’. .

Going forward, costs are expected to increase given longer fire seasons and higher costs for labor, fuel and supplies, as well as “an increasing number of large fires”, according to the report. The state sets a formula in law for its fire suppression fund, and based on the last 10 years of average income and expenses, Montana could see a shortfall of $14.2 million for the biennial. , and with extreme fires, a shortfall of up to $81.4 million, the report says.


Montana receives major disaster declaration from President Joe Biden


Helena Area Habitat for Humanity is looking to send volunteers to help clean up after flooding at Red Lodge

Revenues fall in advance

At the meeting, at least a few people called the state budget “high sugar,” and one presenter said every other state was in the same boat. The outlook indicates that the large sums of money in savings are due to the federally stimulated economy and a strong stock market in 2021 as well as inflation, but the tide is likely to turn.

“Projected revenue for fiscal 2023 is expected to fall at least 10% but possibly as much as 20% from fiscal 2022,” the report said. “This represents a reduction of $347 million – $721 million in general fund revenue in just one year.”

However, legislative budget analyst and divisional director Amy Carlson warned lawmakers that the possible 20% drop was an alternative estimate and that the drop could be steeper.

“It shouldn’t be considered the worst case scenario,” Carlson said. “It’s just another forecast at the moment.”

The report also says that recent years of high earnings “provide a cushion to absorb the extreme volatility expected in fiscal 2023.”

Cloud forecast

The outlook was dire for staff, who face more financial uncertainties than usual, Carlson said. For example, she said a market forecast indicates that inflation, at around 8%, will slow in fiscal 2023, but that’s not a long-term datum.

“Clearly the Federal Reserve is doing what it can to moderate inflation, and only time will tell if it’s successful,” Carlson said.

She also said this week’s analysis was by no means refined and that lawmakers would receive more budget information in the fall, before the 2023 legislature. She also said her staff generally takes the presentation budget on the road to Montana.

The post-Montana budget on a “high sugar,” but planned revenue cuts appeared first on Daily Montanan.

FAU Study: New England States Lead in Lawyer Discipline | Your money

June 17, 2022

Montana Lending

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BOCA RATON Florida, June 17, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The New England states of New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Vermont lead the 50 states in lawyer discipline, devoting more resources to processing and to the resolution of wrongdoing complaints, according to a study by researchers at Florida Atlantic University.

The study, published in The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, also found that Alabama, New York, and Missouri finished with the bottom three composite scores, respectively.

Florida ranked seventh lowest in the United States, according to the study, which found that poor lawyer discipline is an indicator of corruption but not a direct measure.

UFA researchers James McNultyPh.D., and graduate student Jason Damm, Ph.D., said states with limited discipline have less reliable and less predictable legal systems, which makes it more difficult for businesses to operate smoothly.

Researchers have also found a correlation between states committed to disciplining lawyers and long-term economic growth, although there is no direct link. They suggest that more research in this area could prove useful.

“More resources for lawyer discipline would likely improve economic growth rates for states at the bottom of our rankings,” said McNulty, professor emeritus of finance at FAU. College of Business. “Law schools in these states would also be wise to focus more on legal ethics.”

Damm earned a doctorate from FAU this year and will begin teaching at the University of Miami in the fall. He and McNulty reached their conclusions after analyzing data from 2000 to 2017.

They used the American Bar Association’s Annual Survey of Lawyer Discipline (SOLD) and developed five measures of discipline: number of complaints; number of lawyers accused of misconduct; the relationship between the number of lawyers assigned and the number of complaints; the budget for the discipline of lawyers; and workload per disciplinary lawyer.

In scoring the highest, New Hampshire had the fourth fewest complaints of the 50 states, the fourth lowest case count, and the fourth highest case count per disciplinary attorney.

Alabama’s highest ranking was 25th among indicted attorneys, and the state finished no better than No. 31 in the other four categories.

After Vermont, the states with the highest composite scores are: South Carolina; Texas; California; Hawaii; Georgia; Virginia; and Washington. The other states in the bottom 10 of the ranking were: Kentucky; Ohio; North Carolina; Indiana; Montana; and Idaho.

McNulty and Damm said they were unaware of another study that used SOLD data to assess lawyer discipline and its effect on state growth.

The researchers noted that if the states are alike in all material respects except for lawyer discipline, it is likely that lawyers struggling with ethical issues will choose to practice in the most lenient area. Additionally, companies that generate large profits through unethical practices such as racketeering, extreme pollution, and predatory lending are more likely to do business in states where there are more lawyers for defend them and who are willing to deviate from the standards governing the legal profession.

“Prosecutors are officers of justice,” according to the study. “If citizens cannot trust the people who make and enforce laws, it is more difficult for any society to function effectively.”

Paul Owers Florida Atlantic University College of Business 561-221-4090 [email protected]

Copyright 2022 GlobeNewswire, Inc.

Aikta Marcoulier: SBA Helps Montana Communities – Homeowners, Renters, Nonprofits and Businesses – Recover Quickly from Disasters | Columnists

June 17, 2022

Montana Mortgages

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AKITA MARCOULIER

Montana is no stranger to disasters, both natural and man-made. The state has a long history of natural disasters, including floods, wildfires, tornadoes, and drought. The recent flooding near Yellowstone National Park is an example of this problem. It’s more important now for residents and small businesses to remember that the best course of action to limit damage from natural disasters is to prepare before disaster strikes.

The Biden administration and SBA Administrator Isabella Casillas Guzman have been at the forefront of ensuring that small businesses, nonprofits, and individual landlords and tenants impacted by natural disasters across the country are getting the support and recovery assistance they need, and the tools to build resilience.

Natural disasters are not only more devastating; they also happen faster, more frequently, and often change rapidly in complexity and scope. In 2020, the United States suffered twenty-two separate billion-dollar disasters – the largest in our history – but space experts expect that number to continue to rise. As the anchors of our communities, small businesses rely on resilient neighborhoods for their customers and employees, and SBA disaster relief loan programs help communities recover quickly.

People also read…

• The SBA Disaster Loan Program is the only federal assistance program that provides private homeowners with an affordable way to lessen the impacts of disasters and protect their homes, families, businesses, employees and livelihoods against the next disaster.

• SBA disaster loan funds can be used to cover insurance deductibles, refinance an existing mortgage, pay for mitigation and protection upgrades, relocate to a safer, lower-risk area, and Moreover. These loans have fixed interest rates amortized over 30 years for low monthly payments and provide an affordable way for homeowners to fully repair/replace their disaster losses not covered by other resources.

• Borrowers using SBA’s physical disaster loan programs are also eligible for up to 20% of their total physical losses, as verified by the SBA, to incorporate additional safeguards to mitigate future damage and loss against the next disaster.

• The SBA offers non-pandemic economic disaster loans to help small businesses, small agricultural cooperatives, and most private nonprofit organizations in a declared disaster area rebuild after suffering a loss. substantial.

• The SBA has several local partner resources to help business owners develop a disaster continuity plan, whether your business is in disaster relief, recovery, or continuity. Across Montana, there are more than fifteen resource partner offices, including Small Business Development Centers, SCORE, a Veterans Awareness Center, and a Women’s Business Center to help you plan for your disaster.

The best way to mitigate the effects of a disaster is to create a disaster continuity plan. This plan should outline how you will contact family, friends, employees and first responders after a disaster. You should also review your insurance coverage to ensure it is up to date and covers all necessary costs. Most importantly, practice and evaluate your plan with family members, managers, and staff to make sure it works. For more information about SBA’s disaster programs, please visit sba.gov/disaster and be sure to follow us on Twitter @SBArockymtn.

Aikta Marcoulier is the SBA’s regional administrator based in Denver. She oversees agency programs and services in Colorado, Montana, Utah, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wyoming.

Daines Slams Democrats Who Killed His ‘Gas Price Relief Act’

June 15, 2022

Montana Economy

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Montana Sen. Steve Daines recently joined Kansas Sen. Roger Marshall in introducing a bill to lower gasoline prices for Americans, called “The Gas Prices Relief Act,” but Bill was killed before exiting the Senate.

Daines appeared on the floor of the US Senate on Tuesday to express his anger and disappointment with senators who opposed the bill. He explained the premises of the bill.

“Madam President, the price at the pump has skyrocketed,” said Senator Daines. “Let’s take a quick trip down memory lane. When President Biden was sworn in, the average weekly gasoline price was around $2.30 per gallon. In fact, when we introduced the bill that we’re trying to pass today, the Gas Price Relief Act, on March 31 of this year, the weekly average was $4.02 a gallon . The weekly average is now $4.84. In fact, other studies show it’s now $5 and climbing.

Daines shared an anecdote from his last trip back to Montana.

“We believe these numbers will continue to rise, and most analysts agree,” he said. “We could be facing $6.00 per gallon of gasoline by this summer. I filled up my van in Belgrade, Montana Friday night. My wife and I stopped at a gas station and when the tank was full the price was $138. The pain at the pump Montana families are feeling today is due to the Democrats’ anti-American energy policies.

Daines asked the senators present about a possible solution, referring to what President Biden has already suggested to bring down gas prices.

” What is the solution ? ” He asked. “We hear President Biden turning to foreign dictators for more oil, tapping or oil reserves or pleading with OPEC to increase production. But perhaps the most disconnected solution I’ve heard, he simply suggests that families buy electric vehicles. I can say that won’t work in a state like Montana. The real solution is to unleash American energy and encourage American energy investment.

Daines explained the benefits of the Gas Price Relief Act.

“This bill I have with Senator Marshall was simple,” he said. “This prevents the Biden administration from imposing new rules or regulations that would reduce the production of petroleum gas or renewable fuels, which would therefore increase gas prices for hard-working Montanese. I urge my colleagues across the way to think about the hard working families across the country. How they try to make ends meet, think of their constituents, who depend on affordable gas prices to get to work or drop their kids off at school. I urge my colleagues opposite who say they support American energy development and want to reduce gas costs to support this bill.

The Senate voted this week to kill the bill.

WATCH: See how much gas it cost the year you started driving

To learn more about how gas prices have changed over the years, Stacker calculated the cost of a gallon of gas for each of the past 84 years. Using data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (released April 2020), we analyzed the average price of a gallon of regular unleaded gasoline from 1976 to 2020 along with the consumer price index (CPI ) for regular unleaded gasoline from 1937 to 1976, including absolute and inflation-adjusted prices for each year.

Read on to explore the cost of gas over time and rediscover how much a gallon cost when you first started driving.

Discover the must-see roads in each state

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Find out where you can find the best access in the country for your course choice, the unique terrain that lends itself to world-class golf and what makes certain clubs stand out.

Plumas Bancorp awarded among the best banks in its category

June 15, 2022

Montana Mortgages

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RENO, Nev., June 15, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Plumas Bancorp (NASDAQ:PLBC), the holding company of Plumas Bank, announced several accolades by leading financial investment firms that assess the performance of financial institutions at national scale. Honors are awarded based on key performance indicators that signal positive value to potential investors and indicate an institution’s ability to generate consistent growth.

Building on over 40 years of excellence, Plumas Bancorp has again been recognized with numerous awards from key financial industry groups. “Plumas Bank is focused on building strong communities – one business and one customer at a time. This foundation drives us to deliver banking excellence and deliver strong value to our customers, shareholders and local communities,” said Andrew J. Ryback, President and CEO, Plumas Bancorp and Plumas Bank.

Ryback continued, “We are growing and performing very well despite the past two years of volatility with the pandemic and wildfires that have devastated our region. These accomplishments are a testament to the strategic vision of our Board of Directors and our leaders and the incredible work of each member of the team.

DA Davidson Bison Select Report recognizes Plumas Bancorp for Fourth consecutive year
For the fourth consecutive year, Plumas Bancorp has met the criteria to be included in DA Davidson’s 2021 Bison Select Report. A financial services firm, DA Davidson releases the semi-annual research report with a focus on recognizing high performing emerging institutions that may be overlooked by investors due to their size.

The Raymond James Bankers Cup awarded to Plumas Bancorp for the fifth consecutive year
For the fifth consecutive year, Plumas Bancorp received the prestigious Raymond James Bankers Cup. Plumas Bancorp ranked in the top 10% out of 229 community banks with assets between $500 million and $10 billion. Additionally, it has consistently ranked among the top five banks every year since 2017. Recognition is based on profitability, operational efficiency, and balance sheet metrics. The Community Bankers Cup recognizes outstanding performance and rewards community banks that create long-term shareholder value.

Findley Reports awards Plumas Bancorp its highest recognitionsame years in a row
For the seventh consecutive year, The Findley Reports, Inc. has recognized Plumas Bancorp as a Super Premier Performing Bank – the highest of The Findley Report’s recognition levels. Plumas Bank is one of 84 Western banks to receive a Super Premiere rating for performance in 2021. Findley’s annual review rates banks on increased liquidity, capital adequacy, structure and growth of assets, quality of loan portfolio and deposits, operational performance, return on equity and stability of senior management.

2022 KBW Bank Honor Roll names Plumas Bancorp as one of the best banking institutions in its category
For the first time, Plumas Bancorp has been added to the coveted Keefe, Bruyette & Woods, Inc., Bank Honor Roll. The winners are publicly traded banking institutions with more than $500 million in total assets that have consistently recorded increases in annual earnings per share over the past decade. KBW found that 17 banking institutions, or only 5% of all banks reviewed, qualified to be on the 2022 KBW Bank Honor Roll.

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About Plumas Bancorp and Plumas Bank
Founded in 1980, Plumas Bank is a locally managed, full-service community bank headquartered in Quincy, California. The bank’s holding company, Plumas Bancorp, was established in 2002 and entered the Nasdaq small cap market in 2005. Plumas Bancorp is headquartered in Reno, Nevada. Plumas Bank operates fourteen branches: twelve located in the California counties of Plumas, Lassen, Placer, Nevada, Modoc, Shasta and Sutter, and two branches located in Nevada in Washoe and Carson City counties. The bank also operates three loan origination offices: two located in California’s Placer and Butte counties, and one located in Klamath County, Oregon. Plumas Bank offers a wide range of financial and investment services to consumers and businesses and has been awarded Nationwide Preferred Lender Status with the United States Small Business Administration. For more information about Plumas Bancorp and Plumas Bank, please visit our website at plumasbank.com.

About DA Davidson
DA Davidson Companies is an employee-owned financial services company providing a range of financial and advisory services to individuals, businesses, institutions and municipalities nationwide. Founded in 1935 with headquarters in Great Falls, Montana, and regional headquarters in Denver, Los Angeles, New York, Omaha and Seattle, the company has approximately 1,475 employees and offices in 27 states.

About Raymond James Financial, Inc..
Raymond James Financial, Inc. (NYSE: RJF) is a leading diversified financial services company providing services to private client groups, capital markets, asset management, banking and other retail services. , businesses and municipalities. The company has approximately 8,700 financial advisors. Total client assets are $1.18 trillion. Public since 1983, the company is listed on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol RJF.

About Findley Reports
Since 1967, The Findley Reports has been the foundation of Findley Companies, providing valuable and accurate financial information to help directors and management navigate the challenges and complexities of banking. The Findley Reports provide the banking industry with performance benchmarking through its annual Super Premier Performing, Premier Performing and Commendable Performing designations.

About KBW
KBW (Keefe, Bruyette & Woods, Inc.) is a Stifel company. Over the years, KBW has established itself as a leading independent authority in the banking, insurance, brokerage, asset management, mortgage banking and specialty finance industries. Founded in 1962, the firm maintains leadership positions in research, corporate finance, mergers and acquisitions, and the sale and trading of equity securities of financial services companies.


        

A look back at the Colorado Avalanche’s very first game in 1995, the Stanley Cup victory in 1996

June 14, 2022

Montana Lending

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DENVER — The Colorado Avalanche’s first-ever game of 1995 started and ended with a bang, kicking off a season that ended with the Lord Stanley Cup in the hands of all Denver’s new hockey team.

The Avs traveled to Denver via financial difficulties in Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. The Quebec Nordiques were truly a “low level team” and Comsat Entertainment (now Ascent Entertainment) purchased them on May 25, 1995. The deal was finalized on July 1 and after the Nordiques moved to Denver, the franchise was officially named the Colorado Avalanche about a month later, according to the NHL.

It rekindled enthusiasm for the city of Denver and the Colorados who had no local team to cheer on since the Colorado Rockies hockey team relocated to become the New Jersey Devils in 1982.

After the move was announced, more than 12,000 season tickets were sold in 37 days, according to the NHL.

On the evening of Oct. 6, 1995, the Avs donned their new uniforms and skated on the ice at Denver’s McNichols Sports Arena — which was torn down and rebuilt as the Pepsi Center in 2000 and renamed the Ball Arena in 2020 — for their first match. Fireworks exploded into the air in celebration, according to the Associated Press.

In its very first regular season game, the Avalanche won 3-2 against the Detroit Red Wings in front of a sold-out arena, with left winger Valeri Kamensky scoring two goals, including one near the 10th minute and another with less than four minutes left in the game. Defender Craig Wolanin scored the second goal, the AP reported.

The Vancouver SUN | October 7, 1995 (Joe Mahoney/Associated Press photo)

The puck found the net behind Avs goaltender Stephane Fiset within the first two minutes of the game, but he was “almost flawless thereafter, stopping 30 shots,” according to the AP.

“After the first goal I knew I had to close the door,” Fiset told the AP. “It’s my job, just to keep the team in the game. I knew we had a lot of time to score, so I just wanted to keep us close and give us a chance to win.

The first penalty in Avalanche history was awarded to Claude Lemieux for a high stick 42 seconds into that game, according to the AP.

READ MORE: Commerce City boy practices in full goalie gear while watching Avalanche games

After the Avs’ victory that night, NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman helped raise a banner at McNichols Sports Arena in Denver to signal the successful return of hockey to Colorado.

It “proved to be a hit with the vocal fans and Avalanche players,” the AP wrote the next day.

Headlines touted the Avs win: “Red Wings buried by Avalanche,” “Avalanche start season in Denver,” “Avalanche slide to 3-2 win with Kamensky goal in third.”

“If goalie Stephane Fiset doesn’t fade in the playoffs like he did last season, the team is a Stanley Cup threat,” wrote a Montana Standard reporter.

The players also expressed their enthusiasm to the media.

Right-winger Owen Nolan told The Gazette from Quebec that “We had good fans in Quebec, but it’s like night and day when it comes to volume. … It’s really a great motivator, especially when the guys are tired. pick us up as a team.

Avalanche Captain Joe Sakic — now Executive Vice President of Hockey Operations for the Avs — says the Red Wings caught them off guard early on.

“It was pretty important for us to knock out the first one at home, and it shows how far we’ve come,” he told The Associated Press.

The Avs fought tooth and nail throughout the regular season, acquiring big names along the way, like goaltender Patrick Roy and forward Mike Keane in December 1995.

After a season of ups and downs – but mostly ups – Denver was buzzing with excitement in May 1996 as the city’s new home team headed to the Stanley Cup Finals against the Florida Panthers.

Final tickets were the most popular items in town, The Daily Sentinel reported on May 31, adding that fans gathered outside the 16,000-seat McNichols Arena hours before tickets became available in the hope to get a seat to see the series.

VANBIESKBROUCK FITZGERALD RICCI

ED ANDRIESKI/Associated Press

Colorado Avalanche center Mike Ricci, bottom forward, falls to the ice after hitting the puck for a goal past Florida Panthers center Tom Fitzgerald, center, and goaltender John Vanbiesbrouck in the second period during the first Stanley Cup game at McNichols Sports Arena in Denver on Tuesday, June 4, 1996. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

Game 1 started on June 4, 1996.

How was the series? As the AP wrote on June 11, the day after Game 4 in Miami: “The Colorado Avalanche took a long time to make quick work of the Florida Panthers.”

In a four-game sweep, the Avs clinched victory, but not before the longest playoff day of the season, when the game went to triple overtime. With 44:31 of overtime – lending to a game that from start to finish lasted four hours and 58 minutes – Game 4 is ranked as the longest scoreless contest and the third longest in the history of the final of the Stanley Cup, the AP reported.

Defender Uwe Krupp scored the game-winning goal at 4:31 of third overtime.

Team captain Sakic, also the league’s MVP that year, called the victory the greatest moment of his life. In total, he scored 18 playoff goals, nearly tying the NHL record. Of those 18, six were winners, according to the AP.

Joe Sakic holding the Stanley Cup after winning in 1996

The Daily Sentinel | June 11, 1996 (Associated Press photo)

Even the Panthers acknowledged the outstanding competition.

“There’s not a guy in the room that I’m not personally proud of,” Panthers player John Vanbiesbrouck told the AP. “The game was intense. It was an epic game.”

The Avs praised their goaltender, Roy, as an “almost royal thing” who wasn’t the loudest, strongest or fastest player, but “there’s no doubt he’s the Colorado Avalanche man,” the Daily Sentinel reported on June 11.

Sports Illustrated Colorado Avs 1996 Stanley Cup Victory

The Daily Sentinel | June 12, 1996 (Associated Press photo)

“Hockey is a dynamic sport,” Av defender Sylvain Jean Lefebvre told a reporter. “And there will be times when the other team will have it. A lot of times in those situations it’s up to the goalkeeper to reverse the momentum. It’s up to the goalkeeper to calm everybody down, to bringing everyone back to the same page. And when your keeper is Patrick Roy, when you look back and see him in the net, it’s an incredible feeling. You just know that everything is going to be okay.

As victory came in Miami, Denver’s Larimer Square erupted with horns and cheers after Krupp’s goal.

“For all of us who have been waiting to say we are the world champions of something, we can finally say it,” former Denver mayor Wellington Webb told the AP. “We are very proud of it and we are going to celebrate all aspects of it.

In a newspaper article published two days after the victory, the AP wrote that the Avalanche “did what the Broncos of the NFL and the Nuggets of the NBA could not accomplish, which the Rockies of hockey (who later moved to New Jersey) failed to approach in six seasons and what baseball’s Rockies only see in their dreams.

CORBET

RICK BOWMER/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Colorado Avalanche’s Rene Corbet hoists the Stanley Cup in the air after the Colorado Avalanche beat the Florida Panthers 1-0 in triple overtime to sweep the final 4-0 in Miami on Monday, June 10, 1996. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

Excluding the first five years of major North American professional sports leagues, the Avs were only the second team to win a title in their first year, the AP reported.

Among the celebrations, first-year coach Marc Crawford paid tribute to dedicated Nordiques-turned-Avs fans in Quebec.

“I would like them to feel included in our victory,” he told the AP. “We lived in a wonderful hockey city and we were lucky to be welcomed into another. We had a beautiful house in Quebec and now we have a beautiful house in Denver.

It was a nod to a long journey crowned with the best prize in the game.

“A year ago Denver didn’t have a hockey team. Now he has a Stanley Cup,” the AP article read.

Although the Avs had successful games in subsequent regular seasons, they didn’t make a return to the Stanley Cup Finals until 2001 when the team defeated the New Jersey Devils in Game 7. .

The Avalanche are now back in contention for the Stanley Cup for the first time since 2001 as they prepare to face the Tampa Bay Lightning.

Oilers Avalanche Hockey

Jack Dempsey/AP

Colorado Avalanche goaltender Pavel Francouz skates on the ice after the team’s 4-0 win over the Edmonton Oilers in Game 2 of the Western Conference Playoff Finals of the NHL Stanley Cup on Thursday, June 2, 2022, in Denver. (AP Photo/Jack Dempsey)

Game 1 begins at 6 p.m. Wednesday and Denver7 brings you all the action on our airwaves.

Here’s a breakdown of the games, which all start at 6 p.m. on Denver7 (with pregame coverage at 5:30 p.m.):

  • Game 1: Wednesday, June 15
  • Game 2: Saturday June 18
  • Game 3: Monday, June 20
  • Game 4: Wednesday, June 22
  • Game 5: Friday, June 24 (if needed)
  • Game 6: Sunday June 26 (if needed)
  • Game 7: Tuesday, June 28 (if needed)

Click here for more ways and places to watch Stanley Cup Finals games.

READ MORE: Ball Arena and Denver Sports Commission speak out on Stanley Cup Final impacts

East Helena man convicted of bank fraud in $1million COVID-19 relief package

June 13, 2022

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An East Helena man who admitted to lying in a scheme to receive more than $1 million in Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans backed by the Small Business Administration (SBA) for aid to coronavirus relief and using the money instead for personal gain was sentenced on June 7 to 30 months in prison, followed by three years of supervised release, according to a press release from the US attorney’s office.

Trevor Gene Lanius-McLeod, 48, pleaded guilty in December 2021 to bank fraud and engaging in monetary transactions in property from specified illegal activities.

Chief U.S. District Judge Brian M. Morris presided. Chief Justice Morris also ordered restitution of $1 million, $125,000 of which will be paid jointly with co-defendant Kasey Wilson who was sentenced in March 2022.

“During a difficult time in our country’s history, Lanius-McLeod stole money from a government program designed to keep businesses afloat and lined their pockets at the expense of truly needy businesses. Today we send a strong message that such fraud will not go unpunished in the District of Montana. I want to thank Assistant U.S. Attorney Colin M. Rubich, IRS Criminal Investigation, the FBI, and all of our law enforcement partners for their work on this case,” U.S. Attorney Jesse Laslovich said.

The PPP program, part of the federal CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act), provided emergency assistance to small businesses for job retention and certain other expenses.

“Today’s sentence is a direct reflection of the seriousness of Mr. Lanius-McLeod’s crimes,” said Andy Tsui, special agent in charge of the IRS local office of criminal investigations in Denver. “Not only is Lanius-McLeod guilty of crimes against the federal government, but he also victimized individuals and businesses that the Paycheck Protection Program was meant to protect. These actions will not be tolerated, and the judge’s decision sends a clear message to those who attempt to defraud CARES Act programs that these crimes will not go unpunished.

In court documents, the government alleged that beginning in April 2020, Lanius-McLeod devised a scheme to fraudulently obtain PPP money. Lanius-McLeod applied for four PPP loans through the Valley Bank of Helena. In the applications, Lanius-McLeod made numerous material and false statements to obtain approximately $1,043,000 in fraudulent funds from the four loans. In addition, Lanius-McLeod applied for and received a PPP loan in the amount of $349,000 on behalf of Renovated Montana Properties LLP, an entity controlled by Lanius-McLeod.

Lanius-McLeod made numerous misrepresentations about the PPP loan application. If not for the misrepresentations, Lanius-McLeod would not have qualified for a PPP loan. The defendant falsely stated that Renovated Montana Properties LLP paid payroll taxes and had 25 employees. The company never paid payroll taxes and had no employees outside of Lanius-McLeod.

The government further alleged that, in a promissory note, the defendant agreed to use the funds for business-related expenses. None of the loan money was used for these purposes. Instead, the proceeds were spent on various personal expenses, including the mortgage on Lanius-McLeod’s personal residence.

“Trevor Lanius-McLeod greedily robbed small businesses that depended on PPP funds to survive,” said Salt Lake City FBI Special Agent in Charge Dennis Rice. “His sentence should serve as a reminder that the FBI and our federal partners are working vigilantly to ensure that federal aid funds are used as intended, and that those who defraud these programs will be held accountable.”

Assistant U.S. Attorney Colin M. Rubich prosecuted the case, which was investigated by the IRS-Criminal Investigation and the FBI, with assistance from the U.S. Treasury Inspector General for the US tax administration and secret service.

On May 17, 2021, the Attorney General established the COVID-19 Fraud Enforcement Task Force to mobilize the resources of the Department of Justice in partnership with agencies across government to scale up efforts to combating and preventing fraud linked to the pandemic.

The task force strengthens efforts to investigate and prosecute the most culpable domestic and international criminal actors and assists agencies administering relief programs to prevent fraud, among other methods, by increasing and integrating coordination mechanisms existing ones, identifying resources and techniques to uncover fraudulent actors and their agendas, and sharing and leveraging information and knowledge gained from previous enforcement efforts. For more information about the Department’s response to the pandemic, please visit https://www.justice.gov/coronavirus.

Anyone with information about alleged attempted fraud involving COVID-19 can report it by calling the Department of Justice’s National Center for Disaster Fraud (NCDF) hotline at 866-720-5721 or via NCDF’s online complaint form at: https://www. .justice.gov/disaster-fraud/ncdf-disaster-complaint-form.

NJ senator calls for discrimination based on height and weight to be banned

June 13, 2022

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Currently, Michigan is the only state in the nation that prohibits discrimination based on height or weight under its civil rights law, and there is no such federal law.

New Jersey State Sen. Andrew Zwicker of D-Monmouth Junction would like to see the Garden State become the second in the United States to ban such biases in hiring, housing and educational practices.

“It’s a serious issue, and we don’t condone racial discrimination, gender discrimination, or age discrimination,” Zwicker said.

His bill (S2741), which was introduced June 2 and referred to the Senate Labor Committee, would categorize rejection based on height and weight under the state’s “anti-discrimination law.”

It’s something Zwicker said some other states or individual cities have come up with, but he was “shocked” to learn was not on New Jersey’s books.

He said studies have shown “widespread” discrimination specifically around weight, usually much more in women than in men, and he thinks it’s both harmful and hurtful.

“A study I saw said that between 20% and 40% of overweight people reported some sort of discriminatory behavior towards them,” Zwicker said. “Society put in these ideal sizes, these ideal weights, and those are just things that have been created, and not everyone fits that ideal. And so, people are treated differently.”

According to the wording of Zwicker’s proposal, Michigan law prohibits discrimination in “employment, education, housing, public housing, and public office,” among other grounds, and the senator hopes to cover the same ground. with the New Jersey bill.

Exceptions are provided for cases “in which an individual’s height or weight is a bona fide occupational qualification”, the bill says.

In short, Zwicker’s legislation would empower someone who believes they have suffered such discrimination to sue.

He cited an Atlantic City case years ago, in which a judge dismissed a lawsuit brought by female casino workers who were weighed weekly and threatened with dismissal because there was no basis in New Jersey law to support their claims.

This bill, he said, would close that loophole.

“It’s more than common sense, it’s just the right thing to do, that’s why I wrote it and why I stand for it now,” Zwicker said.

Zwicker intends the legislation to take effect immediately if and when it is passed and signed by the governor.

Patrick Lavery is a reporter and anchor for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach him at [email protected]

Click here to contact an editor about a comment or correction for this story.

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Sri Lanka’s steps towards the end of the heat wave – Analysis – Eurasia Review

June 12, 2022

Montana Lending

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With progress towards political stability and the assurance of broad external support, there is hope that Sri Lanka will overcome the crisis.

After months of economic distress, peaceful expressions of public anger punctuated by indiscriminate violence, political strife and institutional instability, Sri Lanka now seems on the road to a return to normalcy.

There’s no denying that the winding queues for fuel and cooking gas are still there, and the prices for basic necessities are sky-high. Some basic necessities such as powdered milk have either disappeared from the market or are too expensive. But the power supply has improved significantly, putting an end, so to speak, to an “age of darkness”.

The term of government, which had ceased to run in several parts of the country, including the critical space outside the president’s office in Colombo, has been reinstated. The threat of disciplinary action prevented a strike by Ceylon Electricity Board engineers, which would have cut power to the entire island. The engineers demanded the cancellation of two energy projects financed by the foreign private sector, including one by the Adanis of India.

As India continues to deliver essentials like food, fuel, fertilizer and medicine to the best of its ability, China has finally come out of its shell and signaled its readiness to step in to help the Sri Lanka in trouble. A row with Russia (a potential fuel supplier) over the legality of an Aeroflot flight ended in a diplomatic engagement, albeit belatedly. Apparently, it takes time for the Lankan bureaucracy to assimilate Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe’s advice that it should treat the country’s traditional friends with respect and consideration.

Political stability

Painfully elusive political stability now seems within reach. It finally became clear to the main political actors, both on the side of power and the opposition, that without political stability, international financial assistance will not be available.

While President Gotabaya Rajapaksa has remained steadfast in his position that he would only step down if expelled by constitutional means and not under pressure from street agitators, the Aragalaya or The struggle to force him to quit has run out of steam. This allowed him to start functioning normally. But the “Go Gota Go” activists could take satisfaction from the fact that they ousted the other Rajapaksas, including Prime Minister Mahinda Rajapaksa.

Appointment of Wickremesinghe

The problems created by instability in Parliament and confusion in foreign relations were partially resolved by the appointment of Ranil Wickremseinghe as Prime Minister in place of Mahinda Rajapaksa. Although Wickremesinghe’s appointment was bitterly criticized for being the only member of his party in parliament, Wickremesinghe highlighted his good relations with the international community and donors.

The dispute in parliament over the content of the 21st Amendment (21A) aimed at reducing the powers of the executive president seems to end with the removal of one of the main obstacles. Basil Rajapaksa, a powerful member of the ruling Sri Lanka Podujana Peramuna Party (SLPP) and a dual citizen (US-Lanka), resigned on Thursday, abiding by a clause in Bill 21A which stated that dual citizens are not eligible to hold political office. . Once that issue is resolved and MPs agree to let the president retain the defense portfolio, 21A is expected to pass with the required two-thirds majority and without a referendum.

Given the informal agreement between President Gotabaya and Prime Minister Wickremesinghe to work harmoniously, the unfortunate history of Sri Lanka’s troubled diarchies will hopefully not be repeated. This will help the international community to trust the government of Lanka and accelerate its aid programs.

The likely appointment of leading entrepreneur Dhammika Perera to replace Basil Rajapaksa as the ruling SLPP MP will be welcomed by the business sector as well as the international community as he has released a detailed plan to improve Sri Lanka’s revenue. , sector by sector. . It could even be housed in cabinet in line with the president’s and prime minister’s penchant for involving subject matter experts in governance.

The Prime Minister held talks with IMF Managing Director Kristalina Georgieva to expedite the services-level agreement with Sri Lanka and extend the IMF facility by September. For its part, China said it is “ready to work with relevant countries and international financial institutions to continue to play a positive role in supporting Sri Lanka’s response to the current difficulties and efforts to alleviate debt burden and achieve sustainable development”.

Long way to go

While these developments are encouraging, Sri Lanka still has a long way to go before normalcy is restored. The prime minister has told parliament that Sri Lanka needs to find US$3.3 trillion for oil imports over the next six months. It would need US$250 million over the next six months to supply cooking gas. He warned that winding queues at petrol stations would continue for the next three weeks and called for fuel rationing through a coupon system.

Sri Lanka’s annual rice requirements are 2.5 million tonnes. But he only has 1.6 tons in stock. To overcome severe shortages in the coming months, Sri Lanka must import $150 million worth of rice each month. It would cost $600 million a year to import fertilizer. An improvement in the harvest situation is not expected until February 2023.

A recent study by the World Food Program (WFP) found that 73% of participating households had reduced their diet and food intake. Sri Lanka needs US$5 billion over the next six months to ensure daily life is not disrupted. Another billion US dollars is needed to strengthen the rupee. In total, the country needs 6 billion dollars, at least, for the next six months.

According to the Central Bank, average GDP growth in 2022 will be -3.5% but according to the International Monetary Fund, growth will be negative at 6.5%, partly due to the conflict in Ukraine. Recovery is only expected in 2024.

Sri Lanka’s foreign loans amount to $53 billion. Many loan installments received from multilateral institutions are due to be repaid this month. In fact, Sri Lanka has already defaulted and is seeking new repayment reschedulings.

Loss of income

The prime minister said the government lost LKR 6.6 billion ($18.3 million) in revenue with the abolition of a tax system introduced in 2019. Inflation rose with money printing . LKR 2.5 billion has been released into the economy from 2020 to May 20, 2022. There has been chronic mismanagement of finances by ministries. The government is unable to provide funds to cover the losses of any of the public enterprises.

Corrective actions

Regarding the proposed corrective measures, the Prime Minister said that with the help of the IMF, by 2024, Sri Lanka will have an economic recovery plan. By 2025, the budget could be balanced.

“We call on the International Monetary Fund to organize a conference to help unite our lending partners. The holding of such a conference under the leadership of India, China and Japan will be a great strength for our country. China and Japan have different credit approaches. We hope that consensus on lending approaches can be reached through such a conference,” the Prime Minister said.

Provisional budget

The interim budget will reduce unnecessary government spending, while controlling other costs, he said. On what is for the poor, Wickremesinghe said the annual expenditure to provide various reliefs to economically backward people will increase from $350 million to $550 million. Loans to farmers would be amortized at 100%. Loans obtained by farmers with less than two hectares of land will be stopped immediately.

Sherman Anderson: Correct the ‘Cottonwood’ decision | Columnists

June 12, 2022

Montana Economy

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SHERMAN ANDERSON

With an active wildfire season ahead, state and federal authorities are doing everything they can to protect our communities, wildlife, water resources and forests. One way to do this is to break the impasse in the management of federal forests and allow the implementation of wildfire mitigation projects. Montana senators can help by supporting legislation to correct the “Cottonwood” decision that blocks common sense management of national forests.

In recent years, lawsuits related to the Ninth Circuit’s Cottonwood decision have halted dozens of forest management projects in western Montana. The move created a new layer of government bureaucracy and red tape, necessitating further consultation among federal agencies on forest plans each time a new species is listed under the Endangered Species Act, qu critical habitat is identified or “new information” becomes available.

The decision created numerous anti-management lawsuits, adding years of delays to forest thinning projects that can help reduce the size and intensity of today’s wildfires. In an infamous example, the Cottonwood decision halted the Stonewall Vegetation Project in the Lewis and Clark National Forest. Litigation over the project was not resolved until the Park Creek and Arrastra fires burned unhealthy, overgrown forests that would have been proactively addressed.

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The Cottonwood decision has prevented our public land managers from looking after the land and ensuring that our national forests remain safe and accessible for all Montanese to enjoy. It has also blocked efforts to improve wildlife habitat and protect our watersheds and water supplies. Many of these projects were developed by local collaborations with diverse interests and had already undergone lengthy environmental reviews.

As our forests burn, the ruling has only served to add more duplicate paperwork to our flawed forest management system and added more costs to American taxpayers. It has also hurt our economy by costing family jobs in lumber. We simply cannot afford to lose our ability to manage forests and provide affordable Montana-made wood products.

Senator Steve Daines has tabled a bill that would allow public land managers and wildlife biologists to track the best available science for consultation. This would provide much-needed clarity in current regulations, so agencies can achieve their conservation goals rather than being stymied by anti-forestry lawsuits. The bill is supported by leading wildlife and outdoor conservation groups such as the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and the National Wild Turkey Federation.

There has been bipartisan support in the past to correct the Cottonwood decision and allow forest management projects to continue. This work began during the Obama administration, when President Obama’s Justice Department sought to overturn the Ninth Circuit’s decision all the way to the United States Supreme Court. While Republicans and Democrats in Congress — including Sen. Jon Tester — have backed legislation to address parts of the ruling, serial litigants are still using Cottonwood to block needed stumpage projects.

There is an urgent need to approve this new solution to the Cottonwood decision, but it is difficult for anything to pass in Congress these days. In a divided US Senate, Senator Jon Tester and Senator Steve Daines have an important opportunity to help advance a bipartisan solution through Congress. Time is running out for another active wildfire season. The time to act is now.

Sherman Anderson is the owner of Sun Mountain Lumber at Deer Lodge. His company is the largest private employer in Powell County and he is dedicated to keeping Montana’s forests healthy and resilient.

Helena Man jailed for defrauding COVID-19 relief fund

June 11, 2022

Montana Loans

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Trevor Gene Lanius-McLeod, 48, of East Helena, was sentenced in Great Falls Federal District Court this week to nearly three years in prison and must pay more than $1 million in restitution for defrauding the federal government’s Paycheck Protection Program.

KGVO News reached out to Amanda Prestegard, IRS Criminal Investigative Special Agent in the Denver Field Office.

“He personally took out four Paycheck Protection Program loans through the Valley Bank of Helena,” Prestegard began. “In the applications, he made material and false statements to obtain $1,043,000 in fraudulent funds from these four loans. On top of that, he used a company called Renovated Montana Properties, which was an entity he controlled, to apply for another loan that amounted to nearly $350,000.

Prestegard said Lanius-McLeod deliberately falsified the information he used in the applications.

“So in all of these loans, the applications contained misrepresentations,” she said. “It was based on the fact that he had declared that he paid payroll taxes, that he had 25 employees and that he paid an average monthly salary charge of $139,000. And all of that was wrong. So basically he just filed a bunch of bogus claims, got money he thought was for his businesses, and then used it for his personal gain.

Prestegard said Lanius-McLeod also had a partner in crimes.

“In this case, he was sentenced to three years in prison and his accomplice Casey Jones-Wilson was sentenced to a year and a day in prison,” she said. “We’re seeing some pretty significant jail time which obviously correlates to the amount of money that’s been stolen from the programs. In this case, he will owe over a million dollars in restitution on top of the three years that he will serve in prison, and his co-conspirator will have to repay more than $100,000.

She said the Cares Act had attracted many fraudulent loan applications that the IRS was investigating.

“What it looks like now is a small percentage, but it’s still a huge success for the program,” she said. “We looked at a lot of these cases. We investigated over 660 cases nationwide of people trying to defraud these Cares Act programs, and it resulted in approximately $1.8 billion in fraudulent money being received.

The proceeds were spent on various personal expenses, including the mortgage on Lanius-McLeod’s own home.

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Low Mortgage Rates, Low Inventory, Migration, Causing Boiling Real Estate Market

June 11, 2022

Montana Mortgages

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The rise in home values ​​over the past two years, which has fueled the boiling real estate market in many places across the country, is due to a variety of factors, Freddie Mac reported this week.

The federally funded housing finance company, licensed by Congress in 1970, operates in the secondary mortgage market, buying loans from approved lenders, giving it the ability to issue more mortgages and bring more Americans in their own homes, according to the organization.

The company reported Thursday that home prices have jumped 33% nationally over the past two years, largely due to low mortgage interest rates, falling home inventories due to underconstruction and declining distressed sales, and the migration of people out of cities to suburban and rural parts of the country.

Despite the COVID-19 pandemic, interest rates have fallen to a low of just 2.7% in 2020, nearly 2% lower than the 4.7% rate in 2018, helping homeowners looking to refinance and increasing demand from home buyers entering the market.

The company said falling inventory of homes, which were already in short supply before the pandemic hit, has also driven prices higher with fewer homes available relative to buyer demand.

“An increase in home sales and a decline in homes listed for sale are both clearly noticeable (in the data),” the report said. “Sales would have been – and still will be – even higher if more homes were available for purchase.”

The pandemic has exacerbated the problem with a slowdown in construction due to rising prices for lumber and other materials caused by shutdowns and worker and supply chain shortages during this time.

There has also been a drop in the number of “short” or struggling sales, with those listings falling from 8% to 3% in 2020 and 2021, according to the report.

The final piece of the puzzle was the “accelerated migration” of people from metropolitan areas to more rural areas in the South and West, with medium-sized metropolitan areas with between 500,000 and 1 million people seeing the biggest increases. , while the 25 largest cities, according to the company, have seen migration out of those places increase by three times the previous exodus rate.

Sun Belt states like Florida, Tennessee, Georgia, North and South Carolina, and Texas saw their populations increase by 20% or more, as did several western mountainous states, including Montana, Idaho, Nevada, Utah and Arizona, according to the report.

According to the National Association of Realtors, Florida currently has the top five metropolitan commercial real estate markets, including Orlando, Miami, Palm Beach, Fort Lauderdale and Fort Myers.

Part of the calculation of this index takes into account the migration of people who settle in the region.

© 2022 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

Pt. Mayor of Pleasant Beach, NJ offers $192,000 to Ukrainians

June 10, 2022

Montana Economy

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POINT PLEASANT BEACH — Mayor Paul Kanitra has donated nearly $200,000 to two charities supporting Ukrainian refugees who were picked up at a concert.

Kanitra was moved by the coverage of the Russian invasion of Ukraine to pack five suitcases with supplies and head to the Polish-Ukrainian border and see what he could do to help.

“We’ve volunteered with other groups. We’ve done just about anything and everything, from preparing food, to delivering meals at the border, to shuttling refugees, to by purchasing supplies and distributing them to the refugee centre,” Kanitra said. New Jersey 101.5’s Steve Trevelise in April.

Photo provided by Mayor Paul Kanitra

Photo provided by Mayor Paul Kanitra

A Jersey Shore All-Star Fundraiser

Once back in Point Pleasant Beach, he hosted Concert For Ukraine at Jenkinson’s with an all-star lineup that included Bobby Bandiera, Eddie Testa, Jo Bonnano, Polish rock band Green Secret and Steve Forber.

New York’s Dumka Ukrainian Choir, which appeared on Saturday Night Live, opened the concert with the Ukrainian national anthem.

The gig exceeded Kanitra’s expectations and raised nearly double what he expected. He traveled to the United Nations in New York and Washington to present a check for $100,000 to World Central Kitchen and another for $92,000 to Caritas Internationalis.

“These donations will provide over a hundred thousand meals to desperately hungry Ukrainian refugees. This will help support and protect so many orphans and children,” Kanitra wrote on her Facebook page. “You have all made an incredible difference in the world and you should be so proud.”

Dan Alexander is a reporter for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach him at [email protected]

Click here to contact an editor about a comment or correction for this story.

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NJ man found guilty of Jamesburg double murder, including his father

June 10, 2022

Montana Lending

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A Middlesex County jury found a Jamesburg man guilty of kill his own father and a second man before setting fire to a house in a cover-up attempt more than two years ago.

Jaree Kitchen, 24, was convicted of the 2019 murders of Clifford Kitchen Jr. and Gregory Fisher, both 53 and of Jamesburg.

During a two-week trial that ended on June 1, prosecutors said Jaree Kitchen had moved back to Jamesburg from Georgia to live with her father – but soon after they started having ” important issues”.

House in Jamesburg after a fire

House in Jamesburg after a fire (RLS Metro Breaking News)

Things turned sour with a brutal brawl on November 4, 2019, in which Jaree Kitchen fatally stabbed her father and Fisher, who lived in the same house at 7 Sheridan Street.

Two days later, he set fire to the house in an attempt to destroy evidence of what he had done, prosecutors said.

Kitchen was also convicted of aggravated arson, possession of a weapon, possession of a weapon for an unlawful purpose, two counts of desecration of human remains and tampering with evidence related to the murders.

He is due to be sentenced on October 28 in Middlesex County Superior Court.

Erin Vogt is a reporter and anchor for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach her at [email protected]

Click here to contact an editor about a comment or correction for this story.

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Contrast First Interstate BancSystem (NASDAQ:FIBK) and First Internet Bancorp (NASDAQ:INBK)

June 10, 2022

Montana Mortgages

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First Interstate BancSystem (NASDAQ:FIBK – Get Rating) and First Internet Bancorp (NASDAQ:INBK – Get Rating) are both finance companies, but which is the best investment? We’ll compare the two companies based on valuation strength, analyst recommendations, risk, profitability, earnings, institutional ownership and dividends.

Volatility and risk

First Interstate BancSystem has a beta of 1.03, indicating that its stock price is 3% more volatile than the S&P 500. In comparison, First Internet Bancorp has a beta of 0.73, indicating that its stock price is its stock is 27% less volatile than the S&P 500.

Institutional and Insider Ownership

69.4% of First Interstate BancSystem shares are held by institutional investors. By comparison, 70.5% of First Internet Bancorp’s shares are held by institutional investors. 6.4% of the shares of First Interstate BancSystem are held by insiders of the company. By comparison, 7.2% of First Internet Bancorp’s shares are held by insiders of the company. Strong institutional ownership indicates that large fund managers, hedge funds, and endowments believe a company is poised for long-term growth.

Analyst Recommendations

This is a summary of current ratings and price targets for First Interstate BancSystem and First Internet Bancorp, as provided by MarketBeat.

Sales Ratings Hold odds Buy reviews Strong buy odds Rating
First interstate banking system 0 0 3 0 3.00
First internet bank 0 0 3 0 3.00

First Interstate BancSystem currently has a consensus price target of $44.00, indicating a potential upside of 19.70%. First Internet Bancorp has a consensus price target of $58.67, indicating a potential upside of 56.99%. Given First Internet Bancorp’s likely higher upside, analysts clearly believe that First Internet Bancorp is more favorable than First Interstate BancSystem.

Profitability

This table compares the net margins, return on equity and return on assets of First Interstate BancSystem and First Internet Bancorp.

Net margins Return on equity return on assets
First interstate banking system 14.78% 7.09% 0.73%
First internet bank 29.10% 13.17% 1.16%

Dividends

First Interstate BancSystem pays an annual dividend of $1.64 per share and has a dividend yield of 4.5%. First Internet Bancorp pays an annual dividend of $0.24 per share and has a dividend yield of 0.6%. First Interstate BancSystem pays 85.4% of its earnings as dividends, suggesting it may not have enough earnings to cover its dividend payment in the future. First Internet Bancorp pays 4.9% of its profits as a dividend. First Interstate BancSystem has increased its dividend for 9 consecutive years. First Interstate BancSystem is clearly the better dividend stock, given its higher yield and longer track record of dividend growth.

Benefits and evaluation

This table compares the revenue, earnings per share and valuation of First Interstate BancSystem and First Internet Bancorp.

Gross revenue Price/sales ratio Net revenue Earnings per share Price/earnings ratio
First interstate banking system $656.00 million 6.14 $192.10 million $1.92 19.15
First internet bank $166.73 million 2.16 $48.11 million $4.91 7.61

First Interstate BancSystem has higher revenue and earnings than First Internet Bancorp. First Internet Bancorp trades at a lower price-to-earnings ratio than First Interstate BancSystem, indicating that it is currently the more affordable of the two stocks.

Summary

First Internet Bancorp beats First Interstate BancSystem on 8 out of 15 factors compared between the two stocks.

About First Interstate BancSystem (Get a rating)

First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. operates as a bank holding company for First Interstate Bank which provides a range of banking products and services in the United States. It offers various traditional deposit products, including checks, savings deposits and term deposits; and repurchase agreements primarily for commercial and municipal depositors. The Company also offers real estate loans including commercial real estate, construction, residential, agricultural and other real estate loans; consumer loans including direct personal loans, credit card loans and lines of credit and indirect loans; variable and fixed rate business loans for small and medium sized manufacturing, wholesale, retail and service businesses for working capital needs and business expansion; and agricultural loans. Additionally, it provides a range of trust, employee benefits, investment management, insurance, agency and custodial services to individuals, businesses and non-profit organizations. In addition, the company offers marketing, credit review, loan servicing, credit card issuance and servicing, mortgage sales and servicing, indirect purchase and processing of consumer loans, loan collection and other operational services, as well as online and mobile banking. It serves individuals, businesses, municipalities, and other entities in a variety of industries, including agriculture, construction, education, energy, government services, healthcare, hospitality, housing, l mining, professional services, real estate development, retail, technology, tourism and wholesale. Trade. As of December 31, 2021, it operated 147 banking offices, including self-drive facilities in communities in Idaho, Montana, Oregon, South Dakota, Washington and Wyoming. The company was incorporated in 1971 and is based in Billings, Montana.

About First Internet Bancorp (Get a rating)

First Bancorp Internet logoFirst Internet Bancorp operates as a bank holding company for First Internet Bank of Indiana which provides commercial and retail banking products and services to personal and business customers in the United States. The Company accepts unpaid and interest-bearing demand deposits, savings accounts, money market accounts and traded deposit accounts, as well as certificates of deposit. It also offers commercial and industrial real estate, homeownership and investors, construction, residential mortgages, home equity and home improvement, small installments, term loans and other consumer loans, as well as single-tenant lease financing and public and healthcare financing; franchise financing; and small business loans. In addition, the company is involved in the purchase, management, service and custody of municipal securities; and the provision of municipal credit and leasing products to government entities. In addition, it offers corporate credit card and cash management services. The company provides its services through its website firstib.com. First Internet Bancorp was founded in 1999 and is based in Fishers, Indiana.



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Helena man convicted of using over $1 million in COVID-19 relief loans for personal gain | ABC Fox Montana Helen

June 9, 2022

Montana Loans

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UPDATE, JUNE 9 AT 10:16 AM:

The Department of Justice reports that Trevor Gee Lanius-McLeod was sentenced after he admitted to using the more than $1 million Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans he received for personal gain. .

Lanius-McLeod allegedly misrepresented the PPP loan application and otherwise did not qualify.

The government claimed that Lanius-McLeod agreed to use the funds for business-related expenses and that the proceeds were in fact spent on various personal expenses, including the mortgage on his personal residence.

“Today’s sentence is a direct reflection of the seriousness of Mr. Lanius-McLeod’s crimes,” said Andy Tsui, special agent in charge of the IRS local office of criminal investigations in Denver. “Not only is Lanius-McLeod guilty of crimes against the federal government, but he also victimized individuals and businesses that the Paycheck Protection Program was meant to protect. These actions will not be tolerated, and the judge’s decision sends a clear message to those who attempt to defraud CARES Act programs that these crimes will not go unpunished.

Trevor Gee Lanius-McLeod was sentenced to 30 months in prison, followed by three years of probation.

He was also ordered to pay restitution of $1,000,043.00, of which $125,000 will be paid jointly with co-defendant Kasey Wilson who was sentenced in March 2022.


Previous cover, January 5:

HELEN, Mont. – A Helena man pleaded guilty after making false statements to receive Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans which he used for his personal gain.

Trevor Gene Lanius-McLeod pleaded guilty to bank fraud and engaging in monetary transactions in property from specified illegal activities.

The Department of Justice (DOJ) said in a statement that in court documents the government claimed that in April 2021 Lanius-McLeod applied for PPP loans through the Valley Bank of Helena and lied about the applications and the documents that accompanied them.

Lanius-McLeod allegedly received $1,043,000 in fraudulent funds on the four loans.

Additionally, Lanius-McLeod applied for and obtained a $340,000 PPP loan on behalf of Renovated Montana Properties LLP, an entity he controlled.

Lanius-McLeod falsely said the company paid payroll taxes and had 25 employees, the DOJ reports.

Payroll taxes were never paid by the company and it had no employees other than Lanius-McLeod, however, it occasionally employed independent contractors.

In a promissory note, Lanius-McLeod agreed to use the loan for payroll costs and other business-related expenses, and none of the loans were used for those purposes, the statement said.

Instead, the loan was used for personal expenses, including paying the mortgage on Lanius-McLeod’s personal residence.

The DOJ says that but for several misrepresentations, Lanius-McLeod would not have qualified for this loan.

A plea agreement was filed in the case where the parties agreed that if the court accepts the plea agreement at sentencing, the government will seek the dismissal of nine other counts.

Lanius-McLeod faces a maximum of 30 years in prison, a $250,000 fine and three years of supervised release for the crime of bank fraud.

States Add New Requirement for High School Graduation: Financial Literacy

June 9, 2022

Montana Lending

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Michigan lawmakers have approved a bill requiring high school students to take personal finance to classify. It now goes to Governor Gretchen Whitmer for her signature.

This would make Michigan the 14th state to require public high schools to teach personal finance. Florida and Georgia also passed similar laws this year, and a number of other states are considering them.

Number of States Requiring Personal Finance in High School has nearly tripled since 2019 after barely budging for years.

John Pelletier of the Center for Financial Literacy at Champlain College has a theory as to why:

“I actually think COVID has really opened people’s eyes to how financially precarious people are in how they live their lives.”

On top of that, he said, it has become very easy for anyone, including teenagers, to buy stocks – and cryptos. “You’re dealing with a young person who can, in probably 10 minutes, open a Robin Hood account, right, or a Coinbase account, so those concepts, I think, are almost more important now,” he said.

Research shows that requiring a personal finance course in high school changes people’s behavior for the bettersaid Carly Urban at Montana State University.

“[It] improves credit scores at age 22. It reduces crime rates. Student loan repayment is actually much higher after graduation. And payday loans are going down,” Urban said.

According to Next Gen Personal Finance Nonprofit20 states are currently considering legislation to require a high school class.

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Members of the Congressional Western Caucus take a close look at the Snake River dams

June 8, 2022

Montana Economy

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Four members of the US Congress recently took a close look at the Snake River dams in Washington.

The four members of the Congressional Western Caucus, which Rep. Dan Newhouse, R-Washington, chairs, watched the fish travel through various passageways at the Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. A boat trip also took them through the lock system near the Tri-Cities.

Representatives Bruce Westerman, R-Arkansas; Cliff Bentz, R-Oregon; Matt Rosendale, R-Montana; and Mariannette Miller-Meeks, R-Iowa, joined the tour.

From left to right, U.S. Representatives Dan Newhouse, R-Washington; Mariannette Miller-Meeks, R-Iowa; Bruce Westerman, R-Arkansas; Cliff Bentz, R-Oregon; and Matt Rosendale, R-Montana. Representatives visited the Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River near Pasco, Washington.

Congressional Western Caucus

Newhouse is a strong supporter of the region’s hydroelectric system. He said bringing other congressional Republicans to the roadblock was part of his strategy to promote Washington.

Congress could eventually decide whether to approve a decision to remove or modify the four controversial Snake River dams, Newhouse said.

“The dams are attacked. I think the more members of Congress who can come and see first hand exactly what is involved when we talk about hydroelectric dams and the benefits we get from them – I think the better off we are,” he said. declared.

However, environmental groups and the Nez Percé Tribe continue to press for the removal or modification of the four dams in an effort to protect the endangered salmon.

“Nothing has been more devastating to these species than four dams impeding a 140-mile section of their migration on the lower Snake River,” EarthJustice lead attorney Todd True wrote in a statement. Press. “Scientists have been saying for years that breaking these dams is the best thing we can do to restore these fish.”

But, Newhouse said further study is needed into court-ordered increases in spills over dams, which he says increases dissolved gases in the water, posing a threat to water bodies. Pisces. Moreover, he stated that the increased spillage wastes potential energy.

“It could go through turbines to generate power to boost our economy. The cost of energy is literally exploding. It’s really hard to see all that potential energy being literally wasted,” Newhouse said.

However, environmental groups have said the increased spillage is helping young salmon migrate out to sea, calling the increased spillage a crucial protection for juvenile salmon.

“The science is clear and for many years the spill has increased the survival of migrating juvenile fish. And while the increase in dumping has been helpful, it remains insufficient if we are to save these fish and prevent their extinction,” said Joseph Bogaard, executive director of Save Our Wild Salmon.

Low Homeownership Rates Hurt Native Americans in MT / Public News Service

June 8, 2022

Montana Mortgages

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After a history of forced eviction from their lands, Native Americans are now struggling to own homes.

Until recently, Indigenous peoples had little recourse against discrimination in housing policies. The Fair Housing Act of 1968 helped. However, data from Prosperity Now showed that only 45% of Native Americans in Montana own their homes, compared to nearly 70% of white residents.

Darrell LaMere, loan officer at the Billings-based Native American Development Corp., said the pandemic and the current housing crisis have compounded that problem.

“Affordability, availability, substandard housing – everything about the housing market is terrible in bookings,” he said. “Housing is in dire straits right now, on all reservations in Montana.”

LaMere said housing is an important part of economic development, adding that he thinks a priority should be helping potential borrowers improve their bad credit scores or negative credit reports, which could otherwise reduce their chances of qualifying for a mortgage.

LaMere said some big banks don’t work with people on reservations. This is reminiscent of the practice of redlining, when banks discriminated against people based on their race or neighborhood. He says there are also legal differences for reservations.

“We are considered sovereign countries,” he said, “and some banks are hesitant to invest on reserves, just because of the lockdown issue.”

He explained that part of the concern is that some tribes don’t have foreclosure laws, so it can be harder for banks to recoup their losses if a homeowner defaults.

Some financial institutions, including the NADC, work with these borrowers to improve their chances. LaMere noted that there is also 1st Tribal Lending, which can provide loans through India’s Section 184 Home Loan Guarantee Scheme. It is a product of the US Department of Housing and Urban Development.

“A conventional bank would look at your credit score and your credit report. If it was bad, they would say, ‘No, we can’t give you a loan. But 1st Tribal Lending will work with you. Thus, they help people whose credit reports and credit history are compromised.

HUD data from 2017 showed the program guaranteed more than 37,000 loans.

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‘Bargain Block’ shows 2 guys rebuilding Detroit 1 house at a time

June 8, 2022

Montana Loans

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Over the years we have seen a lot of desperation and desperation when the subject of the city of Detroit is mentioned. Then came Keith Bynum and Evan Thomas. You couldn’t find two people less likely to take on this project of buying run-down homes in run-down Detroit neighborhoods, fixing them up almost like new, then reselling them for an affordable price, but also for a profit .

Thomas is a physicist with a doctorate, and a carpenter and builder; Bynum holds an MBA and is a designer. At fourteen, he created his first company. Four years ago, the two lived in Colorado, but why not move to Motown? Now their HGTV series, “Bargain Block” is back for another season, but more importantly, they’re making a difference, making homeownership possible for some people who might not be able to afford it. a house, and since they made twenty-two so far, maybe bring quarters back.

If you look west, there’s a ton of gentrification going on in Chicago, but Detroit isn’t up to it yet. But with Bynum and Thomas, maybe it gives a boost.

(Mission in fact via YouTube)

From a television production perspective, most of these shows follow a script and a formula, and you can’t forget their real estate partner, Shea Hicks-Whitfield, who is a cheerleader in town. In the end, just like the Lions, maybe this sleeping giant rises like a phoenix.

HGTV says Wednesday, June 8 will bring new episodes and premiere at 8 p.m. ET is a throwback to their first season. And if the show is new to you, this is a good place to start.

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2022 ‘Stranger Things’ Cast Net Worth

June 7, 2022

Montana Lending

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The first season of stranger things premiered on Netflix on July 15, 2016 and instantly catapulted into the 21st century pop culture zeitgeist. The sci-fi series quickly became one of the most-watched shows on the streaming service and maintained its popularity. When Volume 1 Season 4 premiered over Memorial Day weekend 2022, it broke Netflix’s record for the biggest premiere weekend ever. According Deadlinethe seven-episode installment totaled 286.79 million (!!) viewing hours.

Four iterations later, it has undeniably become a worldwide phenomenon and has made its cast into mega-stars, including Millie Bobby Brown, Noah Schnapp, Finn Wolfhard, Caleb McLaughlin, Gaten Matarazzo, Sadie Sink and many more. The franchise has expanded into a possible spin-off series and endless merchandising designed for a mega-fandom, there are even Upside Down-inspired makeup collections.

Volume 2 of stranger things 4 debuts on July 1, and after that Season 5 marks the final chapter of the Hawkins gang. Even though the show is coming to an end soon, its main cast have earned some serious $$$ from the show. Here we break down the net worth of stranger things stars.

Millie Bobby Brown (Eleven)

netflix

British actress Millie Bobby Brown instantly became a household name after the hugely successful first season of stranger things. According Deadline, MBB reportedly earned $30,000 per episode for seasons 1 and 2, and somewhere between $200,000 and $250,000 for season 3. It’s unclear how much she took in for season 4, but it’s estimated that she now earns around $300,000 per episode. Above stranger thingsMillie starred in 2019 Godzilla: King of the Monsters and 2021 Godzilla vs. Kong. She deserved to act and produce credits on the film adaptations of Mysteries of Enola Holmes book series and the original Netflix movie The girls I’ve been. In 2019, Millie launched her beauty line, Florence by Mills. All of that, plus her campaigns with big brands like Samsung, Converse, Vogue Eyewear and EA Games, earned the 18-year-old a net worth of around $10 million, according to Celebrity Net Worth.

Noah Schnap (Will Byers)

stranger things

Courtesy of Netflix

The story of Noah Schnapp’s character, Will Byers, launched the stranger things franchise after his sudden demise on November 6, 1983. As previously reported, Noah and the other younger cast members reportedly earned around $30,000 per episode for the show’s first two seasons, and around $250,000 per episode for the following seasons. But Noah also starred in Steven Spielberg’s 2015 film. bridge of spies2019 abe2020s Waiting for Anyaand he even voiced Charlie Brown in Peanuts movie information. According Celebrity Net WorthNoah has a net worth of $3 million.

Finn Wolfhard (Mike Wheeler)

stranger things finn wolfhard as mike wheeler in stranger things cr courtesy of netflix © 2022

Courtesy of Netflix

Finn Wolfhard plays Mike Wheeler, a vital member of the Dungeons & Dragons team, Will’s best friend, and El’s eventual boyfriend. Besides his main role in stranger thingsFinn has acting credits in many other film projects such as Ghostbusters: Afterlife, This, It Chapter Twoand The goldfinch. Considering all of this and knowing that he now earns around $250,000 per stranger things episode, according to Celebrity Net WorthFinn is estimated to have a net worth of $4 million.

Caleb McLaughlinLucas Sinclair

stranger things caleb mclaughlin as lucas sinclair in stranger things cr courtesy of netflix © 2022

Courtesy of Netflix

Like many of his co-stars, Caleb landed his breakout role in stranger things. He stars as Lucas Sinclair and now earns around $250,000 per episode of the sci-fi series. Before stranger thingsthe actor guest-starred on such popular series as Blue blood, Law and Order: Special Victims Unitand shades of blue. In 2020 he starred alongside Idris Elba in the Netflix original movie concrete cowboyand in 2019, appeared in the sports drama directed by Steven Soderbergh High flying bird. According Celebrity Net WorthCaleb has a net worth of $3 million.

Gaten Matarazzo (Dustin Henderson)

stranger things

netflix

Gaten Matarazzo warmed all of our hearts as Dustin “Dusty” Henderson on stranger things, often coming into play in dire situations to communicate and solve mysteries via his amateur radio. Prior to her standout role on the show, Gaten starred in Les Miserables: The Broadway Musical and held a guest spot on The black list. But in the years that followed stranger thingshe played in The Angry Birds 2 movieand on May 25, it was announced that he would be returning to the Broadway stage as Jared Kleinman in Dear Evan Hansen. The 19-year-old also starred in campaigns for Verizon Fios and Old Navy, loaning out his net worth of $5 million, according to Celebrity Net Worth.

Sadie Sink (Max Mayfield)

stranger things sadie cast as max mayfield in stranger things cr courtesy of netflix © 2022

Courtesy of Netflix

Sadie Sink joined the stranger things cast as Max Mayfield in season two, and according to Statistical, she was earning $150,000 per episode as of October 2018. But given her larger storylines in seasons three and four, she is now expected to earn over $250,000 like her other co-stars. The actress also starred in Taylor Swift’s short ‘All Too Well’ alongside Dylan O’Brien and has been the face of campaigns for major fashion houses including Miu Miu, Kate Spade and Givenchy. She even walked the runway for Undercover’s Fall 2018 show during Paris Fashion Week. Celebrity Net Worth estimates his net worth to be around $1 million, but considering his pay per episode for stranger thingswe expect it to be closer to $3 million.

Maya HawkeRobin Buckley

stranger things

netflix

Maya Hawke – who comes from a famous family, being the daughter of actors Ethan Hawke and Uma Thurman – was also a later addition to the stranger things family She is likely to earn roughly the same as her other cast members and earn around $200,000 or $250,000 per episode. She also appeared in Once upon a time… in Hollywood, Fear Street: Part One – 1994and the Little woman TV shows. Besides acting, she models for brands such as vogue and Calvin Klein. This all adds up to his estimated net worth of $3 million, per Celebrity Net Worth.

Charlie HeatonJonathan Byers

stranger things

netflix

Charlie Heaton retained an important role in stranger things since Season 1, with Will’s shy older brother, Jonathan Byers. Before landing his role in the series, the actor guest-starred on British television series such as DCI banks and Vera. He has also acted in films including As you are, Shut in, marrow boneand no future. According NME, Charlie previously played in UK-based band Comanechi and toured with the band for over a year. Considering the fact that he probably earns around $250,000 per stranger things episode, Celebrity Net Worth estimates that Charlie’s net worth is around $4 million.

Natalia DyerNancy Wheeler

stranger things

netflix

Natalia Dyer’s acting credits date back to 2009 when she made her film debut as Clarissa Granger in Hannah Montana: The Movie. She then starred in smaller film projects such as Blue like jazz, Don’t let me goand Nightfall before landing the role of Mike’s older sister, Nancy Wheeler, in stranger things. The actress has appeared in several films since and earns a salary similar to hers stranger things costars, adding to his net worth of around $4 million, per Celebrity Net Worth.

Joe Keery (Steve Harrington)

stranger things l to r gaten matarazzo as dustin henderson and joe keery as steve harrington in stranger things cr courtesy of netflix © 2022

Courtesy of Netflix

Joe Keery has been a stranger things mainstay since Season 1, first as Nancy Wheeler’s love interest and now as everyone’s favorite babysitter, Steve Harrington. He has acted in films including the drama directed by Jessica Chastain Molly’s Game in 2017, and the Shawn Levy-directed comedy free guy in 2021. In addition to acting, Joe was a guitarist in the Chicago-based psychedelic rock band Post Animal, per NMEbut now works solo under the name DJ – he even performed at festivals such as Lollapalooza and Boston Calling, and went on tour in April 2022. Celebrity Net Worth estimates that Joe’s net worth is around $4 million.

Winona RyderJoyce Byers

stranger things winona ryder as joyce byers in stranger things cr courtesy of netflix © 2022

Courtesy of Netflix

As one of the biggest names in the business who signed on stranger thingsWinona Ryder is an established actress who has starred in major productions like beetle juice, Heathers, Edward Scissorhandsand Girl interrupted. In 1994, she won the Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actress for her role in The age of innocence. She was also recognized by the organization for her roles in the 1991s Sirens and stranger thingsand in 1994 and 1995 she was nominated for an Academy Award for The age of innocence and the 1995 TV series Little woman. Due to his rich career, Celebrity Net Worth reports that she originally earned $100,000 per episode for the first two seasons of stranger things, and now earns around $350,000 per episode. The outlet estimates his net worth to be around $18 million.

David HarborJim Hopper

stranger things

netflix

Like Winona, David Harbor was an established actor when he joined the stranger things cast as Police Chief Jim Hopper. Before the sci-fi series, he appeared in films such as Brokeback Mountain, War of the Worldsand Revolutionary Roadand most recently starred in Hellboy, suicide squad, Black Widowand the HBO television series The press room. According Celebrity Net WorthDavid and Winona earned similar paychecks throughout stranger things‘ so far, and the outlet reports that the actor has a net worth of around $6 million.

Lorenz Named Director of Specialty Banking at First Interstate | Company

June 5, 2022

Montana Mortgages

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Gary Lorenz was appointed Chief Specialty Banking Officer of First Interstate Bank.

In this new role, Lorenz will provide leadership and oversight for First Interstate’s Indirect Lending, Payment Services and Home Lending divisions. Lorenz will be a member of the company’s management team and will report directly to Kevin Riley, president and CEO of First Interstate.

A 30-year veteran of the financial services industry, Lorenz has held various senior management positions and has extensive experience in direct/indirect lending and retail banking. Lorenz most recently served as President of Cedar Valley Market for Great Western Bank, which was acquired by First Interstate in February 2022. A graduate of Hawkeye Institute of Technology (Hawkeye Community College) with a degree in accounting, Lorenz will move to Billings , Montana .

“It is an honor to serve as Director of Specialty Banking Services for First Interstate, a new role for the Bank. I am excited to work with our business leaders to elevate First Interstate’s indirect lending, debit/credit card and mortgage products and services to the next level for our customers,” said Lorenz.

People also read…

First Interstate Bank is a community bank with $33 billion in assets as of March 31, 2022. First Interstate proudly offers financial solutions in Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, Missouri, Minnesota, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Washington and Wyoming. A recognized leader in community banking, First Interstate is driven by strong values ​​and a commitment to providing a rewarding employee experience, strong shareholder returns, exceptional products and services to its customers, and resources to communities. which she serves. More information is available at firstinterstate.com.

Aida Alvarez sells 18,181 shares of Opportun Financial Co. (NASDAQ:OPRT)

June 3, 2022

Montana Loans

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Timely Financial Co. (NASDAQ: OPRTGet a rating) Director Aida Alvarez sold 18,181 shares of Oportun Financial in a trade dated Thursday, June 2. The stock was sold at an average price of $11.46, for a total value of $208,354.26. Following the completion of the sale, the administrator now directly owns 18,874 shares of the company, valued at $216,296.04. The sale was disclosed in a legal filing with the Securities & Exchange Commission, available at this hyperlink.

Shares of NASDAQ OPRT traded at $0.08 during Friday trading hours, hitting $11.47. 233,482 shares of the company were traded, against an average volume of 149,083. The company’s 50-day moving average price is $12.41 and its 200-day moving average price is $16.49. Oportun Financial Co. has a 12-month low of $10.28 and a 12-month high of $27.95. The stock has a market capitalization of $376.38 million, a price-earnings ratio of 4.04 and a beta of 1.37.

Opportunity Financial (NASDAQ: OPRTGet a rating) last released its quarterly earnings data on Monday, May 9. The company reported EPS of $1.58 for the quarter, beating the consensus estimate of $0.60 by $0.98. Oportun Financial had a net margin of 12.76% and a return on equity of 18.01%. The company posted revenue of $214.70 million in the quarter, versus analyst estimates of $198.40 million. In the same period a year earlier, the company earned earnings per share of $0.27. Oportun Financial’s quarterly revenues increased by 58.7% compared to the same quarter last year. Sell-side analysts expect Oportun Financial Co. to post EPS of 1.96 for the current fiscal year.

Large investors have recently changed their stock holdings. Versant Capital Management Inc purchased a new stake in Oportun Financial in Q1 worth approximately $38,000. Dorsey Wright & Associates bought a new stake in shares of Oportun Financial in the fourth quarter worth approximately $43,000. Quantbot Technologies LP increased its stake in shares of Oportun Financial by 113.3% during the 1st quarter. Quantbot Technologies LP now owns 3,200 shares of the company worth $45,000 after acquiring an additional 1,700 shares in the last quarter. Citigroup Inc. increased its stake in Oportun Financial to 92.2% in the third quarter. Citigroup Inc. now owns 2,291 shares of the company valued at $57,000 after acquiring an additional 1,099 shares during the period. Finally, Concourse Financial Group Securities Inc. bought a new position in Oportun Financial in Q4 worth $60,000. Institutional investors hold 70.58% of the company’s shares.

The OPRT has been the subject of several reports by research analysts. Loop Capital began covering Oportun Financial in a report on Monday, March 14. They set a “buy” rating and a price target of $24.00 for the company. BTIG Research restated a “buy” rating and posted a price target of $27.00 on shares of Oportun Financial in a research report on Thursday, April 14. To finish, Zacks Investment Research moved shares of Oportun Financial from a “hold” rating to a “strong-buy” rating and set a $13.00 price target on the stock in a Wednesday, May 18 research note. Five investment analysts gave the stock a buy rating and one gave the company a high buy rating. Based on data from MarketBeat, Oportun Financial has a consensus rating of “Buy” and an average target price of $24.00.

Oportun Financial Company Profile (Get a rating)

Oportun Financial Corporation provides financial services. It offers personal loans, car loans and credit cards. The company serves its customers online and by telephone, as well as through point of sale. It operates in 24 states in the United States, including Arkansas, Delaware, Indiana, Kentucky, Mississippi, Montana, North Dakota, New Hampshire, Oregon, South Carolina, South Dakota and Virginia.

See also

Insider buying and selling by quarter for Oportun Financial (NASDAQ:OPRT)



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Man shot at NJ Transit New Brunswick station

June 3, 2022

Montana Economy

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One person was fatally shot at the New Brunswick NJ Transit station on Sunday evening, according to Rutgers police in a statement released Thursday.

The person was approached by four men who struck her with a “blunt object” around 8:30 p.m., according to Rutgers police.

The person who was hit pursued the assailants but was shot in the lower limbs. The four men fled and were last seen in the area of ​​Somerset Street and College Avenue, one block from the train station.

Police were only informed when the victim sought medical treatment for the gunshot wound which is not life threatening.

A spokeswoman for NJ Transit said no arrests have yet been made in the case and the investigation is ongoing.

It was the second incident at the NJ Transit station that week.

NJ Transit’s Red Bank station on the North Jersey Coast Line

NJ Transit’s Red Bank station on the North Jersey Coast Line (Carl Schellenberger)

A man was found dead on the incoming platform of NJ Transit’s Red Bank station on Tuesday afternoon, according to the spokesperson. His identity has been confirmed as Gabriel Aparicio-Hernandez, 27.

Red Bank Police Captain Mike Frazee told Patch there were no signs of trauma or foul play. The spokeswoman would not divulge additional information about the case citing the ongoing investigation.

Dan Alexander is a reporter for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach him at [email protected]

Click here to contact an editor about a comment or correction for this story.

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Municipal tax bill for every city and town in NJ, filed

Just under 30 cents of every $1 of property taxes collected in New Jersey supports municipal services provided by cities, townships, boroughs, and villages. Statewide, the average municipal tax bill alone in 2021 was $2,725, but that varied widely from over $13,000 in Tavistock to nothing in three townships. In addition to the $9.22 billion in taxes for municipal purposes, special tax districts that in some locations provide municipal services such as fire protection, garbage collection or economic development collected 323, $8 million in 2021.

The Barbie Pop-Up Truck Tour is coming to New Jersey

June 3, 2022

Montana Lending

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If you have a little girl (or, to be honest, a little boy) who loves playing with Barbies, New Jersey is the place to be for the next two weeks.

The Barbie Malibu Pop-Up Truck continues its 2022 tour with a stop Saturday June 4 at Edison at Menlo Park Mall and Saturday June 11 at Paramus at Westfield Garden State Plaza.

The truck tour started in 2019 to celebrate Barbie’s 60th birthday and is now celebrating 50 years of Malibu Barbie.

According to Patch.com, the merchandise offered for sale by the truck is retro and includes:

  • Barbie Logo Embroidered Denim Jacket
  • Pink Barbie Logo Hoodie
  • Tie-dye bucket hat
  • ring t-shirt
  • Set of embroidered patches
  • Enamel pin set
  • Tote
  • Insulated stainless steel bottle
  • Beach towel
  • Malibu Barbie Necklace
  • Barbie Logo Mug

The products will be available for purchase of the Barbie Pop Up Truck by credit card. The price ranges from $12 to $75.

Chief Operating Officer Hannie Peng said MyCentralJersey.com,

“The Malibu Barbie theme is just love for Barbie fans – it doesn’t have to be just for the California girl. Everyone can relate to her free spirit and love of fun in the sun.

At Edison, the truck will be parked in the grassy area near Macy’s from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. At Paramus, it will be parked around the corner from the mall entrance near Capital Grille from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.

The truck has visited more than 50 cities so far.

The views expressed in the above post are those of New Jersey 101.5 talk show host Bill Doyle only.

You can now listen to Deminski & Doyle — On demand! Listen to New Jersey’s favorite radio show every day of the week. Download the Deminski & Doyle show wherever you get podcasts, on our free app, or listen now.

Click here to contact an editor about a comment or correction for this story.

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How Somerset County saved 2,000 NJ residents from COVID eviction

June 2, 2022

Montana Lending

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On Tuesday, the Somerset County Board of Commissioners approved the allocation of up to $1.6 million from the US bailout to add to a previous federal grant of $7.7 million from the federal rescue program. emergency rental assistance for which the application deadline expired in mid-April.

The total funding of more than $9 million, the county said, prevents the eviction of more than 2,000 residents from nearly 900 households following the lifting of COVID-19 moratoriums.

Commissioner-Director Shanel Robinson said the effort she and her colleagues undertook actually started with making sure the owners were compensated.

“We went through a process to identify tenants and landlords who were part of this cohort who may have been behind on their rent, and/or landlords who had been unable to collect,” Robinson said. .

The average support package offered to households so far has been valued at just under $10,000 for up to 12 months of rent arrears, three months of term rent and assistance with utility bills. , according to Robinson.

The county said 18 of its municipalities received housing assistance funding, led by Franklin Township at nearly $2.9 million, and black residents made up about half of those who identified their race. or their ethnic origin.

“Hopefully this will get us through this next phase, but again we continue to monitor the situation,” she said. “It’s very fluid. We just want people to be healed and stronger than before the pandemic.”

Other counties in New Jersey, Robinson said, may have abandoned their process for managing this emergency aid or hired outside consultants.

But Somerset County has identified people within its borders who could be ambassadors, helping with applications at county libraries.

This expanded and maximized the county’s outreach potential, according to Robinson.

“Mobile services and meeting people where they are, not just meeting their needs where they are, but being physically among them in the community where they actually live,” she said. “Certainly, as we come out of or emerge from this pandemic, we want to make sure everyone is on solid ground, but especially our most vulnerable populations.”

While no single legislative body has all the answers about how to lift its residents out of pandemic-related financial stress, Robinson said, collaboration leads to better outcomes for everyone.

So no matter what county a New Jersey resident is from, she suggested reaching out to local elected officials and agencies when needed.

Patrick Lavery is a reporter and anchor for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach him at [email protected]

Click here to contact an editor about a comment or correction for this story.

WATCH: States with the most new small businesses per capita

Municipal tax bill for every town and city in NJ, filed

Just under 30 cents of every $1 of property taxes collected in New Jersey supports municipal services provided by cities, townships, boroughs, and villages. Statewide, the average municipal tax bill alone in 2021 was $2,725, but that varied widely from over $13,000 in Tavistock to nothing in three townships. In addition to the $9.22 billion in taxes for municipal purposes, special tax districts that in some locations provide municipal services such as fire protection, garbage collection or economic development collected 323, $8 million in 2021.

New Jersey’s New Legislative Districts for the 2020s

The boundaries of the 40 legislative districts for the Senate and Assembly elections from 2023 to 2029, and possibly 2031, were approved in a bipartisan Allocation Commission vote on February 18, 2022. The map continues to favor the Democrats, although Republicans say it gives them a chance of winning a majority.

Inland Bank and Trust Closes $1.6 Million Loans

June 2, 2022

Montana Loans

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OAK BROOK – Inland Bank and Trust said it has entered into two commercial loans totaling $1.6 million to a financial advisory firm with offices in Maryland and Montana.

A financial advisor within the company applied for the initial loan to acquire part of the company’s customer database. This gave the firm’s owners the option of later making an external acquisition, funded by the second loan, to expand their business to a third firm, Inland said.

The transactions were completed under Inland Bank’s financial advisor loan program.

Since its inception, the program has funded nearly $20 million in loans to financial advisors located in Illinois, Alabama, Arizona, California, Colorado, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina and Ohio. , Oklahoma, South Carolina, Texas and Wisconsin, the company said.

Tiffany Tyson, vice president of commercial loans at Inland Bank, originated both loans.

The city with the fewest people owning a home in every state – 24/7 Wall St.

June 2, 2022

Montana Mortgages

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The U.S. real estate market took off in the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic. The homeownership rate – or share of owner-occupied housing – jumped 2.6 percentage points between the first and second quarters of 2020, by far the biggest increase on record. At the end of 2020, there were 2.1 million more homeowners in the United States than there were a year earlier.

The surge in home sales has been fueled by several factors, including historically low mortgage rates and, as some experts speculate, the pandemic, which has led many Americans to reassess where and how they live. Here’s a look at the mortgage rate in America every year since 1972.

Nationally, the homeownership rate stands at 64.4%, according to the latest data from the US Census Bureau’s American Community Survey. However, this rate varies widely across the country, from state to state, and from city to city.

Using census data, 24/7 Wall St. identified the metropolitan area in each state with the lowest homeownership rate. Metropolitan areas are ranked according to the share of owner-occupied dwellings.

It’s important to note that four states – Delaware, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont – each have only one metropolitan area, and that one ranks as having the highest homeownership rate default lowest only. Among the places on this list, homeownership rates range from 48.7% to 70.6% and are lower than the state’s homeownership rate in almost all cases.

Home ownership can be expensive, and in most metro areas on this list, the typical household earns less than the statewide median household income. The low incomes of these areas can make home ownership less affordable for a larger portion of the population. Here’s a look at the 20 cities where the middle class can no longer afford housing.

Many metropolitan areas on this list are home to large colleges or universities. Because a large portion of the population of college towns resides there temporarily, the transient population is more likely to rent a house than to buy one. These locations include New Haven, Connecticut, home to Yale University; Ann Arbor, Michigan, home of the University of Michigan; and Ames, Iowa, home to Iowa State University.

Click here to see the metro area with the lowest homeownership rate in each state
Click here to read our detailed methodology

Deb Haaland to Boost Clean Energy Generation on Public Lands

June 1, 2022

Montana Economy

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Interior Secretary Deb Haaland traveled to Las Vegas on Tuesday to announce new efforts to support the growing clean energy economy and green jobs in Nevada and the Southwest.

Climate change poses an existential threat to our environment, health and economic well-being, according to Haaland.

In Las Vegas, Haaland announced two new developments to aid renewable energy efforts. One is a new policy to reduce rents and fees charged for wind and solar projects on public lands by 50% for existing and new projects.

“This will inspire industry to partner in responsible solar and wind development and help encourage and inspire to invest and compete in the clean energy economy,” she said.

A second development is the creation of five new Renewable Energy Coordination Offices to manage the growing number of requests by wind, solar and geothermal developers through the Bureau of Land Management.

Coordinating offices include a national office at BLM headquarters, state offices in Arizona, California and Nevada, and a regional office in Utah.

Both projects are part of the Biden administration’s goal of a net-zero economy by 2050.

“The Bureau of Land Management continues to take bold steps to attract renewable energy investment to public lands in an environmentally responsible manner,” said BLM Director Tracy Stone-Manning. “This will help support our clean energy economy by creating well-paying jobs, increasing our energy security and reducing greenhouse gas emissions.”

This story was produced by the Mountain West News Bureau, a collaboration between Wyoming Public Media, Nevada Public Radio, Boise State Public Radio in Idaho, KUNR in Nevada, the O’Connor Center for the Rocky Mountain West in Montana , KUNC in Colorado, KUNM in New Mexico, with support from affiliate stations throughout the region. Funding for the Mountain West News Bureau is provided in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

The photo included in this story is licensed under a Creative Commons Flickr license.

Hunterdon regional football player hit on NJ Route 202

May 31, 2022

Montana Loans

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FLEMINGTON — A 15-year-old boy riding an electric skateboard was struck by a vehicle on Route 202 early Monday morning.

The Hunterdon County Attorney’s Office said the teenager was shot at around 2:20 a.m. at the intersection with Reaville Road, according to Hunterdon County Attorney’s Office Captain Paul Approvato. The driver, Raymond Lozinak, 61, of Bayonne, remained at the scene of the accident, Approvato said.

The teenager was taken to Morristown Hospital by medical helicopter for treatment of his injuries. No charges have been filed in the case, according to Approvato.

Approvato did not reveal the circumstances of the accident, but said the teenager was using an electric skateboard.

Jerry Walter (R)

Jerry Walther (R) (Therese Apostolis via GoFundMe)

“An awesome kid who touched so many lives”

A GoFundMe page created to help the victim’s family with medical bills and lost wages identified the teenager as Jerry Walther. He is a member of the Hunterdon Regional Red Devils football team, according to the GoFundMe page set up by Theresa Apostolis.

“Jerry ‘JerBear’ is an awesome kid who touched so many lives,” Apostolis wrote. “Please pray that Jerry continues to fight in this extremely difficult battle.”

An investigation into the crash is ongoing, Approvato said. He asked anyone with information about the crash to call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-321-1000.

Emily Grill contributed to this report

Dan Alexander is a reporter for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach him at [email protected]

Click here to contact an editor about a comment or correction for this story.

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Kaley Cuoco is dating again, and her stewardess co-star talks about new Beau Tom Pelphrey

May 31, 2022

Montana Lending

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Kaley Cuoco revealed her new relationship with ozark‘ Tom Pelphrey just a few weeks ago on his social media. Since then, the new Hollywood couple have been sharing candid snaps here and there. It was a nice change of pace after the tough year she went through following her split from Karl Cook. With her romance with Pelphrey in the public sphere, her Flight attendant the co-star opened up about her new beau.

Since starring as best friends on the HBO Max series, Cuoco and Zosia Mamet’s on-screen chemistry has carried over into real life as Mamet helped her get back on track after the divorce. Being such close friends, Girls the alum was required to meet the The Big Bang Theory the vet’s new buddy. It appeared that Pelphrey made a good impression on Mamet. By speaking with HEYthe actress gave her take on the new couple’s budding relationship.

You know what. It’s really interesting, and she said it from the start, I knew it when she knew it. When you’re someone’s best friend, when you’re truly their best friend and love them deeply, you’re so interconnected. And when I met him, I was one of the last to meet him. I met him and I was like, ‘I feel like I’ve known you forever.’ And he likes it like nobody’s business, and that’s all that matters to me.

Watching your best friend fall in love again after a devastating heartbreak is (usually) a cathartic moment for everyone involved. Listening is one thing, but Mamet felt the same connection Cuoco had with Pelphrey. As the actress mentioned, all you want is for your friends to be happy and to feel loved again. With her off-screen best friend being the last to meet her new boyfriend, Kaley Cuoco couldn’t help but feel bad for the two people closest to her who hadn’t met earlier.

It’s weird, she was like, the last one to meet him. I was devastated.

Well, at least her BFF and her new beau finally met and hooked up instantly. So things have generally settled down. Hopefully, fans can see photos of Cuoco, Mamet and Pelphrey hanging out together at some point.

His new relationship seemed like a personal bright spot after a mixed year of personal lows and professional highs. The The Big Bang Theory alum chatted with fellow divorcee Kelly Clarkson as they drank wine while talking about their split. Of course, Clarkson understood the sitcom star’s grief given that she and her former husband Brandon Blackstock were officially declared ‘divorced’ in 2021. Of note, the 8 simple rules vet and her ex were apparently on friendly terms while supporting her after their split. But the OG american idol The star and her ex had a rocky breakup, fighting over custody of the kids and their Montana ranch. Yet the two stars have found a common ally in each other.

Kaley Cuoco has several people supporting her as she moves on with newfound love. With a new handsome, his series The stewardess recently wrapped Season 2, which saw Cassie heal from some personal issues in the finale. As viewers wait to hear news of a third season, Kaley Cuoco has several TV projects set to debut in 2022.

Car parking: Missoula debates current needs, future trends

May 30, 2022

Montana Economy

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A man pays to park in downtown Missoula. (Current Martin Kidston/Missoula file)

Some say a large apartment complex proposed for Midtown Missoula does not have enough parking spaces, with only one space per residential unit. Others say it has too much, creating a sea of ​​asphalt that could be put to better uses.

The parking debate with new developments is perennial in Missoula, where land is both limited and expensive. Using it to park cars is expensive and could fall out of use as carpooling and public transport expand to provide new mobility options.

As one reader suggested, “many developers discourage car ownership or provide residents with a small fleet of vehicles. There are alternatives to huge car parks.

In downtown Missoula, Ian Ortlieb, director of the Missoula Parking Commission, said the Covid-19 pandemic “sent everything into a tailspin” around the parking lot. Demand dried up as people stayed home and the economy slowed.

Now that the restrictions have been lifted, many companies have turned to new work models like telecommuting or a hybrid schedule. If the trend continues, this could reduce downtown parking demand in the long term.

“As we monitor what’s happening — the recovery process in Missoula — we’re paying close attention to parking demand,” Ortlieb said. “But I think it’s early at this point to really understand what’s going on.”

Urban planners in big cities have already started to rethink how people get around and what the future of mobility will bring. At some point, they predict, self-driving vehicles will transport passengers to any location, reducing the need for personal cars while making large parking lots obsolete.

A parking attendant patrols the street in downtown Missoula. (Current Martin Kidston/Missoula file)

Already, ride-sharing like Uber and Lyft are offering new transportation options, and new developments in other cities now include drop-off areas in hard-pack parking. Missoula also has a convenient transit system at Mountain Line, which is set to expand services to make the system more convenient.

But this will require more density in some parts of the city, which is difficult to achieve when parking takes up so much space.

“Looking into the future of the area we’re managing in, the density is only going to increase,” Ortlieb said of downtown. “So how can we increase parking supply without necessarily increasing our footprint with parking lots? You can install many more parking spaces in a garage on surface land.

According to the Washington Post, cities like Cincinnati and Los Angeles have new parking lots with flat floors and higher ceilings. This allows them to be converted into apartments or offices if parking demand drops.

In downtown Missoula, the need for parking is uneven and varies by area, Ortlieb said. The city offers approximately 1,200 spaces on the street, including short-term, long-term, and metered parking. It offers an additional 1,300 parking spaces in its rental program, including surface lots and garages.

“We don’t get the complaint that there’s too much parking,” Ortlieb said. “Just about everywhere, there are localized shortages. But some areas seem a bit narrower than others.

Another measure of demand may be the revenue brought to the city by parking. In 2021, Ortlieb said, the Missoula Parking Commission brought in $2.4 million in overall revenue. In the first three quarters of this fiscal year, it has already grossed over $2.1 million.

Nationally, the 25 largest U.S. cities raised about $1.5 billion in total from parking, according to “Special Report: How Self-Driving Vehicles Could Limit City Budgets.”

“We expect a little more than the previous year. Hopefully this is a sign of recovery from the pandemic,” Ortlieb said of this year’s parking revenue.

Outside of downtown, Missoula city and county codes require a set number of parking spaces based on a project. This month, however, the city council began exploring potential incentives for developers in exchange for more affordable housing.

The Casa Loma project on South Avenue would dedicate the majority of the property to parking.

One would allow a developer to reduce parking by up to 50% in exchange for a fixed percentage of affordable housing. Parking supply is expensive and drives up development costs, so reducing the number of parking spaces could lower construction costs.

It could also free up land for better building design and other uses — something members of the Missoula Redevelopment Agency noted in a recent proposed apartment project on South Avenue.

As presented, the Casa Loma project would create 132 new housing units. It would also provide 132 parking spaces in a large car park located within the development. Some say it’s not enough parking while others argue it’s too much. A similar debate is taking place around the great Ravara project on Scott Street.

“It would be nice to see some innovative thinking in a parking grid that isn’t all asphalt – asphalt being a heat sink,” said MRA Commissioner Nancy Moe. “Given that temperatures are going to rise, it would be nice to see something on the sustainability side.”

Nate Richmond, a member of the Casa Loma development team, didn’t disagree. Surface parking isn’t ideal, he says, although the options cost money.

“One of the things we assessed for our construction estimator is to consider doing underground parking so we can reduce the size of that surface lot,” he said. “It’s something we’d like to accomplish, but obviously the cost is significant with that.”

Pop-up party rumors say this Jersey Shore town could be next

May 29, 2022

Montana Lending

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ASBURY PARK — Police in a popular Jersey Shore beach town are investigating whether their community is the target of another pop-up party similar to last weekend’s mayhem in Long Branch.

Asbury Park Police said on social networks that it is still working to determine the credibility of message details. Police said the messages advertised a party on Sunday, but did not say where or when.

The department added that it was coordinating with other law enforcement agencies for the safety of residents and visitors.

“There will be zero tolerance for any illegal acts and lewd behavior in reference to this pop-up party or any other future event,” police said.

Police did not immediately respond Sunday morning to a request for an update on the investigation.

Fears of short-lived parties on the Jersey Shore resurfaced after 5,000 people showed up in Long Branch on Saturday, May 21. Authorities said most revelers took the train to get there.

Both Asbury Park and Long Branch are in Monmouth County. NJ Transit train rides between the two coastal cities take less than 15 minutes.

In response, the city implemented a curfew and called for help from nearby law enforcement.

Police in tactical gear responded to disperse the crowd using smoke and a flash bang. 15 people have been arrested, according to the Monmouth County District Attorney’s Office.

Posts on social media have indicated that another pop-up party at Long Branch is scheduled for June 19. A flyer for the event promoted dancing, music and a $1,000 “twerking contest”.

Instagram/@sosactivated

Instagram/@sosactivated

Local officials and state lawmakers said they were working to suppress similar future events.

Public Safety Director Domingos Saldida said the goal was to create a plan to deal with overwhelming crowds that other communities could implement. Saldida added that social media has made it easier for “out of town” groups to coordinate their celebrations.

“When masses show up by NJ Transit and 5,000 people take over Pier Village, it creates a very difficult situation to manage,” Saldida said.

Long Branch Mayor John Pallone said he was considering taking legal action against social media platforms used to promote the parties. It’s unclear exactly what that would entail.

(via stuffed_0live on TikTok /ogden1 on TikTok)

(via stuffed_0live on TikTok /ogden1 on TikTok)

“Our city will not be a place for those who disrespect our city, public spaces, shopping streets with acts of violence, drinking or smoking,” Pallone said.

Senator Vin Gopal, D-Monmouth, said he would introduce a bill to make revelers responsible for the wreckage they leave behind. Gopal, a Long Branch resident, said the legislation would hold parents accountable for the actions of minors.

“Some of these videos I saw were absolutely disgraceful and the amount of litter left on the streets afterwards was disgusting,” Gopal said.

Rick Rickman is a reporter for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach him at [email protected]

Click here to contact an editor about a comment or correction for this story.

NJ Beach Tag Guide for Summer 2022

We are coming another summer to the Jersey Shore! Before you lose yourself in the excitement of sunny days on the sand, we calculate how much seasonal/weekly/daily beach beacons will cost you, and pre-season deals you can still take advantage of!

A glimpse of Alicia Keys’ mansion

WATCH: States with the most new small businesses per capita

Soaring Fertilizer Prices Compress Midwest Farmers | national news

May 28, 2022

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(The Center Square) – Things are getting tougher for the country’s breadbasket, a difficult situation that will likely affect the country’s economy.

In addition to 40-year high inflation and new records being set almost daily at the gas pump for the past two weeks, the price of some agricultural fertilizers has skyrocketed as much as 60% above last year.

“An average 2,500-acre corn and soybean farm has seen its fertilizer bill increase by $175,000 in the last year alone, from $250,000 to $425,000,” said economist Loren Koeman. Chief/Manager of Industry, Conservation, and Regulatory Relations for the Michigan Farm Bureau. Center Square.

This is very bad news for farmers, but also for grocery store customers who buy basic foods like meat, dairy and bread.

The Michigan Legislature has sent a message to lawmakers in Washington to help reduce agricultural fertilizer costs. Rep. Steve Carra, R-Three Rivers, is the author of House Resolution 205. The resolution urges the U.S. Congress, federal agencies and state departments to immediately address the continuing fertilizer price increases and shortages that are severely affecting Michigan farmers.

The Michigan House of Representatives approved the resolution and sent it to the US Congress.

“Farmers play a vital role in Michigan’s history, as well as in today’s culture and economy,” Carra, a member of the House Committee on Agriculture, said in a statement. “There are approximately 10 million acres of farmland in Michigan, and we are home to over 47,000 farms. There are millions of acres of farmland that need to be fertilized.

According to Koeman, the main factors driving up fertilizer prices are:

The war in Ukraine has impacted the supply of fertilizers from Russia and Belarus due to sanctions.

Rising energy prices have a direct impact on nitrogen fertilizers, which are made from natural gas.

Higher shipping costs due to both rising energy costs, labor costs, and limited ship and rail availability. Fertilizers are bulky and often have to be shipped long distances from where they are extracted to where they are used.

Consolidation in the fertilizer industry. For example, just two companies control more than 90% of the US potash market. Fertilizer producers are making record profits. For example, Nutrien’s profits for the last 12 months are almost 10 times greater than the profits for 2020.

Modern farmers have increased the efficiency of fertilizers, optimizing the use of technologies such as GPS to test soils and manage individual crop areas in fields, Koeman explained. It is therefore difficult to further reduce fertilizer use without reducing yields.

In the short term, farmers’ profits are reduced by high fertilizer prices. In the long run, farmers need to make a profit to stay in business, so higher fertilizer costs will have to drive up food prices, Koeman said.

It’s not all bad news for farmers.

“This year, farmers were largely able to offset the higher cost of fertilizers with higher crop prices, due to the supply disruption in Ukraine,” Koeman said. “Farmers are concerned, however, that fertilizer prices will remain high even if crop prices fall back to more normal levels, squeezing profits.”

Michigan Farm Bureau industry relations specialist Theresa Sisung agrees with Koeman.

“With high crop prices, farmers hope to offset some of their additional input expenses with higher selling prices and good yields,” Sisung told The Center Square. “Farmers are sharpening their pencils and being diligent in crop sales, and with the help of Mother Nature, it is still possible to have a positive income this year. There is more concern about future profitability if input prices remain high and we see crop prices start to decline. »

New Bedford announces $3.3 million for local businesses

May 28, 2022

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New Bedford Mayor Jon Mitchell today announced $3.3 million in funding that will support local businesses and entrepreneurs, as part of the city’s commitment to use a portion of funds from the American Rescue Plan Act to help businesses that have been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

“The funding will be split under two separate initiatives,” according to a press release. “NBForward!, which will provide funding to businesses negatively impacted by the pandemic, and NB100!, which will focus on helping start-up entrepreneurs impacted because of their industry or location.”

The funds will be administered by the New Bedford Economic Development Council.

“Entrepreneurs drive opportunity and growth in our economy. Positioning them for success will accelerate New Bedford’s exit from the pandemic,” Mayor Jon Mitchell said. “The New Bedford Economic Development Council has a proven track record of supporting small businesses, and these two new programs will leverage their experience and expertise.

“Connectivity is key to helping small businesses succeed throughout the business lifecycle,” said Anthony Sapienza, president of the New Bedford Economic Development Council. “From start to finish, the two NB100s! and NBForward! are designed to provide not only New Bedford businesses with much-needed financial support to emerge from the pandemic, but also the technical know-how needed to remain viable and vibrant for years to come. »

“No matter where someone is in their entrepreneurial journey – whether they’re a beginner or an established company – at New Bedford, we have a pathway available to them,” he said. declared.

NBForward! will offer at least 100 grants of up to $20,000, as well as assistance with things like business planning, resource tips and best practices, the statement said. Funds can be used for things like construction, renovation, rental or mortgage payments, utility payments, payroll, or insurance, among other options.

NB100! is designed to “promote entrepreneurship, build local wealth and strengthen community ties by helping 100 new businesses get started”, in collaboration with organizations such as EforAll, Groundwork, Co-Creative Center, New Bedford Ocean Cluster, UMass Dartmouth , Bristol Community College and Junior Achievement. Eligible small businesses that complete this technical support program could receive grants of $10,000 from the NBEDC.

It is now the seventh move for distributing the first half of $64.7 million in federal COVID-19 relief funds that New Bedford City Council voted to accept in March. More recently, Mayor Mitchell announced that $1.2 million would be given to New Bedford artists and organizations that support the arts.

Other announcements benefited from a program to upgrade business facades, housing, daycares, small businesses and $5 million to help renovate the Zeiteron Performing Arts Center.

WATCH: States with the most new small businesses per capita

The reason many sports fans don’t like seeing Drake around their favorite team

May 27, 2022

Montana Lending

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In 2022 there was another instance of the Drake Curse, and again it cost Drake money. A lot of money. This time the victim came from the world of Formula 1. Ferrari driver Charles Leclerc had stuck his car in pole position, giving himself a great chance to take a win and extend his championship lead over the 2021 defending champion, Max Verstappen of Red Bull Racing, by Sports News.

Leclerc took a substantial lead, and it looked like the Monegasque driver was on course for an easy flag-light victory for Ferrari. However, according to Sporting News, it all came crashing down on lap 28 when the Ferrari power unit in the rear of his car failed. It was a shock retirement that cost Leclerc the lead in the championship standings, especially when the Ferrari power unit was known for its reliability, for Sports car. However, it quickly became apparent that other forces may be at work.

According Daily mail, ahead of the race, Drake posted a photo of his betting slip on his Instagram story with the caption, “First F1 bet let’s see how it goes.” The bet was CAD$300,000 ($230,000 USD) to win CAD$750,000 ($590,000 USD) that Leclerc would win the Spanish Grand Prix. Fans were quick to notice that it looked like Drake’s curse was still very much alive.

Democratic spokesperson talks about farms, abortions and student loans

May 26, 2022

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On Tuesday’s KGVO Talk Back show, Montana Democratic Party Chairwoman Robyn Driscoll answered tough questions from the audience on a variety of topics.

The first question was about the Democratic Party’s position on abortion, after the recent controversy over the leak of the US Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe v Wade and allegations that the party supports abortion until birth.

“Our party platform supports every woman’s right to make her own health care decisions and that includes abortion,” Driscoll said. “I have to say that I totally disagree with you that the Democratic Party thinks abortion should be done until birth or let a baby die after birth.”

Driscoll was convinced that no matter what the U.S. Supreme Court decides, Montana will always allow a woman to choose an abortion.

“Our state constitution protects that right,” she said. “Montana’s constitutional right to privacy will always protect our right to abortion, and even if there is a special session after this ruling is made, the bill(s) that pass would immediately come before the court and Hopefully, an injunction would be placed on this bill until the court makes a decision. Our party is strongly pro-choice. It’s in our platform.

One listener addressed the issue of student loan forgiveness and how it would be funded. Driscoll said the vast majority of student loans are taken out by people who really need them.

“There are students with life situations where they can’t work three jobs or two jobs or even one job while they’re in college because they may already have a job at home raising their children,” she said. “There are far too many situations in life to say that a person should be able to receive a loan or that they should be able to work and repay their loans. There are far too many real situations.

Another listener compared student loans to government support for farmers.

“Our farmers feed the United States and quite often the world, and so when they have a bad year, the whole United States suffers, not just them,” she said. “I’d rather not see corporations take over our farms and ranches and to do that they certainly need help.”

KGVO also hosts Montana Republican Party Chairman Don Kaltschmidt once a month.

24 Missoula businesses that have closed in the past two years

A large number of Missoula businesses have closed over the past two years for various reasons. Retirement, COVID-19, change of ownership…here’s a list of 24 businesses we’ve lost.

28 Missoula Businesses That Opened, Changed Owners, or Changed Locations

Yes, there were quite a few Missoula businesses that closed in the last two years. But what about the Missoula businesses that have opened?

10 businesses that should open a location in Missoula

We asked, and you answered, and then we thought a bit too. Here are 10 businesses we think should open a location in Missoula, Montana.

New Bedford City Council votes against mayor’s health care plan

May 26, 2022

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When New Bedford Mayor Jon Mitchell delivered his state of the city address last month, he mentioned renegotiating what the city pays for employee health care as one of his priorities. cost reduction. When he presented his $471 million budget to New Bedford City Council last week, he again insisted it was one of the few areas with potential for savings.

On Tuesday evening, the council took up Mayor Mitchell’s third attempt to get the city to pass Sections 21-23 of Chapter 32B of the Massachusetts General Laws, which would allow the city to negotiate these health care costs with public union representatives. through a neutral arbitrator, and for the third time the board rejected it.

First, a vote on whether to send the motion to the council’s finance committee failed 3-7, with councilors Brad Markey, Linda Morad and Ryan Pereria the only votes in favor. A second vote on whether to proceed with the motion was approved 8 to 2, with only councilors Markey and Morad voting against. Ward 4 Councilor Derek Baptiste was not present.

During his weekly appearance on WBSM on Wednesday, Mitchell shared his disappointment with the board’s decision.

“There aren’t a lot of levers the city can use to save taxpayers money on non-discretionary spending. You provide health care, and it’s there, and you have to pay the bill. We provide our employees with very good medical coverage, but we provide it inefficiently,” he said. “State law provides us with the opportunity to negotiate effective and efficient health care for our employees and we have not taken advantage of it.”

Mitchell particularly took issue with the fact that the board didn’t even bring the matter to the finance committee for discussion.

“Not only did they reject it, they didn’t even vote to discuss it. Now think about it,” he said. “The merits of the case should be discussed in open session so that people can weigh the costs and benefits of this, but last night the fire and police unions filled the room in the council chambers, as they have done before when this came, and the councilors come to shoot down not only the measure itself, and I can’t stress this enough, shot down the very opportunity to discuss it.

Mitchell says health care costs for the city have increased by about $1 million a year since 2012, from $35.2 million to $45.7 million, and he expects that these costs increase by another 7% in the immediate future. He said without renegotiating the percentage of an employee’s health care paid by the city, it would result in higher taxes for city residents and business owners.

“Look, the board can’t have it both ways. The council can’t say we’re against raising taxes, but on the other hand, not taking meaningful steps to do something about it,” he said. “Instead they said, ‘No, we’re not even going to discuss it,’ and I think that’s a real problem. It’s going to make it harder in the long run for taxpayers, for taxpayers. municipal services I’m disappointed, but I think all the taxpayers in the city are also disappointed.

City Council chairman Ian Abreu said he voted against the motion because he believed savings could be made without having to refer the matter to arbitration.

“I have always believed that our Public Service Committee exists for one purpose: to work with our administration to analyze costs and to work with our executive to find common ground. All parties need to come together around the table to help find a solution,” Abreu said. “I have very serious concerns about what changing our health care benefits would mean for our retirees, paraprofessionals, food service workers and custodial staff who are already stretched thin. Between 2019 and 2021, the PEC saved taxpayers $2,700,000 in healthcare plan concessions. However, savings only happen when both parties come together and negotiate.

General Counsel Shane Burgo voted against the motion and also cited PEC as a viable option.

“Rising health care costs are a national problem and will not be solved by cutting benefits or increasing out-of-pocket spending. The New Bedford Public Employees Committee (PEC) continues to bargain in good faith, I encourage this administration to do the same,” Burgo said. “PEC has made many concessions that have saved them almost $3,000,000 over the past three years. I will continue to support their bargaining position to negotiate fair and equitable health care.

Ward 3 Councilman Hugh Dunn, who also voted against the motion, suggested an ulterior motive in bringing the idea of ​​negotiating healthcare costs back to council.

“The proposal is a tired and perennial red herring tabled again to distract from administration spending in the annual budget. There has been no tax rate reduction in any municipality where this proposal has been enacted. The only thing that has been cut is essential health care coverage for city workers,” he said. “I support the right of our employees to negotiate their health care – and I refuse to compromise that commitment, especially during a pandemic.”

Mitchell said that despite the council having rejected this motion three times, he will continue to bring it forward until he decides to act.

“What we’re trying to do is not wait for a financial crisis to put in place these useful reforms, these meaningful reforms,” ​​he said. “That’s what we do in New Bedford, wait until there’s a big hole in the roof before we go fix it. I happen to follow the saying fix your roof while the sun is still shining, because we don’t want to get to a point where things are so tight, finances are so tight, that we actually have to cut things that really matter to people or unduly tax taxpayers and/or both.

“That’s why I preach the long term. This is a long-term measure that will put the city on a better footing,” he said. “Unfortunately the council missed that opportunity (Tuesday) evening.”

WATCH: States with the most new small businesses per capita

WATCH: Things from the year you were born that no longer exist

Iconic (and sometimes silly) toys, tech, and electronics have been usurped since their grand entrance, either through technological advancements or common-sense breakthroughs. See how many things on this list trigger childhood memories – and which ones were there and gone so fast you completely missed them.

Local South Jersey restaurant donates thousands of meals

May 25, 2022

Montana Economy

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Foodie Hall in Cherry Hill has only been open since March, but they’ve already donated 7,200 meals through their Meals 4 Meals program. For every meal ordered at Foodie Hall, the company donates a meal to Feeding America, which supports food banks nationwide.

They are on track to deliver 50,000 meals by the end of the year.

It’s not just a whole new food company, but a new takeaway concept. There are seven kitchen brands and types in a 2,000 square foot kitchen. You can get Asian, Mexican, and Italian dishes, as well as a full chicken menu and vegan options.

Photo Dennis Malloy

Photo Dennis Malloy

Yes, they also do great pizzas.

See more here. They plan to add three more full menus to their electronic restaurant variety.

Their culinary direction is a master chef whose list of accomplishments is as long and varied as their menus.

It’s all under the culinary direction of chef Georgeann Leaming, who along with owners Dan Goldberg and Nick Ballias knew they were going to feed a lot of people.

Through Feeding America, Foodie Hall donates meals for every meal ordered from its online restaurant. Feeding America is the largest hunger relief organization in the United States, with 200 food banks and 60,000 pantries and thriving meal programs.

Photo Dennis Malloy

Photo Dennis Malloy

Feeding America serves 40 million people, including 12 million children and seven million seniors nationwide.

Foodie Hall is thrilled with the response to its new premium takeout and delivery concept, and its ability to give back by donating so many meals to those in need. They plan to open more locations in New Jersey as the Cherry Hill location expands.

Based on how many meals they’ve already served their customers and donated to Feeding American, it could happen sooner rather than later.

The views expressed in the above post are those of New Jersey 101.5 talk show host Dennis Malloy only.

You can now listen to Dennis & Judi — On demand! Listen to New Jersey’s favorite Best Friends anytime, anywhere, and any day of the week. Download the Dennis & Judi show wherever you get podcasts, on our free app, or listen now.

Click here to contact an editor about a comment or correction for this story.

WATCH: States with the most new small businesses per capita

Housing boom is making many Mountain West homeowners ‘equity rich’

May 24, 2022

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According to real estate data analyst Attom, there is a record $27 trillion in equity in the United States. In fact, thanks to the overfed housing market, almost half of the owners with mortgages are considered “equity rich” after the first quarter of 2022. This means they owe less than 50% of the market value of their property.

Idaho leads the nation, with nearly 70% of homeowners in the state falling into this category. Utah and Arizona rank third and fourth respectively, where more than 60% of homeowners owe less than half the value of the property. The number is over 50% in Colorado and Nevada, ranked 12th and 13th.

Rick Sharga, executive vice president of market intelligence at Attom, says Mountain West stands out in part because its fast-growing states have attracted an influx of cash buyers snapping up homes.

“What we’ve seen is really a migration of people from higher cost states selling their homes, taking the money and buying bigger homes that are much cheaper in states like Idaho and Utah or Arizona,” Sharga said.

That doesn’t happen as much in Wyoming, where only a quarter of homeowners in the state are considered equity-rich. It is the fifth lowest rating in the country.

Meanwhile, New Mexico saw the largest increase in the number of stock-rich homeowners, rising from 35.3% in the fourth quarter of 2021 to 43.4% in the first quarter of 2022. Montana ranked fifth in this category, rising from 40.5% to 45.7%.

This story was produced by the Mountain West News Bureau, a collaboration between Wyoming Public Media, Nevada Public Radio, Boise State Public Radio in Idaho, KUNR in Nevada, the O’Connor Center for the Rocky Mountain West in Montana , KUNC in Colorado, KUNM in New Mexico, with support from affiliate stations throughout the region. Funding for the Mountain West News Bureau is provided in part by the public broadcasting company.

‘She’s Assignment’ Still Impacting NJ Women in Workforce: Report

May 22, 2022

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Unlike other recessions, the downturn caused by COVID-19 has hit women harder than men economically.

And a new report from Rutgers suggests that women are struggling to regain their status in the workforce, and could continue to do so for some time.

Female unemployment, which peaked at 18.4% in April 2020, has exceeded that of men through the end of 2021, according to the Rutgers Center for Women and Work report.

Most of these women are back at work, but not necessarily back to normal – making significant sacrifices related to the way they work, usually due to childcare issues.

“It’s the part of the ‘She-cession’ that nobody talks about,” said Debra Lancaster, the Center’s executive director. “Thousands of women are sacrificing full-time jobs, higher wages, health insurance and other benefits for the ability to care for young children and aging parents.”

In the last six months of 2021, despite the return to in-person school instruction, 23.1% of families experienced childcare disruptions, according to the report. Women of color and those with low incomes have shouldered the greatest burdens.

At the end of 2021, 5.2% of women held multiple jobs, compared to 4.1% of men, the report notes. In 2018, 4.4% of men held more than one job, compared to 4.3% of women.

“We’re also seeing people cut back on their working hours or having to watch their kids while they work,” said Sarah Small, the report’s co-author and an economist at the Center. “The child care crisis has never gone away for many low-income families.”

The report also highlighted the gender pay gap among those in front-line positions and showed how policies such as federal stimulus payments and the child tax credit have helped families low income – those who received the payments – to afford the essentials in times of uncertainty.

The report makes a number of recommendations to improve conditions for women and their families in New Jersey, such as ensuring the longevity of the child tax credit, strengthening housing protections, improving access and affordability of child care and improving access to mental health services.

Dino Flammia is a reporter for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach him at [email protected]

Click here to contact an editor about a comment or correction for this story.

A glimpse of Alicia Keys’ mansion

WATCH: States with the most new small businesses per capita

States with worst foreclosure rates this year – 24/7 Wall St.

May 22, 2022

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Part of the $2.2 trillion Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, passed by Congress and signed by President Donald Trump in March 2020, included temporary foreclosure and eviction protections for homeowners holding federally guaranteed mortgages. This emergency regulatory safeguard kept millions of Americans at home during the pandemic’s most economically crippling time. (These are the states where most people own their homes.)

Thanks to the continued spike in home prices nationwide, many of these borrowers are holding more equity in their homes than before the global virus outbreak. But not everyone emerged above the water from this abstention lifeline.

According to recent analysis by real estate data provider ATTTOM, foreclosure filings hit a post-pandemic high in the first quarter of 2022 at 78,271, up 39% from the previous quarter and 132% from the same period. period last year. To find the states with the most foreclosures, 24/7 Wall St. looked at 2021 and 2022 foreclosure data provided by ATTOM Data Solutions. States are ranked by the number of foreclosures per 100,000 dwellings.

Foreclosure activity is still 57% lower than it was in the first three months of 2020, but the return to normal is fast approaching. Foreclosures have declined in the 12 months to March 2022 in just three states – Alaska and the Dakotas – while foreclosure activity has jumped more than 200% in five states – New York, New Jersey, Colorado, Nevada and Michigan. Foreclosure activity jumped nearly 500% in Nevada and Michigan. Nationally, foreclosure activity increased by 135%.

Chicago, New York, Los Angeles, Houston and Philadelphia had the highest number of foreclosures. For cities with populations under 200,000, the highest foreclosure rates were in Cleveland, Ohio; Atlantic City, New Jersey; Jacksonville, North Carolina; Rockford, Ill.; and Columbia, South Carolina. (See also the city with the highest housing costs of any state.)

In three states — Wyoming, Louisiana and Mississippi — underwater mortgages accounted for between 10% and 17% of all mortgages, the most among the states. An underwater mortgage is when a home is worth less than the money owed on the mortgage.

Here’s the state with the worst foreclosure rate this year

7 stocks reporting profits the week of May 23, 2022

May 21, 2022

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InvestorPlace – Stock market news, stock advice and trading tips

Tough week for traders. Big wins missed by walmart (NYSE:WMT), Target (NYSE:TGT) and Kohls (NYSE:KSS) left investors in shock and contributed to a strong sell off in the stock marketsincluding the biggest one-day drop in two years on May 18.

Wall Street will be looking for better results in the week ahead as we get first-quarter impressions from the latest major retailers to report, as well as some notable tech companies.

Taken together, earnings reports for the next few days should provide more evidence of how the consumer and economy are holding up as inflation continues to hit a 40-year high and the Federal Reserve prepares to raise interest rates at its next meeting on June 14 and 15. Here are seven stocks reporting profits the week of May 23:

  • best buy (NYSE:BBY)
  • petco (NASDAQ:FRAME)
  • Nvidia (NASDAQ:NVDA)
  • Dick Sporting Goods (NYSE:SDKs)
  • Snowflake (NYSE:SNOW)
  • Ali Baba (NYSE:BABA)
  • Costco (NASDAQ:COST)

Stock reporting earnings: Best Buy (BBY)

Source: Bob Noah / Shutterstock.com

First out is consumer electronics and appliance retailer Best Buy. The Richfield, Minnesota-based company could benefit from some good news. Year-to-date, BBY stock is down 26% to $75.68 per share. The stock price was pulled down along with the wider market. However, the company was recently appointed to investment banking Goldman Sachs (NYSE:GS) safety margin listcomposed of stocks that have attractive valuations and strong balance sheets.

For his winnings next week, analysts expect that Best Buy will report earnings per share (EPS) of $1.64 on revenue of $10.44 billion. Anything better than that, and BBY stock could bounce higher. Currently, the stock is trading near its 52-week low of $72, providing an attractive entry point for investors before or immediately after its results. the median target price on Best Buy stock among 21 analysts who cover the company is currently $120, implying a 57% upside.

Petco (WOOF)

The front of a Petco (WOOF) store in Los Angeles, California.

Source: Walter Cicchetti / Shutterstock.com

Pet retailer and animal welfare company Petco releases its first quarter figures on May 24. Wall Street expects the San Diego, Calif.-based company will report EPS of $0.16 on revenue of $1.46 billion for the January-March period. The company recently announced a retail partnership aimed at attracting dog owners who are also outdoor enthusiasts and particularly enjoy camping.

The partnership is with Backcountry, an online retailer specializing in camping, hiking and outdoor gear. The two companies create a collection of outdoor gear for dogs that participate in outdoor experiences with their owners. Called “Backcountry x Petco,” the collection will be sold at Petco stores as well as the Petco.com and Backcountry.com websites. WOOF stock is down 14% this year at $17.26 per share.

Stock reporting earnings: Nvidia (NVDA)

Nvidia (NVDA) logo and sign on corporate headquarters.  Blurred foreground with green trees

Source: Michael Vi / Shutterstock.com

Semiconductor and microchip giant Nvidia announces its earnings on May 25, and the results will be closely scrutinized on Wall Street. NVDA shares have been hammered this year along with shares of all semiconductor companies as concerns grow over supply chain issues and slowing demand. So far in 2022, NVDA stock has fallen 42% to trade at $175.78 per share. Most analysts say Nvidia stock is a shout buy at current levels. the median target price on stocks is $332.00, suggesting an 89% upside from current levels.

Gaming, artificial intelligence, data centers, self-driving cars and 5G wireless are expected to continue to propel Nvidia’s product sales. The company’s revenue has grown from $4.3 billion in 2013 to $26.9 billion today, making it the world’s largest chipmaker. Analysts seem to agree that Nvidia can keep growing at a steady pace despite current supply chain issues and market volatility. For the first quarter of this year, Wall Street planned that Nvidia will report EPS of $1.29 on revenue of $8.12 billion.

Dick’s Sporting Goods (DKS)

Exterior of Dick's Sporting Goods retail store, including sign and logo.

Source: George Sheldon via Shutterstock

Shares of Dick’s Sporting Goods fell sharply last week, along with the wider retail sector. On May 18, DKS stock fell more than 12% after Walmart and Target sniffed out their first-quarter numbers. The company’s stock price is now down 30% on the year to $80 a share. At its current level, and with a price/earnings ratio (P/E) of just 5, most analysts believe Dick’s stock is undervalued and ripe for the picking. the median target price on the stock price is $137, which would be 70% higher than where the stock is currently trading.

Analysts are looking for Dick’s Sporting Goods will report EPS of $2.46 on revenue of $2.61 billion when it reports quarterly results on May 25. investment bank Morgan Stanley (NYSE:MRS) recently named DKS one of the most “unappreciated post-COVID stocks” and urged investors to add it to their portfolios. As the pandemic settles firmly in our collective rear-view mirrors and summer is fast approaching, Dick’s Sporting Goods should see sales increase.

Stocks Reporting Earnings: Snowflake (SNOW)

Snowflake symbol and logo at the company's headquarters in Silicon Valley.  Stock of SNOW.

Source: various photographs / Shutterstock

Snowflake, another big tech stock that announces its first quarter next week, is the cloud computing data warehousing company. Shares of the Bozeman, Montana-based company were hit harder than most stocks during the market selloff this year. Year-to-date, SNOW stock is down 54% to $151.31 per share, and is now 63% below its 52-week high of $405 per share. Analysts expect the company reports EPS of $0.01 on revenue of $41.76 million for the first quarter of this year.

SNOW stock has also been hit in recent weeks by revelations that another cloud computing giant Selling power (NYSE:RCMP) possesses left his entire position in the business. Salesforce had invested $250 million in Snowflake at the time of the software company’s initial public offering (IPO) in 2020. However, as of the end of the first quarter, Salesforce held no Snowflake shares, according to a regulatory filing, selling all his actions. as the market weakens and falls.

Alibaba (BABA)

Alibaba (BABA) logo on the side of a glass-walled building.

Source: test / Shutterstock.com

Is the worst over for Chinese tech giant Alibaba? After two years of a punitive government crackdown, analysts and investors are cautiously optimistic that authorities in Beijing may finally be drop listed companies, especially large-cap tech stocks. The Chinese government has pledged to support the country’s tech sector and said it backs plans for new internet companies to go public. Many investors are keeping their fingers crossed that e-commerce giant Alibaba can get its business back on track.

Granted, the BABA stock could use a lift. Shares of the Hangzhou-based company are currently trading at $89, down 61% from a 52-week high of $230.89. Investor confidence in Alibaba shares has also been shaken by the prospect that more Chinese companies could be forced to delist from US stock exchangeseither by Chinese authorities or by the United States Securities and Exchange Commission, which applies more rigor to Chinese companies trading in New York. Analysts expect Alibaba reports first-quarter EPS of $1.09 on revenue of $29.53 billion.

Stocks Reporting Earnings: Costco (COST)

Short-term profit taking can lower Costco stock price

Source: Helen89 / Shutterstock.com

Finally, we’ll hear from big-box grocery retailer Costco next week. The major retailer’s earnings are all but certain to influence markets when the Seattle-based company releases its report on May 26. alone to trade at $424 per share. The title is now down 25% over the year. Analysts expect that Costco will report EPS of $3.04 on revenue of $51.38 billion.

The big question for Costco as earnings approach is whether it has been able to pass on the higher costs to its customers? While some retailers, like Home deposit (NYSE:HD) have succeeded, others, such as Walmart, have not.

Costco has been looking for ways to raise prices at its more than 800 locations around the world, including to increase the price of its famous cheap hot dogs. However, the company decided against the move after encountering backlash from customers, who appreciate being able to purchase a hot dog and soda at Costco outlets for $1.50 since the launch of the combo in 1985.

Disclosure: As of the date of publication, Joel Baglole held long-standing roles at MS and NVDA. The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author, subject to InvestorPlace.com Publication guidelines.

The post office 7 stocks reporting profits the week of May 23, 2022 appeared first on InvestorPlace.

The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.

DC Dispatch: Lawmakers disagree on how to address formula shortage | News, Sports, Jobs

May 21, 2022

Montana Mortgages

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Photo by Jared Strong/Iowa Capital Dispatch U.S. Senator Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, addresses a crowd of about 100 people in Denison on April 20.

Iowa officials joined in bipartisan support to help veterans and members of the armed forces re-enter the workforce, as well as advance breast cancer treatment technology for female veterans.

Before the House took a two-week recess, lawmakers also passed legislation to allocate additional funds to address the baby formula shortage.

Shortage of infant formula

Iowa lawmakers disagreed on how best to address a national infant formula shortage.

All Iowa lawmakers supported the Access to Baby Formula Act. The bill directs the U.S. Department of Agriculture to ensure that those dependent on the federal Women, Infants, and Children’s Assistance (WIC) program receive formula at an affordable price.

Sen. Chuck Grassley was one of the co-sponsors of the bill, which passed the Senate unanimously on Thursday and is heading to the president’s desk.

“Today and in the future, we must ensure that all families are able to buy the formula milk needed to feed their infants. That’s why I was proud to support the Infant Formula Access Act, which will help families use the WIC program while taking the necessary steps to prevent a dangerous infant formula shortage from happening again. “Grassley said in a statement.

Rep. Cindy Axne, the only Democrat on the delegation, was the only one from Iowan to support the Infant Formula Supplemental Appropriation Act, which passed the House this week. The bill would allocate $28 million in emergency funds to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to deal with the crisis and prevent future shortages. In Iowa, more than 50% of formulas are out of stock.

“As a mom, I know firsthand how critical it is for families to have access to safe baby formula and the current crisis is leaving families in Iowa and across the country with no one to go to. to turn. I’ve heard stories of parents in my district spending hours trying to find formula, and it’s unacceptable,” Axne said in a press release.

Rep. Ashley Hinson has proposed an alternative plan that would take $5.7 million from unused pandemic funds to address the formula shortage. His plan would also require the FDA to report to Congress on the supply chain shortage.

“The Biden administration ignored warning signs that a formula shortage was imminent, sitting on its hands until the shelves were empty,” Hinson said in a press release. “Their incompetence underscores the need for funding with safeguards and accountability for FDA failures. Throwing extra money at a problem is the wrong approach.

Supporting veterinarians to develop small businesses

A bipartisan bill introduced by Sen. Joni Ernst to help veterans develop their entrepreneurial skills passed the Senate Small Business Committee on Wednesday. Ernst sponsored the Veterans Entrepreneurship Training (VET) Act with Senator Tammy Duckworth, an Illinois Democrat and veteran. The bill creates trade training for serving members of the armed forces and veterans.

In 2021, the Bureau of Labor Statistics found that 386,000 veterans were unemployed, but that number has been declining over time. The VET law would codify the “Boots to Business” program for four years.

“Our service members and their families sacrifice themselves to defend and preserve our country, and for many, the years following their time in uniform can be difficult,” Ernst said in a press release. “We want to create ways to make this transition to civilian life easier by providing them with opportunities that will allow them to succeed not only in the job market, but also in their everyday lives.”

Create health services for female veterans

The Senate and House passed two bipartisan laws to support female veterans. Representative Mariannette Miller-Meeks co-sponsored the SERVICE Act with Republican and Democratic members of the Senate.

The bill would require Veterans Affairs to inform the Senate and House Veterans Affairs Committees of the number of women diagnosed with breast cancer who serve in the armed forces. It would also require the Department of Veterans Affairs to provide mammography screenings to veterans who have been exposed to combustion fireplaces or other toxic exposures. Miller-Meeks told the House on Wednesday that female veterans have a 20 to 40 percent higher risk of breast cancer, and the risk increases when exposed to toxins and burns.

Miller-Meeks also joined Sen. Jon Tester, D-Montana, in introducing the MAMMO for Veterans Act, which passed unanimously in the Senate. This bill would upgrade all 3D mammograms at Veterans Affairs to the highest level of imaging technology and expand research for the treatment of breast cancer.

“Our veterans risked their lives and health in the service of our country. Female veterans are at particular risk for several types of cancer, particularly breast cancer,” Miller-Meeks said in a press release. “As a physician, I have always told my patients that early detection is the key to successful treatment of all types of cancer. I am thrilled to see my two bipartisan bills pass the House today and look forward to seeing them become laws to support female veterans across the country.

Axne to expand affordable post-secondary education for veterans

A bill introduced by Axne in January, the Veteran Student Work Study Modernization Act, passed the House 370-43 on Tuesday. The bill is intended to help part-time student veterans earn certifications or a degree without taking on excessive debt.

“I am thrilled that my legislation passed the House with broad bipartisan support, as our veterans received their benefits while serving,” Axne said in a press release. “We don’t need to put limits on the education of veterans when they have families to support or mortgages to pay.

Iowa Republicans sponsor awards for responsible farming practices

The House Agriculture Committee unanimously passed a bill sponsored by Hinson to create a conservation loan program to adopt environmentally friendly farming practices and technologies. The PRECISE Act (Producing Responsible Energy and Conservation Incentives and Solutions for the Environment) was co-sponsored by Rep. Randy Feenstra and Miller-Meeks.

“This legislation will make it easier for Iowa farmers to access precision farming technology through USDA programs they already know and trust,” Hinson said.

Grassley introduces bill to improve public safety

Grassley joined Democratic Georgia Sen. John Ossoff in introducing legislation to create training for law enforcement officials and first responders called in to deal with mental health cases. The Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and PTSD Law Enforcement Training Act builds on an existing mental health program for people who come into contact with the justice system.

DC Dispatch: Iowa lawmakers disagree on how to address infant formula shortage



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Republican candidates in the final debate for the US House District 1 seat | ABC Fox Missoula

May 21, 2022

Montana Economy

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WHITE FISH, Mont. – Like your hometown election Headquarter, we are counting down to the primary elections in June. RRepublican candidates or the seat of the United States House district in Congress discussed issues affecting ranchers and farmers during their final debate at the Whitefish Performing Arts Center this Friday night.

Each contestant was asked to answer questions about various issues affecting farmers and ranchers in Montana, one of them being mental health.

In one question, candidates were asked how they would address this lingering crisis among farmers and ranchers, especially in rural Montana.

Here’s what they had to say.

“We in the room can do better on the scene, the political scene, the economic scene, we can do better and I also think when you go into the economy they face an economy that we never have been faced before. if they go to a school and work at the job for 10 years, that job may never exist, which actually creates more tension and questions, they go to bed more anxious than ever before,” said Matt Jette, (R)House District candidate.

“It’s a crisis on every level and it comes out of desperation and so it comes down to education and I think again when an individual is cross-trained and self-sufficient they can be successful in another area if a guy company is closing down. they have one backup and go to another,” said House District (R) candidate Mitch Heuer.

“As the only physician in the state legislature for the past 8 years, my role was to push, shoot, kill and carry bills that supported suicide prevention and education that worked on substance abuse and mental health. What we’re learning is there’s a lot we can do at the state level, but the big issue comes down to reimbursement,” said district candidate Al Olszewski. of House (R).

“When they’re told they have to do things with their bodies, I think that’s wrong, it’s overreaching government and we need to look at the bigger picture to find out why the suicide rate is so high. and I really think it’s because of government-reach and people have to go back to managing their own lives, managing their own issues and not being dependent on government,” said Mary Todd (R) House District candidate.

To see the answers to all the questions posed to candidates, you can head to our streaming news channel.

Financial literacy courses could become a requirement in Montana schools next year | News

May 20, 2022

Montana Loans

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When Butte resident Mike Paffhausen graduated from Carroll College in 2009, he received a thin, purple school book that he says changed his life. It was called “Life After Graduation: Your Guide to Success”.

Paffhausen then made a to-do list on a few blank pages at the back of the book, filled with items the book recommended. The list spanned a page, plus a few, and included items such as “buy life insurance”, “create a budget” and “make a will”.

Today, he still has the book and has crossed off every item on the list within the first two years of reading it.

The book and the lessons learned from it were pivotal in Paffhausen’s life, he said, and after that he became determined to have other young adults benefit from those lessons.

“Finances are like sex, religion and politics,” Paffhausen said. “We don’t talk about it at the table anymore; it’s inappropriate and taboo, and it shouldn’t be. And that’s really inappropriate in those families where they’re not good at money. So we perpetuate poverty.

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Paffhausen’s many efforts to improve financial literacy in the community include working with Carroll, local high schools, through his church, and even fundraising to continue buying books for future seniors.

In the summer of last year, he told the board of directors of the National Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors of Montana, of which he is a member, his goal of getting guaranteed personal finance courses for every high school student in Montana. Paffhausen and other proponents refer to it as guaranteed rather than mandatory — like all high schools, students are guaranteed a financial literacy course.

Paffhausen has connected with Next Gen Personal Finance, a nonprofit that he says has worked with him and the NAIFA MT board for almost the entire year to make their goal a reality. Paffhausen was introduced to Carly Urban, an economist with a Ph.D. in economics and associate professor at Montana State University in Bozeman, via Next Gen.

In October 2021, Paffhausen spoke at the Montana Association of Business Professionals of America’s Fall Leadership Conference as part of NAIFA MT. Paffhausen said he spoke at a roundtable with teachers about the organization of guaranteed financial literacy classes in high schools in Montana, and they were all “resoundingly supportive,” which he said. urged him and the NAIFA MT Board to continue.

He became president of the National Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors Montana in January.

On Tuesday, Urban, who is a senior researcher in the field, presented her findings on guaranteed personal finance classes in schools at the 2022 NAIFA MT State Convention at the Fairmont Hot Springs Conference Center near Anaconda, where NAIFA MT members who were not on the board were present.

About Literacy Classes

The idea behind financial literacy in schools is that high school graduates have to make many very important financial decisions when they graduate and should educate themselves about money before they start doing so.

The case for financial literacy, Urban said during his presentation, is in his favorite thing: data. According to his research, only 27% of 23-28 year olds can correctly answer three basic questions about interest, inflation and diversification.

“And when I say basic questions, I mean, ‘You have $100 today, the interest rate is 2%, how much money will you have next year? Will you have more than $100, exactly $100 or you don’t really know? Said Urban.

She said her research also revealed that 54% of student borrowers did not calculate their future monthly payments before choosing a loan and, one statistic she found very telling: 38% of 18-34 year olds said they had used alternative financial solutions. services, such as payday loans, over the past five years.

Urban called these alternative financial services a “debt trap for young people”.

“If you want to make sure you can never start a small business as a young adult, or in your life, start the payday cycle,” she said.

When his research looked at states that guaranteed financial literacy courses as a condition of graduation, it showed that the first class had no change in credit scores by age 23 and had a decrease 1.4% of unpaid bills over 90 days. The second cohort achieved a 16 point improvement in credit score and a 3.4% decrease in delinquency over 90 days, and the third cohort experienced a 32 point increase in credit score and a decrease in 5.8% of delinquency over 90 days according to age. 23. Urban called the results of the third cohort of high school students “enormous.”

His research also shows that people want financial literacy courses in schools, with 88% of respondents to a 2022 survey saying high school students should be required to take a semester or year-long course on financial literacy. personal finances.

Student loan repayment rates for first-generation and low-income students and the shift from high-cost to low-cost borrowing methods have also increased with guaranteed financial literacy courses, and payday loans have declined. Students who had guaranteed financial literacy courses in high school were also 21% less likely to have a credit card balance. Moreover, his research found that students from low-income families were helped the most by this requirement.

However, Urban said, there is no evidence that guaranteed financial literacy courses increase the likelihood of opening a retirement account, non-retirement savings account or owning a home.

She said it’s because at 16, 17, and 18, most students think about what’s going on right now, like car loans and student loans, and they’re not ready to think yet. retired or owning a home.

The guaranteed personal finance courses also do not change graduation rates, college attendance rates, college completion rates, income, or work location.

According to Urban’s presentation, eight states across the country are guaranteeing financial literacy classes to every high school student, and five more are in the early stages of implementation.

The reason these courses should be required instead of optional, Urban said, is because research shows that making it optional makes no difference to students’ future credit scores, borrowing habits, and more. or delinquency rates.

Paffhausen said that in addition to the other sought-after benefits of guaranteed financial literacy classes, another good thing is that it’s a non-partisan cause that everyone he’s spoken to supports.

State of courses in Montana

Eight schools in Montana currently require financial literacy to be taught, including Absarokee High School, Anaconda Sr. High School, Box Elder High School, Hamilton High School, Polson High School, St. Ignatius High School, Sweet Grass County High School, and Victor High school, according to Urban’s presentation.

About three weeks ago, Paffhausen said, the efforts he and the NAIFA MT board put in paid off. Paffhausen and Urban were able to meet Elsie Arntzen, Superintendent of Public Instruction of Montana, and found her a home for their cause.

According to documents from the Montana Office of Public Instruction, updated Montana Administrative Rules Chapters 55, 57, and 58, which include guaranteed financial literacy classes for high school students, would go into effect in January 2023. they were adopted.

Currently, four units of English Language Arts, three units of Mathematics, three units of Science, three units of Social Studies, two units of Career and Technical Education, two units of Arts, one health, two units of world languages ​​and two units of electives.

Proposed rule changes include adding a required half-credit of civics or government education in all three social studies units and adding a required half-credit of economics and financial education in all three social studies units or both vocational and technical study units. education, according to OPI documents.

Urban’s research shows that social studies is actually the best course for implementing financial literacy, not math, as some people might think.

There will be challenges, said Paffhausen, and these will mostly be “strategic and tactical issues” of course implementation, such as training existing teachers to teach personal finance and finding space for new content in the secondary program.

According to research on required personal finance courses in Peru, course teachers also benefit. The instructors involved in the Peru study saw their savings increase after teaching the class because they, too, learned about personal finance in a more fun and digestible way than personal finance is sometimes explained to adults.

The cost to schools can also be free, Urban said, with Next Gen Personal Finance offering free, high-quality teacher training and certification, as well as a free curriculum.

Arntzen also said she will make personal finance units available as part of the 60 units teachers must complete every five years to maintain an active teaching license.

Paffhausen said NAIFA MT is the right organization to champion this cause. “Which organization is best suited to bring this conversation to the fore? ” he said. “Everyone in this room has had clients in front of us who we wish we had had a better start and had a simple, fundamental education about how money works.”

And while NAIFA MT is an advocacy organization, Paffhausen said promoting guaranteed personal finance courses does not directly benefit them.

“Society doesn’t know who NAIFA Montana is and never will,” he said. “We have no discernible earnings advantage in this area.”

As for his own children, he said, they will learn financial literacy anyway. But he said he believed in this cause for all the other kids who might not, and ultimately because it’s a good thing to do.

Allow taxes to rise, then give credits to some

May 20, 2022

Montana Lending

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TRENTON — Taxes that businesses pay into the unemployment fund are set to rise in July and again next summer, but the legislature could take steps to ease that financial bite.

A bill (A3683/2152) advanced by the Assembly’s Committee on Commerce and Economic Development on Thursday would not eliminate a projected $216 million tax increase due in the fiscal year that begins in six weeks. Instead, it would give certain companies tax credits equal to the increase, offsetting the impact.

Assemblyman Roy Freiman, D-Somerset, said more than 70 percent of New Jersey businesses would benefit from the bill, which offers no respite for large employers.

“What we’re doing here is good for our business community,” Freiman said. “We’re telling them, listen, we realize that the increases that are currently planned will have a negative effect, and with this bill, we will in effect give them a tax credit for all these increases that they may incur. »

Assemblyman Bob Auth, R-Bergen, said the bill is unnecessarily complicated and some small businesses won’t have time to deal with the appropriations.

“They’re just going to drop him through the cracks. That’s not what we want to do here. You don’t want to do that here either,” Auth said. “You want to bring immediate relief to these people. And that’s what we should be doing, so this particular aspect of this bill is flawed.

The bill would provide tax credits that business owners could use to lower their corporate or income tax bills over the next seven years. They would be available from tax years 2023 and 2024, based on potential increases in unemployment insurance premiums seen between July 2022 and June 2024.

The bill also puts $375 million into a fund that would be used to repay federal loans used to pay unemployment benefits. This loan currently has no balance, but further borrowing is planned – which could lead to increased federal business taxes, if the loan has a balance in the last seven weeks of 2022.

Business groups pushing the state to use billions in federal funds to avoid payroll tax increases support the scaled-back alternative.

“Understanding the art of compromise, there is no perfect bill,” said Michael Egenton, executive vice president of the New Jersey Chamber of Commerce. “Would we rather have seen other components of this one?” Sure. But at the same time, it is something that is desperately needed.

Sheila Reynertson, senior policy analyst for New Jersey Policy Perspective, objected, saying the bill was unnecessary given the state of the economy and that the legislature was paying too much attention to corporations.

“Essentially another giveaway to cover a modest cost that they’re already being charged to pay and diverts resources that people, especially those who are still laid off, need right now,” Reynertson said.

Under the bill, the Department of Labor and Workforce Development would have to provide at least 30 days notice to employers when the unemployment insurance tax rate changes. They were told after last year that the hike had already started – although they knew more than six months earlier that a hike was coming, but not their exact rate.

The bill now heads to the Assembly Appropriations Committee for further consideration.

Michael Symons is the Statehouse Bureau Chief for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach him at [email protected]

Click here to contact an editor about a comment or correction for this story.

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NJ AG warns of price gouging and fraud involving infant formula

May 19, 2022

Montana Economy

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On Thursday, New Jersey Acting Attorney General Matthew Platkin clarified what the state of emergency Governor Phil Murphy declared on Tuesday due to an ongoing shortage of baby formula means for merchants who may want to increase their profits with this coveted and essential item.

In a statement, the attorney general’s office said Murphy’s order enforces the state’s predatory pricing law, prohibiting for the duration of the state of emergency and 30 days after any increase in price higher than 10% of what the price was before. urgency.

The OAG said the state Consumer Affairs Division has received “approximately” 16 consumer complaints about the infant formula price hike to date, about half of them in less than three days since publication of the decree.

Each individual sale is considered a separate violation, according to the OAG. A first offense carries a civil penalty of up to $10,000, with the fine increasing to $20,000 for the second and subsequent offenses.

Violators may also be subject to the payment of restitution to consumers, as well as attorney and investigation fees, according to the statement.

The OAG said specific scams to watch out for include offering or selling expired infant formula, or any transaction that requires a wire transfer.

As the state Poison Control Center also suggested earlier Thursday, parents should consult with their baby’s pediatrician before changing the formula.

Price gouging of infant formula in New Jersey can be reported by filling out an online form or by calling 1-800-242-5846 to request a complaint form by mail.

Patrick Lavery is a reporter and anchor for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach him at [email protected]

Click here to contact an editor about a comment or correction for this story.

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Broker confidence in New York fell in the first quarter

May 19, 2022

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Broker confidence in New York fell for a third consecutive quarter but remained in positive territory, according to the latest survey from the Real Estate Board of New York (REBNY).

But the drop was largely due to the outlook for brokers in the residential market: the current confidence index for the sector fell from 50.63 to 31.41 in the first quarter, while the current confidence index for businesses was essentially stable.

Contrary to the latest reports, however, COVID-19 was not solely responsible for the decline in confidence. Residential brokers suggest that the residential market may moderate on the back of rising interest rates and mortgage rates; the latter metric hit 5% for 30-year mortgages in March, a record high since the fall of 2018.

On the trading front, brokers have expressed concern about a delayed return to work as well as quality of life issues, despite large employers recently signing up and executing first-quarter return-to-work plans. . Office occupancy in New York was 37% in mid-April, according to Kastle Systems, compared to 22% at the end of January. However, this figure still lags behind the average occupancy among the 10 largest metropolitan areas monitored by Kastle.

Six-month expectations were even gloomier, down 17% for commercial brokers and 20% among residential professionals, but the overall outlook was still better than at the start of the pandemic, when commercial and residential indices of REBNY were -33.74 and -64.32, respectively. .

Some factors suggest a positive trend for New York, including a narrowing of the gap between subway and bus ridership and ridership on the LIRR and Subway North and a doubling of gross ticket sales for Broadway shows between the last week of January and mid-April. Restaurant occupancy has improved from 70% below pre-pandemic levels in January to around 40% below new pandemic levels now.

Brokers say critical issues that need to be addressed to sustain progress this year include tackling quality of life issues such as crime, transit safety and sanitation management, local incentives supporting companies and the control of inflation.

“The major challenges facing the brokerage community have thankfully moved away from unprecedented public health concerns,” Keith DeCoster, REBNY Marketa’s chief data and policy officer, said in a statement.. “Economic momentum and broker confidence should remain in positive territory, particularly if policymakers continue to prioritize quality of life issues and empower homeowners and businesses to invest more in New York City. “

A “more consistent and sustained” returning to the office will also be necessary to boost the minds of trading brokers, according to the survey, but despite this, the demand for Class A assets and trophies with updated equipment remains high.

“Although the New York office market is experiencing significant headwinds, including a historically high availability rate, and many workers are still hesitant to return to the office, there is undeniably very strong occupant demand for space in the best office properties in premium locations,” said Bill Montana of Savills.

Politeness a winning strategy on Idaho primary day

May 18, 2022

Montana Loans

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I remember hearing the story of a man who moved to Idaho and took a job in school administration. During his first weeks in town, he was amazed when he walked the streets and strangers greeted him. They made eye contact, said hello, and often asked how her day was going. It was a culture shock. He had come from an urban environment where people rarely looked each other in the eye and as if to remind you that they were aware of your presence. Like a defense mechanism.

Fact cool idaho also applies to politics? Perhaps we have new evidence.

A smile opens doors

Raul Labrador was right. He said Monday he had seen three polls and one had him winning a primary for state attorney general by 14 points. It was perfect. He also refrained from calling his opponents. He represents a wing of the party that I wouldn’t call the establishment. Yet in other statewide races, his team has failed on every level. Was it because they weren’t positive?

Over the past two years, I have heard many non-establishment candidates call Governor Brad Little a tyrant or Little chicken. First, it sounds childish coming from a candidate. Brad Little can be a lot of things his opponents don’t like, but his public persona is very jovial. His campaign ads were all positive and he was generally smiling.

Positive campaigns and positive thinking

I received about 14 tons of political mailings before Primary day (a slight exaggeration) and every time I saw a mailing from the Labrador campaign, he always beamed with a smile.

As of this writing, Glenneda Zuiderveld has a narrow lead over Jim Patrick for the State Senate in District 24. She told me last week that the two get along very well at candidate forums. . Both are people who smile easily. She had a TV ad where she stood on the steps of the Capitol and calmly explained her faith and conservative roots. She did not speak ill of the holder. There may be lessons here for future candidates.

I jokingly told Labrador on Monday that name-calling should be left to the talk show hosts. He’s laughing.

WATCH: States with the most new small businesses per capita

LOOK INSIDE: Derek Jeter is selling his beautiful Hudson Valley lakeside chateau for a discount

US States Struggle to Replace Tax Revenue from Fossil Fuels | News, Sports, Jobs

May 17, 2022

Montana Economy

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AP Photo/Jeri Clausing, File Oil rigs sit in the Loco Hills field along US Highway 82 in Eddy County near Artesia, NM, one of the busiest areas in the Permian basin.

SANTA FE, NM (AP) — Government budgets are booming in New Mexico: Teacher salaries are up, residents can go to state college tuition-free, mothers will get medical care for a year postpartum and criminal justice initiatives are funded to reduce urban violence.

The reason behind the spending spree – oil. New Mexico is the second largest producer of crude oil among US states and the top recipient of US remittances for fossil fuel production on federal lands. But a budget filled with oil cash has a side effect: it also highlights how difficult it is to turn state rhetoric about fighting climate change into reality.

State governments in key regions of the country for oil, natural gas and coal production have by far the highest per capita reliance on fossil fuels – led by Wyoming, North Dakota, Alaska and the New Mexico. Revenue funds essential public services, from road maintenance to prisons. In Carlsbad, New Mexico, property taxes on oil infrastructure are securing a high school performing arts center, expanded sports facilities and elementary school renovations.

None of this would be possible without oil revenue, said schools superintendent Gerry Washburn.

“We can’t slow down on this and what we’re doing to fund schools until we have a legitimate replacement” for oil and natural gas revenues, he said. “Whether you’re in the middle of the oil patch or in an area with no oil and gas drilling, these policies will impact the revenue of every school district in the state.”

Federal, state and local governments receive about $138 billion a year from the fossil fuel industry, according to a study by nonpartisan Washington-based economics group Resources for the Future, which does not advocate energy policies. This equals the annual spending of New York State and Texas combined.

Cash flow is dominated by retail taxes on gasoline and diesel in each state, but energy-producing states are most dependent on fossil fuel revenues through a range of taxes, levies, rental and fee sales. Because these revenues help pay for government services, they tend to tax residents less, said Daniel Raimi, a fellow at Resources for the Future and co-author of the study.

“It’s a really difficult dynamic if you’re thinking about moving away from fossil fuels,” he said. “They are going to be faced with the question: are we going to increase our taxes on our residents or do we have to reduce the level of services that we provide? »

In New Mexico, oil and gas make up 42% of state government revenue, a share rising amid war in Ukraine and record oil production in the Permian Basin that stretches across southeastern New Mexico and western Texas. Additional oil revenues are paid into a new interest-bearing trust for early childhood education.

Skyrocketing profits from the fossil fuel industry have also given the Democratic-controlled New Mexico Legislature a chance to try to tackle the nation’s highest unemployment rate and the persistence of a high poverty. Lawmakers gave $1.1 billion in tax breaks and direct payments of up to $1,500 per household to offset inflation.

At the same time, lawmakers have balked this year over climate initiatives that could curb oil production. They rejected a bill to limit pollution linked to global warming in the production and distribution of transportation fuels, a measure taken by West Coast states. New Mexico also avoided a state constitutional amendment for the right to clean air.

Democratic Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham, re-elected in November, said her administration was working to contain methane pollution from oilfields and diversify the economy. New mandates provide for the production of electricity from solar, wind and other renewable sources. But she warned the federal government against deep restrictions on oil exploration and production, which are still the cornerstone of the state budget.

“We can work very effectively with oil and gas producers to meet clean energy standards…while managing some pretty incredible fossil fuel exploration to meet the world’s current energy demands,” the governor said in April.

Preserving revenue from oil, natural gas or coal production while acting on climate change can be especially tricky in blue states where Democrats often campaign to fight global warming.

Colorado Democratic Governor Jared Polis is pursuing an ambitious clean energy plan while trying to preserve $1 billion in annual tax revenue from oil and gas production. To justify air pollution restrictions, Polis cited real-time evidence of climate change, drought and fires.

But Polis, a wealthy tech entrepreneur, threatened last year to veto a proposal that could impose a per-tonne emissions fee on polluters. William Toor, executive director of the governor’s Colorado Energy Office, said the state is not targeting fossil fuel production, only emissions from industry.

On the plains of northeastern Colorado, Weld County Commission Chairman Scott James said state regulations are stifling new drilling needed to support production and government revenues, especially for the schools. The county is centered on a vast oil field stretching from the Denver area to Wyoming and Nebraska.

“I agree with the overall mission to reduce greenhouse gases, but there is an environment that exists in the State Legislature where we have to electrify everything, we have to mandate it, we have to do it now”, said James. “And these technologies are not ready for prime time yet. We just don’t have the capacity to do that.

Rural and economically isolated communities may have a harder time adjusting to a low-carbon economy, said Kristin Smith, a Montana-based Headwaters Economics researcher and economist who studies public finance in the Bakken oil region. , North Dakota. She anticipates “Very difficult decisions” on cuts to areas like public health care and policing.

Some major oil-producing states are moving forward with their climate programs.

Pennsylvania in April became the first major fossil fuel state to adopt a carbon pricing policy, joining an 11-state regional consortium that sets a falling price and limits on carbon dioxide emissions from power plants.

Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf’s move comes without the approval of the Republican-controlled legislature in the nation’s No. 2 state for natural gas production — and a major exporter of gas-generated electricity. A per-well drilling royalty on the booming Marcellus shale gas industry has rained cash on rural counties and municipalities for nearly a decade.

South of Pittsburgh, Washington County has raised more than $100 million over the past decade. This equates to $500 per capita — a “game changer,” said County Council Chairwoman Diana Irey Vaughan. The manna paid, among other things, for the improvement of parks and bridges.

Democratic State Representative Greg Vitali, an advocate for stronger action on climate change, said local governments dependent on gas drilling money will simply have to use traditional tools such as property taxes to make it out.

Republican-dominated Wyoming, the top coal-producing state, has bold goals to cut greenhouse gas emissions to below zero, even though fossil fuels make up more than half of its revenue.

This vision hinges on eventually capturing carbon dioxide from coal and gas-fired power plants and pumping it underground, possibly to increase oil production in aging fields in the center of the state. Wyoming leaders are also turning to alternative fuels like hydrogen and nuclear power, using reactors that produce less waste.

Meanwhile, a decade of declining demand for coal has sapped government revenue. Republican Gov. Mark Gordon signed a coal tax cut in March, giving up about $9 million a year to help the coal industry remain economically viable.

The state – one of only two that does not tax personal income, corporate income or gross receipts – must eventually come to terms with its dependence on fossil fuel money, said Jennifer Lowe, executive director of the Equality State Policy Center, a government watchdog group.

“At some point, there is going to have to be a time for Jesus to come,” Lowe said.



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A little spring cleaning – NMP

May 16, 2022

Montana Mortgages

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* Moving on, the article I wrote about criminals (October 2021) plying their trade in the housing industry has been widely read. And the scammers keep giving. Here are some of their latest gambits:

A former Miami realtor, formerly of Century 21, has been charged with the murder of two homeless people last fall and the attempted murder of a third in December. He was filmed at several stages of the murders, including shooting one man and then another. He was driving a car registered in his name. “We literally followed in the suspect’s footsteps,” Deputy Police Chief Armando Aguilar told the Miami Herald…

Tamara Dadyan, a Los Angeles real estate broker, was sentenced to more than 10 years in prison after pleading guilty to her role in the Payment Protection Program fraud, the small business relief program, to the tune of nearly of $20 million. Dadyan and his compatriots used dozens of fake or stolen identities to apply for loans, including those of elderly or deceased people. And they used the proceeds to buy luxury homes, designer handbags, clothes, and even a Harley. Now, as she sits behind bars, she awaits trial for state mortgage fraud…

A disbarred Massachusetts attorney and his wife have pleaded guilty to running several mortgage fraud schemes. In a ruse, Barry Wayne Plunkett Jr. and his wife, Nancy, both of Barnstable, defrauded six lenders and 14 refinance homeowners and kept $900,000 for their own purposes. They also used various names, entities and false documents to obtain three successive mortgages on their own house in Hyannis Port for amounts of $412,000, $470,000 and $1.2 million…

Pastor Brandon Huber, a part-time agent at Windermere Real Estate in Missoula, Montana, withdrew his congregation’s support for the local food aid program because it was promoting LGBTQ+ pride and rights week. Someone filed an ethics complaint with the Missoula Organization of Realtors, alleging a violation of the Nation Association of Realtors’ Code of Ethics. And Huber sued MOR right away.

It’s not a crime in itself, but the pastor’s attorney said: “The real estate agent hate speech rule is meant to purge Christians from the real estate industry. If you’re a Christian who believes like tens of millions of American Christians, that homosexuality is wrong, there’s simply no way you can participate as a real estate agent, with the kind of ban on hate speech that exists.

This guy should move to Florida…

Maybe he had nothing else to do. John MacMillan Cameron, a broker from Port Orchard, Washington, whose license is currently inactive, has pleaded not guilty to federal charges related to the January 6, 2021 Capitol insurrection. It appears that he posted this message on his site to believers: “The least safe I felt was when I was coming back to catch a train…I was told FU by a little antifa BLMer on a Vespa going in the opposite direction…”

Thank you Zillow for helping build a case against former Green Beret and former Florida congressional candidate Jeremy Brown for attacking the Capitol on January 6, 2021. Brown had previously been on the FBI’s radar as a potential leader of the Oath Keepers. But to prove their case, authorities focused on listing his Tampa residence on the popular search engine. A listing photo showed a whiteboard listing all sorts of listings allegedly related to the riot.

FBI agents raided the house, where they discovered a short-barreled shotgun, a sawed-off shotgun, over 8,000 rounds of ammunition and two hand grenades…

* I warned of inflation, the mortgage market’s equivalent of a four-letter word, last July. As an economist, which I am certainly not, I could have been right or wrong. Turns out I was the latter.

In mid-March, the Federal Reserve Board made the first of what are expected to be many increases of a quarter point or more this year in the federal funds rate. With inflation nearing 8% at the time of this writing, Mortgage Bankers Association Chief Economist Mike Fratantoni said of the widely expected initial 25 basis point increase: “It’s what the Fed needs to do to control inflation. ”

Fed Chairman Jerome Powell said in prepared remarks to the National Association for Business Economics that “inflation is way too high.” And for what it’s worth, the central bank doesn’t expect inflation to drop below 2% until “after 2024” at the earliest…

* When I last looked at the Latino market (June 2021), I reported that most of Hispanics’ wealth came from real estate. Now, the latest State of Hispanic Homeownership report, released in early March, shows Latinos added 657,000 homeowner households between 2019 and 2021, bringing their homeownership rate to 48.4%.

This is still on the low side compared to other demographics. Worse still, it only accounted for 20.6% of total ownership growth over the two-year period.

At the same time, however, “significantly” more Hispanics are looking to buy their first home than the population as a whole, according to a survey by Realtor.com in conjunction with the National Association of Hispanic Real Estate Professionals. NAHREP also produces the State of Hispanic Home Ownership report.

* Last month’s article focused on the influx of institutional investors into the housing market. I’ve since found these stats buried in an ATTOM Data report: Institutional investors nationwide accounted for 6.9%, or one in 14 single-family home and condo sales in 2021, the highest level since 2013.

Meanwhile, there is an upward trend among investors to build as well as buy homes for rent. According to the National Rental Home Council, homes purposely built for rental rather than sale accounted for 26% of properties added to investors’ portfolios in the fourth quarter. This represents an increase from just 3% in the third quarter of 2019. At the same time, purchases of existing single-family homes by investors fell from 81% to 57% over the same two-year period.

“Providers have increasingly turned to new housing development over the past two years as a way to respond to housing market supply constraints and a corresponding increase in demand for single-family rental housing,” the trade group said in a press release…

* A Naples, Florida property management company sued for embezzlement by several of its homeowners’ association clients could also come into Uncle Sam’s crosshairs for taking nearly a quarter of a million dollars in federal COVID relief funds. When American Property Management Services requested PPP money, the request required certification that it was not “engaged in any activity unlawful under federal, state, or local law.” According to some legal beagles, the feds can sue, even if the company wasn’t involved in criminal activity when it applied for a PPP loan…

That’s all for the moment. My basket is full.

Spadea’s Small Business Monday – Your Local Favorites

May 16, 2022

Montana Loans

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Every Monday we celebrate New Jersey’s small businesses.

Small businesses are the backbone of our economy with nearly a million people working accounting for half of the workers in the Garden State.

For years, New Jersey has ranked bottom for the business climate with last year, earn a good last place.

There is no doubt that we need a major upheaval in Trenton to bring about serious and lasting change. Lower taxes, reverse the governor’s current trend of placing the burden of replenishing the unemployment insurance fund on local businesses. This resulted in a billion dollar corporate tax hike instead of using the federal stimulus dollars that other states were using to replenish the fund.

The government of New Jersey is definitely working against people and family businesses. The bag ban has made shopping inconvenient and imposes excessive burdens on elderly and disabled shoppers. And, as I wrote before, it all came without any solid scientific or logical reason for its implementation.

In addition to outrageous and unnecessary taxes and regulations, there is the constant drumbeat of fear based on nonsensical discussion of “COVID transmission” rates. Much of this is based on the constant testing of “asymptomatic” (i.e. healthy) people who really have no public health implications. Yet the fear campaign continues to make the public climate even more difficult for businesses that rely on foot traffic.

That said, I will continue to do my part by dedicating Monday’s shows to promoting small businesses and helping out as best I can before we are able to change the climate and make this state a safe haven for small businesses. companies. Stay tuned.

Here is a list of businesses that have come to our attention through the free New Jersey 101.5 app!

Princeton Inquiry Health in Lawrenceville, New Jersey

Noblo umbrella packaging from Eatontown, NJ

Tuzio’s Italian cuisine in Long Branch, New Jersey

Fire station restaurant and pub in Rahway, New Jersey

The above post reflects the thoughts and observations of Bill Spadea, host of New Jersey talk show 101.5. All opinions expressed are those of Bill. Bill Spadea is on the air weekdays from 6-10 a.m., speaking from Jersey, taking your calls at 1-800-283-1015.

WATCH: States with the most new small businesses per capita

NJ Beach Tag Guide for Summer 2022

We are coming another summer to the Jersey Shore! Before you lose yourself in the excitement of sunny days on the sand, we calculate how much seasonal/weekly/daily beach beacons will cost you, and pre-season deals you can still take advantage of!

New England single mother is speechless after receiving gigantic tip

May 16, 2022

Montana Lending

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According to UPI.comJennifer Vernancio has been a waitress at a pizzeria in Cranston, Rhode Island called Big Cheese & Pub for three and a half years.

She is a single mother of a 16 year old daughter and a 3 year old son.

She told the news site that caring for her children and earning an income amid the pandemic has been difficult, to say the least.

It turns out that she had a particularly stressful day. Her 3-year-old felt sick, which meant he couldn’t go to daycare. This left Jen scrambling for a babysitter, which made her late for work. Fortunately, the pizzeria where she works is incredibly accommodating and helps her whenever she can.

Jen arrived at work exhausted and her very first table of the day changed everything. A husband and wife were warm and kind and asked Jen about herself. They ordered a few sandwiches, salads and drinks. As they walked out, they thanked Jen and told her to have a great day! She went over to where they were sitting and saw that they had left her an $810 tip on a check for $48!

She was absolutely speechless. The amount of money was extremely generous, but beyond that, the act of kindness from complete strangers left her overwhelmed and so grateful. When you’re unlucky and life seems really hard for you, if someone shows you a little humility, it can completely change things.

Jen used the money to buy her daughter a new pair of shoes, and her son is getting a toy police truck. She will use the rest of the money to pay the bills. She never got the couple’s name, but it’s safe to say she’ll never forget what they did for her when she needed it most.

WATCH: States with the most new small businesses per capita

Common Ground of New Jersey helps those who lose a loved one

May 15, 2022

Montana Economy

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No one can deny that the past two years with the pandemic have caused major disruption and upended our lives for what seemed like an eternity. Our hospitals were full and some of our patients succumbed to the virus and died.

It was reported this week that the death toll from the covid virus has soared to 1,000,000. That’s an incredible number.

Tero Vesalainen

Tero Vesalainen

The Common Ground Grief Center located in Manasquan provides support in a safe place where grieving children, teens, young adults and their families can come together and share their experiences as they begin the grieving process. They have many programs that provide this support and volunteers to help those grieving a death.

Common Ground provides just that, common ground for those who have experienced death close to them, and their programs offer the opportunity for those who are grieving to share and discuss their inner thoughts with others going through similar pain. It is necessary therapy.

Most of us have experienced the loss of someone very close to us and often when we hear of the death our friends or associates say, “I know how you feel”. After the funeral and the celebration of life, it becomes awfully quiet and lonely without the loved one who has passed away. That’s when Common Ground is needed and they provide the help needed to cope.

You can help Common Ground continue to provide these necessary programs. On Thursday, 6/16/22, Common Ground will hold its
2nd Annual Clam Cook with music provided by the very talented Eddie Testa Band taking place at Martell’s Tiki Bar from 5:30-9:30pm. It will be amazing food, raffle prizes and a cash bar. The food is awesome.

Help Common Ground Grief Center help those in need when they need it. You can buy clam cooking tickets or donate here:
commongroundgriefcenter.org and click on News and Events
As always thank you for your support.

The above post reflects the thoughts and observations of New Jersey 101.5 weekend host Big Joe Henry. All opinions expressed are those of Big Joe.

WATCH: States with the most new small businesses per capita

Visit Big Sky shifts focus from marketing to management

May 13, 2022

Montana Economy

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By Gabrielle Gasser ASSOCIATE EDITOR

BIG SKY – On the eve of another busy tourist season in Big Sky, the marketing and community management organization is shifting from relentless efforts to sell the destination to educating visitors on how to enjoy their Stay responsibly.

Today at the annual Visit Big Sky Marketing Outlook luncheon, presenters discussed the growth of Big Sky’s and the state’s tourism economy, and how that growth can be responsibly managed. About 60 business owners from a variety of industries came together to hear five speakers on topics ranging from how to use social media to drive business, what the state of Montana is doing to attract tourism, and how Big Sky can improve the visitor experience.

Brad Niva, CEO of the Big Sky Chamber of Commerce and VBS, shared in his presentation that in order for VBS to move away from marketing efforts, he plans to invest in projects to manage Big Sky as a destination and to improve the visitor experience.

Niva shares a quote from John Muir to kick off her presentation. PHOTO GABRIELLE GASSER

“As Big Sky has grown, we’re having a capacity issue,” Niva said. “All our hotels are full, our restaurants are full [and] lift lines are longer. …our change… does not mean that we stop marketing, but we must continue to communicate with our visitors and thus educate them on how to be a good visitor.

Some of this communication will take the form of new wayfinding signage which Niva says is being updated, as well as the new “Love Big Sky Like a Local” education campaign which gives tourists advice on how to be respectful. He also announced that VBS was part of an effort to update Google Street View in Big Sky, which currently uses photos taken in 2015. Over three days in the first week of June, the 32-mile route of Big Sky will be recaptured to help visitors find their way around today’s Big Sky.

To support local businesses, Niva said it is working on a new website and tourism industry newsletter that will be distributed monthly to businesses and provide them with up-to-date Big Sky data to help inform staffing decisions.

In an effort to create visitor services and to more firmly play the role of destination manager rather than marketer, VBS in its FY23 application made a request for $333,600 to the Big District Council Sky Resort Area to get funds to build new public restrooms in Fire. Pit Park in the city center.

“We don’t use any resort fees for traditional marketing,” Niva said. “It will only serve the infrastructure and betterment of our community. »

After Niva’s presentation, Haley Walter, campaign director for Visit Montana, said the state is seeing record numbers in bed tax collections as well as growth across all regions.

The state’s goal based on that growth, Walter said, is public education and spreading the “responsibly recreate” messages.

Additionally, Walter said Visit Montana is working to promote the spread of tourists throughout the state to relieve pressure on high-traffic areas. The state will also transition to an “always on” marketing model, intended to support visits during the shoulder seasons.

Big Sky is the largest collector of the 4% lodging facility use tax in the state, according to data from the Montana Office of Tourism, raising a total of $4,948,727 million in 2021 , Bozeman in second place by raising $4,455,700.

Big Sky has “enough visitors,” Niva said, and now is the time to step back from marketing and focus on communicating with those visitors.

Niva said the Big Sky community has already done a good job of marketing and managing it as a destination and he wants that to continue in the future.

“It’s our job,” he said, “to continue to inspire people to take the time to work on their business and work on our experience, make sure our visitors leave here saying: ” I can not wait to return “.”

28-year-old NJ man admits stabbing student roommate’s death

May 12, 2022

Montana Lending

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JERSEY CITY — A 28-year-old city resident has admitted to the stabbing death of his 23-year-old roommate nearly two years ago.

Tong Cheng pleaded guilty to manslaughter, Hudson County District Attorney Esther Suarez announced Wednesday.

On August 8, 2020, the Jersey City Police Department responded to a call about a suspicious condition at a New York Avenue apartment near Hutton Street.

Yuting Ge was found in the apartment the two men shared, unresponsive with multiple stab wounds.

Ge was a student at Stevens Institute of Technology.

Cheng is an alumnus of Stevens Institute of Technology Graduate School.

He was arrested at a hotel in Weehawken two days later.

When Cheng is sentenced in late July, the state will recommend a 30-year prison sentence, subject to the No Early Release Act.

Erin Vogt is a reporter and anchor for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach her at [email protected]

Click here to contact an editor about a comment or correction for this story.

WATCH: States with the most new small businesses per capita

Inside Whitney Houston’s $1.6 Million Home and Studio

Take a look at the late Whitney Houston’s longtime New Jersey home and studio, now for sale.

Incredibly expensive divorces

Voting for the New Jersey Hall of Fame Class of 2022

These are the nominees for the New Jersey Hall of Fame Class of 2022. They come from all walks of life, spanning generations dating back to colonial times. The nominees span the categories of arts and humanities, business, performing arts and entertainment, public service and sports.

NJ County Fairs are making a comeback: Check out the schedule for 2022

UPDATE 4/10: A current list of county fairs happening in the Garden State for 2022. From rides, food, animals and hot air balloons, each county fair has something unique to offer.

(Fairs are listed in geographic order from South NJ to North NJ)

Missoula Justice of the Peace Alex Beal on running for re-election

May 12, 2022

Montana Mortgages

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Outgoing Department One Justice of the Peace Alex Beal appeared on KGVO Talk Back on Thursday to answer questions from listeners about his re-election bid for a second four-year term.

Beal discussed the tumultuous state of the justice system when he was elected four years ago and his efforts to “right the ship” with fellow justice of the peace Landee Holloway.

“The first month we were there, we got to all the staff together,” Judge Beal began. “We have a new Independent Trustee who is in charge of personnel and this is something we have been working on with the County Commissioners Office. Judges should be in charge of the courtroom and responsible for making decisions about things. No one elects us to be a group of managers.

Beal acknowledged that Justice Court is often the first experience a member of the public has with the criminal justice system.

“I try to treat the court professionally,” he said. “We handle it cleanly, but in a friendly way and it can be a scary process. I want you in and it doesn’t have to be scarier than that. We will walk you through the process. I’ll let you know what your options are, and we’ll go from there. There are consequences for people’s actions. These consequences are addressed. We issue sentences, fines, jail time, whatever is appropriate in the circumstances, but I try to explain to people, “this is why we are doing this.”

He explained what the Court of Justice can and cannot do in the criminal justice system.

“I think it’s important to understand what the Court of Justice does and doesn’t do,” he said. “And so we’re not doing the whole thing on a crime. People who are on their 13th DUI the only time we’re going to see it is if they’ve been arrested and that first hearing and what kind of bail should there be and then the rest but as and as this case progresses, like jail, it’s all up to the district court. We don’t care about that. »

Beal said criminal cases tend to get attention, but that’s only a small fraction of what happens in court every day.

“We’ve talked a lot today about violent crime, criminal crime, things like that, but that’s about half a percent of what we do on a daily basis,” he said. “The remaining 49.5% are misdemeanors. 50% is civilian stuff. No one thinks of us in terms of civilians (cases) but half of our work is about people being prosecuted. People getting kicked out, all those little things and just being able to provide a fair and reasonable experience for people to come and settle their differences, and that makes me happy.

Beal is opposed in the primary by Bill Burt and Daniel Kaneff, both of whom have extensive military and police experience.

WATCH: What are the main laws passed in the year you were born?

The data in this list was acquired from reliable online sources and media. Read on to find out which major law was passed the year you were born and find out its name, vote count (if any), and its impact and significance.

25 real crime scenes: what do they look like today?

Below, find out where 25 of history’s most infamous crimes took place – and what these places are used for today. (If they remained standing.)

Popular Downtown Missoula Bars For Sale

See photos of iconic Missoula bars The Badlander, Locals Only, The Golden Rose and Three in the Side. The businesses went up for sale with an asking price of $3,200,000.

Resilient Butte program sees potential for green energy in mining town

May 11, 2022

Montana Economy

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BUTTE – The National Center for Appropriate Technology (NCAT) is partnering with Montana Tech and Butte-Silver Bow County to bring renewable energy ideas and solutions to the impacts of climate change.

“We’re going to work with experts across the country who know climate trends and climate projections to say what issues Butte is facing? So we can be tough on Butte going forward,” said NCAT Director Steve Thompson.

The Resilient Butte program creates a plan to stimulate local business development, develop green energy, and protect the community and its natural resources from the impacts of climate change. This includes health and environmental issues such as drought, forest fires and rising temperatures.

“A lot more wildfire smoke, most summers we get more wildfire smoke. It’s a health concern for particularly vulnerable people,” Thompson said.

The plan also involves investing in new clean energy sources such as solar, energy storage systems or green hydrogen industries.

“One of the opportunities we have in Butte is to put solar panels on the mining lands and that would be really cool, and it’s such an interesting and specific project for Butte,” said Resilient Butte coordinator Rylie Yaeger. .

Some city officials see it as preparing Butte for a new economy.

“How do we adapt as a community to future energy, power, water needs, whatever it is, we have to come up with a plan for that,” Butte general manager JP Gallagher said.

The group is soliciting community feedback with a poll on the Resilient Butte website.

The Downside of Solar Farms on the South Coast

May 10, 2022

Montana Loans

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To twist Joni Mitchell’s hit song “Big Yellow Taxi” I’ll say “They paved heaven and set up a solar farm” because people are paying close attention to whether some of the solar farms are creating problems that harm the environment.

In Wareham, townspeople are worried about the felling of all the trees to accommodate nearly 20 solar farms on 300 acres of land and at least nine more, totaling another 500 acres planned. Even those who value clean energy worry that cutting down forests and altering natural habitats to make room for solar panels is going too far, according to a piece in the boston globe magazine by Emma Foehringer Merchant.

At the Acushnet town hall this week, the same reservations surfaced when residents voted to impose a 180-day moratorium on the issuance of any new solar farm permits until officials could review the current regulations.

“There are 20 permits right now, but the neighbors have a lot of questions about any possibility of hazardous materials in 20 to 25 years, and to be honest, I don’t think we need all these solar farms,” said said Town. Meeting with Elector Norman Fredette.

“Solar electricity is no cheaper than natural gas or oil to power factories and manufacturing,” the licensed contractor said.

The Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources estimates that about 2,500 acres of trees have been felled to install solar panels over the past 10 years.

“I’m old school on this. If solar power was so important, there would be a lot more people jumping on the bandwagon,” Fredette said. “Furthermore, the felling of trees and forests negatively affects our environment and our local vegetation and wildlife, and have you seen the interference with rainfall and drainage they cause?”

It is not a question of being for or against the production of solar energy. It’s about doing the right thing. I don’t think it’s “old school” to take a break as a community, like Wareham and Acushnet, and look very closely at all the issues here.

I also don’t think it’s old school to find out if solar farms harm the environment, so it’s not worth it, in many cases, but not all.

WATCH: States with the most new small businesses per capita

North Shore Roast Beef Places Worth Visiting

Côte-Nord roast beef is a special sandwich in its own right. From thinly sliced ​​rare beef to a toasted bun, it might sound easily repeatable, but not very much a roast beef sandwich is a North Shore roast beef sandwich. The best way to order one is a “three course” with James River barbecue sauce, American cheese and mayonnaise. Here are some of the spots that our listeners think do it best.

First Interstate BancSystem (FIBK) – Weekly Investment Analyst Rating Changes

May 9, 2022

Montana Loans

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First interstate banking system (NASDAQ: FIBK) recently received a number of price target changes and ratings updates:

  • 03/05/2022 – First Interstate BancSystem has been updated by analysts at StockNews.com from a “sell” rating to a “hold” rating.
  • 05/03/2022 – First Interstate BancSystem has been upgraded by Janney Montgomery Scott analysts from a “neutral” rating to a “buy” rating. They now have a price target of $42.00 on the stock.
  • 02/05/2022 – First Interstate BancSystem has been upgraded by analysts at Keefe, Bruyette & Woods from a “market performance” rating to an “outperformance” rating. They now have a price target of $45.00 on the stock.
  • 04/25/2022 – First Interstate BancSystem Downgraded by Analysts at StockNews.com from a “hold” rating to a “sell” rating.
  • 08/04/2022 – First Interstate BancSystem has been updated by analysts at Zacks Investment Research from a “hold” rating to a “buy” rating. They now have a price target of $39.00 on the stock. According to Zacks, “First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. is a financial and banking holding company. Through its wholly owned subsidiary, First Interstate Bank, it offers a range of banking products and services to individuals, businesses, municipalities and other entities in all of its markets. The Company’s banking products and services include demand, term, checking and savings deposits. The Company’s loan portfolio consists of a mix of real estate, consumer, commercial, agricultural and other loans, including fixed and variable rate loans. Its real estate loans include commercial real estate, construction, residential, agricultural and other loans. It also provides a range of trust, employee benefits, investment management, insurance, agency and custodial services to individuals, businesses and non-profit organizations. First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. is headquartered in Billings, Montana. “
  • 07/04/2022 – First Interstate BancSystem has been updated by analysts at StockNews.com from a “sell” rating to a “hold” rating.
  • 03/30/2022 – First Interstate BancSystem downgraded by analysts at StockNews.com from a “hold” rating to a “sell” rating.
  • 03/22/2022 – First Interstate BancSystem has been updated by analysts at StockNews.com from a “sell” rating to a “hold” rating.

Shares of NASDAQ: FIBK opened at $34.73 on Monday. First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. has a 1-year low of $32.40 and a 1-year high of $47.87. The stock has a market capitalization of $2.16 billion, a price-earnings ratio of 18.09 and a beta of 1.04. The company has a quick ratio of 0.66, a current ratio of 0.67 and a debt ratio of 0.10. The company’s 50-day simple moving average is $36.52.

First interstate banking system (NASDAQ: FIBKGet a rating) last announced its results on Thursday, April 28. The financial services provider reported ($0.36) earnings per share (EPS) for the quarter, missing analyst consensus estimates of ($0.31) by ($0.05). First Interstate BancSystem posted a net margin of 29.28% and a return on equity of 8.40%. During the same period a year earlier, the company posted EPS of $0.83. As a group, analysts expect First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. to post earnings per share of 2.61 for the current year.

The company also recently announced a quarterly dividend, which will be paid on Friday, May 20. Investors of record on Monday, May 9 will receive a dividend of $0.41. This represents an annualized dividend of $1.64 and a yield of 4.72%. The ex-dividend date is Friday, May 6. First Interstate BancSystem’s dividend payout ratio is currently 85.42%.

Separately, insider Philip G. Gaglia sold 1,921 shares in a trade on Wednesday, February 23. The stock was sold at an average price of $38.94, for a total value of $74,803.74. The transaction was disclosed in a filing with the Securities & Exchange Commission, accessible via this link. Also, insider Philip G. Gaglia sold 1,863 shares in a trade on Thursday, March 10. The shares were sold at an average price of $38.70, for a total value of $72,098.10. Disclosure of this sale can be found here. In the past three months, insiders have sold 21,634 shares of the company valued at $841,767. 6.40% of the shares are held by company insiders.

Institutional investors and hedge funds have recently changed their stakes in the company. Envestnet Asset Management Inc. increased its stake in shares of First Interstate BancSystem by 11.1% in the 4th quarter. Envestnet Asset Management Inc. now owns 83,533 shares of the financial services provider worth $3,397,000 after acquiring an additional 8,374 shares in the last quarter. Massachusetts Financial Services Co. MA acquired a new stake in shares of First Interstate BancSystem in Q3 valued at $46,266,000. Trexquant Investment LP acquired a new stake in shares of First Interstate BancSystem in Q3 valued at $276,000. Heartland Advisors Inc. increased its stake in shares of First Interstate BancSystem by 83.7% in the 4th quarter. Heartland Advisors Inc. now owns 292,187 shares of the financial services provider worth $11,883,000 after acquiring an additional 133,089 shares in the last quarter. Finally, Credit Suisse AG increased its position in shares of First Interstate BancSystem by 12.1% during the third quarter. Credit Suisse AG now owns 37,879 shares of the financial services provider worth $1,526,000 after buying an additional 4,096 shares in the last quarter. 69.42% of the shares are held by institutional investors and hedge funds.

First Interstate BancSystem, Inc operates as a bank holding company for First Interstate Bank which provides a range of banking products and services in the United States. It offers various traditional deposit products, including checks, savings deposits and term deposits; and repurchase agreements primarily for commercial and municipal depositors.

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Many More NJ Cities Should Switch to the Legal Weed Market

May 8, 2022

Montana Lending

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When the deadline arrived in August 2021, about 70% of New Jersey municipalities had passed ordinances stating that no business related to the state’s legal recreational market could operate within their boundaries.

But the number of cities opting out has dwindled since last summer as municipalities learned more about New Jersey’s cannabis rules. And experts expect dozens, if not hundreds more cities to green light marijuana operations over the next two years.

“I think a lot of cities will start signing up because they’ll see it’s a compliant business, there really isn’t a lot of drama…and they’ll also see the opportunities economic,” said Rob Mejia, lead instructor for University of Stockton Minor in Cannabis Studies.

The market doesn’t just translate into tax revenue for the city, Mejia said — there are great opportunities for building a dispensary, for example, as well as jobs.

“Cannabis is currently the fastest growing industry in the country, and every time you move from a medical market to an adult market, your cannabis job market grows up to 10 times what he was,” he said.

On April 21, the day the New Jersey market opened, 12 dispensaries took in a total of about $1.9 million.

Cities that have opted out are free to participate at any time, by modifying an existing ordinance or adopting a new one. Municipalities that chose to allow cannabis operations in town, however, would have to wait 5 years before abandoning the industry. Cities are not allowed to refuse delivery.

“Several municipalities that have opted out of their options are currently evaluating these regulations and market development to determine their best next steps,” said Michael Cerra, executive director of the New Jersey State League of Municipalities.

Dover, Maplewood and South Orange are just a few cities that had passed temporary bans against the legal sale of cannabis, but have since decided to go into the market.

“A lot of towns pulled out just to find out what was going on,” said Morristown Fox Rothschild partner Fruqan Mouzon. “Because it’s brand new, a lot of people were hesitant.”

Mouzon noted that unsubscribes aren’t just an inconvenience to potential consumers; they also prevent potential business owners from obtaining a “microlicense”, specifically designed for small family operations majority-owned by a local resident.

Dino Flammia is a reporter for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach him at [email protected]

Click here to contact an editor about a comment or correction for this story.

WATCH: States with the most new small businesses per capita

NJ Beach Tag Guide for Summer 2022

We are coming another summer to the Jersey Shore! Before you lose yourself in the excitement of sunny days on the sand, we calculate how much seasonal/weekly/daily beach beacons will cost you, and pre-season deals you can still take advantage of!

A medical mystery has arrived in North Dakota

May 6, 2022

Montana Loans

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It’s a mystery in North Dakota that even the Associated Press has picked up on.

So here are some questions for you, how does an individual get hepatitis? What exactly is hepatitis? I just want to make sure to quote the health experts – according to line-sante.com “Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver. Alcohol use, several health conditions, and certain medications can all cause this disease. However, viral infections are the most common cause of hepatitis” Now I know that part , because I worked in a restaurant years ago, THE most common rule for employees was to ALWAYS wash their hands. So there are many ways to catch hepatitis.

So why is this case in Grand Forks, North Dakota involving a young child with hepatitis so mysterious?

They call it “hepatitis of unknown origin” – simply put, all the usual causes of hepatitis have been ruled out, so of course the mystery falls on how this child (recovering at home) got it. has contacted. usnews reported “The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has investigated cases of sudden liver disease in children that has led health authorities around the world to search for clues. The disease is called hepatitis of unknown origin”

My final question is, are there any symptoms someone might experience that relate to hepatitis?

I’m guessing there’s a stomach problem or nausea? Maybe some aches? “Symptoms may include cold symptoms, fever, sore throat, pneumonia, diarrhea, or pink eye,” usnews.com added. Let’s hope the mystery doesn’t spread to other cases.


WATCH: States with the most new small businesses per capita

Trade School or College – Which is Better for NJ?

May 6, 2022

Montana Lending

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If you’ve been to high school in New Jersey in the last 30 years, you’ve probably faced the same pressure as kids today regarding what to do.

High schools are geared towards producing middle schoolers, plain and simple. There’s a cultural stigma that seems to be placed on kids who don’t want to go to college.

Tim Gouw on Unsplash

Tim Gouw on Unsplash

We even have massive government programs to deal with the “crisis” of not being able to afford college. We now have politicians spending taxpayers’ money to pay illegal immigrants to attend college for free. And a White House focused on paying off a certain amount of student debt. This is wrong and wrong policy.

We need to change direction and recognize that young people need options and opportunities.

PTTI EDU through Unsplash

PTTI EDU through Unsplash

Why should every child go to college? Why should taxpayers subsidize elite academics who charge families hundreds of thousands of dollars for an education that may have no positive impact on their future careers? Billions of dollars to these institutions and billions of debt to working families.

We heard stories throughout the morning of kids graduating from high school, going to trade school, joining a union, and hitting six figures in their twenties.

Maybe it’s time to stop measuring high school success by the percentage of kids who go on to college. What about the percentage of kids who buy a house within five years of graduating? Or just a note from those employed after high school? Certainly, a more accurate representation of success in the real world.

It’s time for taxpayers to stop subsidizing “Big College” and start investing our resources to help our local economy grow and lift people to the next level of success. It starts with changing the way we evaluate our secondary schools.

Let’s completely change the conversation and give kids better choices.

The above post reflects the thoughts and observations of Bill Spadea, host of New Jersey talk show 101.5. All opinions expressed are those of Bill. Bill Spadea is on the air weekdays from 6-10 a.m., speaking from Jersey, taking your calls at 1-800-283-1015.

WATCH: States with the most new small businesses per capita

Voting for the New Jersey Hall of Fame Class of 2022

These are the nominees for the New Jersey Hall of Fame Class of 2022. They come from all walks of life, spanning generations dating back to colonial times. The nominees span Arts and Humanities, Business, Performing Arts and Entertainment, Public Service and Sports.

Broadband Champions Needed to Combat Barriers and Boost Public Funding, Panelists Say: Broadband Breakfast

May 6, 2022

Montana Economy

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HOUSTON, May 4, 2022 – Those considering using public funding opportunities should communicate with all levels of stakeholders and worthwhile partnerships to get the most out of the Infrastructure Investment Act funding and the ‘job.

Funding plans live or die by stakeholder involvement, said Tom CoverickCEO of Keybanc Capital Markets.

“Every project needs a champion,” he said during the Broadband Breakfast’s Digital Infrastructure Investment mini-conference at the Broadband Communities Summit on Monday. “We are looking at higher interest rates and [rising] labor costs. Without local champions, these local projects would have a hard time moving forward.

“The reality is that these champions in local regions will know everyone who needs to be involved, and if they don’t know, they’ll find out how it is pretty quickly,” Coverick said.

“Some communities are ahead of others,” said Illinois Broadband Office Manager matt schmit mentioned. “There are a lot of great role models across the country who have [created] community engagement and outreach programs.

Schmit used Illinois’ “Accelerate Illinois” partnership between the state and Heartland Forward. He explained how this program has helped guide communities who are committed to obtaining public funding for broadband, but who may not have concrete goals or a vision of how to achieve them.

“[These communities] haven’t had this inclusive conversation at the community level, or they may not know exactly how to prepare a grant application, or [how to] find the ideal private supplier partner.

Schmit also emphasized the importance of communication and emphasized a three-legged stool for access, adoption and use. “Be available [to community leaders – to that local champion –] is really important,” Schmit said. “It’s going to make or break a lot of our investment in the United States.”

CEO of the California Emerging Technology Fund Sunne Wright McPeak said communication should be encouraged from all stakeholders, from top to bottom. She spoke in particular of state leaders informing local community leaders of the opportunities available to them through grants.

Part of this coordination helped generate intermediary investments to connect eligible communities, she said.

“It is essential to systematically contact the public bodies that must approve the projects and give the permits, and those who will develop the project and apply for the financing[essential”saidMcPeak[iscritical”McPeaksaid[estessentiel”adéclaréMcPeak[iscritical”McPeaksaid

“People who are really on the ground in adoption are what we call trusted messengers,” she added. “It’s the community organizations that can do outreach – in language and culture – and increase that turnout.”

“Where there is a will, there is a way”, said the CEO of UTOPIA Fiber Roger Timmerman. “If you have elected officials or community groups or leaders and you want to solve the broadband problem in your area, you need to organize that effort and find good partners.”

Information on the presentations made during the “Public Funding” panel is available on the Digital Infrastructure Investment page.

What impact will the Fed’s rate hike have on consumers and inflation? Here’s what we know

May 5, 2022

Montana Mortgages

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Following through on its promise of aggressive action to contain record US inflation, the Federal Reserve raised its key rate by 0.5% on Wednesday, the biggest gradual jump in 22 years.

US inflation hit a 12-month rate of 8.5% in March, according to the latest report from the US Department of Labor.

While the 8.5% inflation rate is the overall US average, Utah and other Mountain West states including Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada , New Mexico and Wyoming, recorded an annual increase in inflation to 10.4% in March.

Fed Chairman Jerome Powell said the rate hike, which is expected to be followed by further upward adjustments of 0.5% in the coming months, has a “good chance” of slowing rate hikes. inflation-induced consumer prices that are currently at 40-year highs.

“We need to do everything we can to restore stable prices as quickly and efficiently as possible,” Powell said at a press conference on Wednesday, according to CNBC. “We think we have a good chance of doing that without a significant increase in unemployment or a really sharp downturn.”

But, Powell also acknowledged that the Fed’s monetary toolkit is imprecise at best and that the hoped-for outcome of controlling inflation is by no means guaranteed.

“We don’t have precision surgical tools. We basically have interest rates, balance sheet and forward guidance and those are… notoriously blunt tools,” Powell said at the press conference.

“Nobody thinks it will be easy. No one thinks it’s simple. But there is certainly a plausible path to that,” he added.

Here’s how rising rates could impact the average US consumer:

I am considering buying a house. Will mortgage rates continue to rise?

Home loan rates have skyrocketed over the past few months, mostly in anticipation of the Fed’s actions, and will likely continue to rise. On Wednesday, Freddie Mac announced that the average interest on a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage was 5.27%, the highest in more than a decade.

“Mortgage rates resumed their ascent this week as the 30-year fixed rate hit its highest level since 2009,” Sam Khater, chief economist at Freddie Mac, said in a press release. “While housing affordability and inflationary pressures pose challenges to potential buyers, house price growth will continue but is expected to slow in the coming months.”

Mortgage rates don’t necessarily go up at the same time as Fed rate hikes. Sometimes they even move in the opposite direction. Long-term mortgages tend to follow the yield of the 10-year treasury bill, which, in turn, is influenced by various factors. These include investor expectations for future inflation and global demand for US Treasuries.

For now, however, accelerating inflation and strong US economic growth are pushing the 10-year Treasury rate up sharply. As a result, mortgage rates have jumped more than 2 percentage points since the start of the year.

How will this affect the housing market?

If you’re looking to buy a home and you’re frustrated with the lack of available homes, which has sparked bidding wars and exorbitant prices, that’s unlikely to change any time soon.

Economists say higher mortgage rates will discourage some potential buyers. And average home prices, which have been climbing at an annual rate of about 20%, could at least rise at a slower rate.

Soaring mortgage rates “will temper the pace of home price appreciation as the price of potential buyers rises,” said Greg McBride, chief financial analyst for Bankrate.

Yet the number of available homes remains historically low, a trend that will likely frustrate buyers and keep prices high.

What about car loans?

Fed rate hikes can make car loans more expensive. But other factors also affect these rates, including competition between car manufacturers which can sometimes reduce borrowing costs.

Rates for buyers with lower credit scores are the most likely to rise following Fed hikes, said Alex Yurchenko, chief data officer for Black Book, which monitors vehicle prices in the United States. Since the prices of used vehicles increase on average, the monthly payments will also increase.

Right now, new vehicle loans are averaging around 4.5%. Used vehicle rates are around 5%.

What about other prices?

For users of credit cards, home equity lines of credit and other variable-interest debt, rates would rise by roughly the same amount as the Fed hike, typically within one or two billing cycles. That’s because those rates are based in part on the banks’ prime rate, which moves in tandem with the Fed.

Those who don’t qualify for low-rate credit cards may end up paying higher interest on their balance. The rates on their cards would increase as the prime rate does.

If the Fed decides to raise rates by 2 percentage points or more over the next two years – a distinct possibility – it would significantly increase interest payments.

Will I be able to earn more on my savings?

Probably, although unlikely. And it depends on where your savings, if you have any, are parked.

Savings, certificates of deposit and money market accounts generally do not follow Fed changes. Instead, banks tend to take advantage of a higher rate environment to try and boost their profits. They do this by charging higher rates to borrowers, without necessarily offering higher rates to savers.

Contributor: Associated press

Many NJ stores still distribute paper bags, but that’s okay!

May 5, 2022

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Now that New Jersey’s toughest bag ban has been launched at supermarkets and big box stores are not allowed to give shoppers any type of plastic or paper bag, but that’s not the case for many other retail establishments.

The new law says all types of regular plastic bags are banned, but Eileen Kean, director of the New Jersey chapter of the National Federation of Independent Businesses, said some small stores weren’t sure what was allowed.

A paper bag is fine

The law allows paper bags in any retail establishment under 2,500 square feet. This excludes supermarkets and big box stores, but not small retailers.

“Many small boutiques have their own stylish paper bags with handles that become popular when you become a customer and you like the little bag because you use it once you get home,” Kean said.

Kean said it could get a bit confusing.

“There is a learning curve involved and business owners, NFIB members are trying to embrace the new world they live in,” she said.

Catalin205/Billion Photos/Townsquare Media photo illustration

Catalin205/Billion Photos/Townsquare Media photo illustration

Cities can’t make their own bag laws

She stressed that it’s important to understand that municipalities must follow state bag law and cannot impose their own regulations.

“It’s really good news for Main Street because what had happened was municipalities were coming up with their own restrictions and it was definitely confusing,” she said.

Kean noted that while plastic bags are banned, there is an exemption for dry cleaners.

“Dry cleaners can still use plastic bags that they use to protect clean clothes when delivered to a customer.”

Violators are fined $1,000.

“I think the business community is okay with it, not necessarily happy with the extremes of this ban, but they have no choice but to comply with the new law,” Kean said.

David Matthau is a reporter for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach him at [email protected]

Click here to contact an editor about a comment or correction for this story.

WATCH: States with the most new small businesses per capita

Inside Betty White’s Gorgeous Carmel-by-the-Sea Home

Take a peek inside the late Betty White’s beautiful, peaceful home in Carmel-by-the-Sea.

Netflix’s Most Popular TV Shows

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One Person’s Junk Fee is Another’s Treasure | Alston and bird

May 4, 2022

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The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has asked for feedback on how best to crack down on what it calls “unwanted charges.” Our Financial Services and Products group examines how mortgage services are distinguished and why mortgage servicers should be aware that their fees will be closely monitored.

  • Republican attorneys general urge greater federal-state cooperation
  • Democratic attorneys general want to add convenience fees to list
  • Takeaway: Now is the time for service agents to review their fee structures

On January 26, 2022, Rohit Chopra, the Director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), issued a Request for Information (RFI) seeking public comment on the fees which “are not subject to competitive processes ensuring fair pricing”. The director said when consumers don’t select their provider, as in loan servicing, “it can lead to stagnation, unwanted fees and poor treatment.” Chopra also said the CFPB would launch other initiatives to identify ways to lower barriers to entry and increase the pool of companies competing for customers based on quality, price and service. .

By the close of the comment period on April 11, the CFPB had received thousands of responses. While the broad RFI extends to providers of consumer financial products and services, the mortgage service is isolated and should alert mortgage servicers that their fees will be closely monitored. In fact, Chopra indicated in a blog post that the CFPB will use this information to review existing rules and to develop new ones “to stimulate competition and transparency” and to identify “illegal practices through… . supervision and enforcement”.

The CFPB has sought comment on what the CFPB pejoratively calls “junk fees” and “operating, back-end and excessive fees”. Examples of such mortgage service charges cited by the CFPB include late fees, insufficient funds (NSF) fees, payment processing convenience fees, and delinquency-related fees such as monthly fees. property inspection, new title fees, legal fees, appraisal and appraisal fees. , broker price opinion fees, forced insurance, foreclosure fees and corporate advances. Comments received by the CFPB include those from attorneys general (AGs) in both Republican and Democratic-leaning jurisdictions.

Republican AGs: How about federal-state cooperation?

To date, GAs in Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Montana, ‘Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Utah, Texas and West Virginia have all called for the CFPB to drop its plan to regulate fees and instead , to coordinate and cooperate with states to determine where federal action is “duplicated or unwarranted.” Republican AGs argue that the CFPB is trying to establish itself as the primary regulator in the consumer financial products pay-for-services space and, therefore, infringing on states’ right to regulate business practices within their borders. . These AGs argue that the CFPB’s RFI on “Undesirable Charges – Exploitative, Indirect, Hidden or Excessive” suggests that the CFPB is “predisposed to create a subjective standard for identifying problematic charges”.

And these AG Republicans argue that the CFPB fails to recognize that state laws already regulate many such fees in consumer financial products and that federal regulation would be duplicative. According to AG Republicans, states are better able to assess the needs of their citizens as well as the impact of royalties on state markets. They point to the fact that states specifically allow many types of fees, such as late fees, NSF fees, filing fees, administrative fees, amendment and deferral fees, and title fees. They also note that states are prepared to enforce their laws if a consumer financial services provider fails to comply with or take action under the state’s Unfair or Deceptive Acts or Practices (UDAP) provisions when a consumer is misled. AG Republicans also expressed concern that the CFPB would seek to use its UDAAP authority to regulate fees and questioned the use of that authority for fees that are “disclosed pursuant to state law. or federal, in some cases permitted by state law, and agreed to by a consumer in writing.

This is a dominance concern – Republican AGs are concerned that the CFPB sees itself as the primary regulator and intends to limit states’ power to regulate fees. Of course, the CFPB’s retort may simply be that it fixes the ground and states are free to go further. The real question is where the CFPB draws the line – and if that line goes further than some states have, will that raise preemption concerns.

Democrat AGs: Go get them, Director Chopra!

The AG Democrats praise the CFPB’s RFI and call for comment and limit their comments to one issue: convenience fees charged by mortgage services. California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania GAs , Rhode Island and Washington, along with the Hawaii Consumer Protection Bureau, consider convenience fees (along with overdrafts and NSFs) to be “harmful unwanted fees” and urge the CFPB to prohibit managers from mortgages to impose a convenience fee or, alternatively, to restrict mortgage lending services from charging a convenience fee that exceeds the documented actual cost of the service.

It’s ironic: not too long ago, many of these same blue states allowed convenience fees with restrictions in a multi-state settlement agreement with a large loan servicer.

Now the AG Democrats argue that because lenders are supposed to earn their profit for mortgage servicing through the interest rate and other fees originally, managers have already been compensated for the costs of accepting mortgages. payments (a core function of managers) and therefore are compensated twice for accepting payments. The CFPB should recognize that this argument reflects a fundamental misapplication of basic service business practices.

In fact, the CFPB recognized fee structures for servicing activities in its 2013 Mortgage Servicing Rules. loan owners usually negotiate prices with the manager, usually a monthly management fee. Repairers also receive ancillary fees, late fees and, as the CFPB acknowledged in 2013, “telephone payment processing fees”. It should be noted that the CFPB did not prohibit convenience fees in its 2013 Mortgage Servicing Rules. The CFPB also declined to address convenience fees in its recently enacted Bylaw F, although this issue has been raised during the CFPB’s Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act review process.

Mortgage managers will argue that borrowers enter into a contract, in the form of a promissory note, and agree to repay the borrowed money in monthly installments. The borrower also agrees to pay late fees if their payments are not received by the end of the grace period, usually 15 days after the contractual due date. Typical mortgage agreements don’t require managers to offer expedited payment options, such as online and phone payments, for borrowers waiting until the last day to make their payment.

Nevertheless, many mortgage servicers choose to make these payment options available to borrowers, even if these accelerated options come at a cost to the servicer. For example, expedited options often require the use of third-party payment processing providers such as Western Union, and among other costs, the mortgage servicer typically must hire and train customer service agents to receive payments over the phone and hire computer programmers to build and maintain the systems necessary to accept payments online or through interactive voice response telephone technology. It should also be noted that managers do not assess convenience fees without the knowledge and consent of borrowers. Rather, the fact and amount of the convenience fee is disclosed to borrowers at that time, before borrowers choose to continue with that payment method.

The GA Democrats argue that “like refinancing, this so-called choice is actually delusional for many borrowers,” noting that “convenience fees actually work like alternative late fees — maybe cheaper, but with a delay.” shorter grace period, and in breach of contract the terms of most mortgages which outline the exact amount and timing of late fees, so rationally the consumer chooses the cheapest option and accepts the convenience fee But the simple fact of choosing the least bad option does not mean that the consumer really has a choice Does the borrower have no choice to make his payment on time, or at least contractually agreed grace period?Borrowers who choose a modest, fully disclosed convenience fee leave themselves much better off financially than incurring considerably more expensive late fees (not to mention avoiding ra negative credit reports, which can negatively impact the consumer even more broadly).

Penalizing mortgage servicers by eliminating their ability to charge clearly disclosed and agreed fees for services – those they are not required to provide – will, at a minimum, reduce their incentive to offer such options, limit the choice of consumers and discourage future service innovation. for the benefit of borrowers.

Take away food

In 2013, the CFPB recognized that repairers are not really subject to market discipline from consumers, as consumers have little opportunity to change repairers. The CFPB acknowledged, however, that “service agents compete for contracts with loan owners (investors, assignees and creditors) and that, therefore, competitive pressures tend to cause service agents to lower the price of services and to adjust their investments in the provision of services to consumers accordingly”. .” Chopra seems to challenge this premise. While service portability is something to consider in the future, now is the time for services to take a close look at the fees charged to consumers to ensure these fees are legally permitted and properly disclosed.

Download the PDF of the notice

[View source.]

Visit Montana celebrates the future of travel

May 3, 2022

Montana Economy

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National Travel and Tourism Week highlights the Collective strength of the travel industry in the United States

HELEN, Mont., May 3, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Montana joins tourism partners across the state to celebrate the travel and tourism industry – the state’s second largest industry – during National Travel and Tourism Week (NTTT) May 1-7, 2022.

“Tourism plays a vital role in from montana economy,” said Scott Osterman, director of the Montana Department of Commerce. “This week celebrates the work of the hospitality industry across the state and the thousands of local Montanese employed in various travel industries.”

Celebrated the first full week of May each year, this year’s theme is The future of travel and focuses on workforce, sustainability, connection building and more as the industry looks to future growth and success after the challenges of the past two years.

A key driver of the state’s economy, tourism has a huge impact on Montanawith data from the Institute for Tourism and Recreation Research (ITRR) showing an impact that includes:

  • Montana welcomed about 12.5 million non-resident visitors in 2021
  • Non-resident visitors spent approximately $5.22 billion in 2021
  • that spending by non-resident visitors supported $4.42 billion of economic activity in 2021
  • Travel, tourism and hospitality supported 68,630 jobs and contributed $2.038 billion in employee compensation

Montana is a place that remains at the top of the wish list of many travellers,” said Jan Stoddard, bureau chief of the Montana Tourist Board. “Year after year, we see the positive impacts of non-resident traveler spending as it touches every community across the state.”

Destination Analysts reports that nearly 90% of Americans have a trip planned for 2022, with family travel, solo travel and meeting travel being a high priority.

“NTTW takes on special significance this year as the travel industry looks to a bright future,” said Roger Dow, president and CEO of the US Travel Association. “This NTTW is an opportunity to recognize the collective strength of the travel industry in the United States and how we are rebuilding ourselves to be more vibrant, innovative, sustainable and inclusive in the months and years to come.”

For more information on from montana tourism industry and marketing efforts, visit MarketMT.com.

About Visit Montana
To visit Montana markets from montana spectacular untouched nature, vibrant and charming small towns, breathtaking experiences, relaxing hospitality, and a competitive business climate to promote the state as a place to visit and do business. For more information, visit VISITMT.COM.

SOURCE Visit Montana

Hoeven and Daines bill tackles chronic wasting disease

May 2, 2022

Montana Loans

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On April 28, U.S. Senators John Hoeven (R-ND) and Steve Daines (R-MT) unveiled bipartisan legislation to provide $70 million a year to equally support research and management of the debilitating disease. (CWD), which the federal government says is a fatal neurological disease occurring in North American members of the deer family, including white-tailed deer, mule deer, elk, and moose.

Since its discovery in 1967, CWD has spread geographically and its prevalence has increased locally, according to the US Geological Survey.

“CWD is a growing threat to wildlife and livestock, impacting sportsmen, ranchers and the local ecology of regions across the United States,” Senator Hoeven said. “Our legislation would enable state and tribal governments to better manage and prevent outbreaks of this deadly disease, while advancing new methods to detect CWD and limit its spread.”

Senator Hoeven proposed the Chronic Wasting Disease Research and Management Act of 2022, S. 4111, with eight original cosponsors, including Senator Daines and U.S. Senator Martin Heinrich (D-NM) to authorize the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to administer funds allocated through cooperative agreements with state and tribal wildlife agencies and departments of agriculture, according to a summary of the bill provided by the senator’s staff. Hoven.

“By threatening Montana’s wildlife and ecosystems, chronic wasting disease also threatens the legacy of our sportsmen and our outdoor way of life,” said Sen. Daines. “My bipartisan bill will support Montana’s ongoing efforts to research, manage and contain the spread of chronic wasting disease among wildlife populations.”

If enacted, S. 4111 also includes authorization for the USDA and state and tribal agencies to develop educational materials to inform the public about chronic wasting disease and would direct the USDA to review its certification program. herds within 18 months, among several other provisions, according to the summary. .

The measure is supported by the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, Backcountry Hunters and Anglers, Congressional Sportsmen’s Foundation, Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership, National Wildlife Federation, Boone & Crockett, National Deer Association, North American Deer Farmers Association , the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and the Mule Deer Foundation.

Wonderland Pier worker in Ocean City, NJ, dies after fall

May 2, 2022

Montana Lending

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UPDATE: KYW-TV identified the worker who was killed while Robert W. Sanger, 62, of Pittsgrove, Salem County. Our original report continues below.

An employee of a subcontractor at Gillian’s Wonderland Pier in Ocean City died Monday after falling while working there.

A brief statement from Gillian’s as posted on social media reads,

We are saddened to report that a contractor employee working on an elevator at Gillian’s Wonderland Pier suffered a fatal injury on Monday morning.

According to a first report of the Atlantic City pressthe accident happened around 10:30 a.m. while work was underway on the park’s Ferris wheel.

Attraction operators say they are cooperating with authorities as an investigation into the accident is ongoing.

This is a developing story that will be updated when more information becomes available.

WATCH: States with the most new small businesses per capita

How the World Seen New Jersey—1940s to 1980s

This is how New Jersey saw the world from 1940 to 1980. All of these photos are from AP and Getty publications, which means they were used in a magazine or newspaper. There have been many inventions and stories made in New Jersey. Check the photos below.

All the NJ Pizza Restaurants Barstool’s Dave Portnoy Reviewed

Dave Portnoy, commonly known as El Presidente, is the founder of Barstool Sports. Somewhere along the way, he decided to start reviewing local pizzerias, and the concept took off. Here are all the New Jersey pizzerias Dave has stopped at, and how he rated them.

You decide: How well has North Carolina handled COVID-19? – The Coastland Times

May 2, 2022

Montana Economy

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By Mike Walden

Even if COVID-19 continues with its variants, medical experts hope the virus becomes less deadly and disruptive. In other words, we learn to live with it.

As a result, it should come as no surprise that an increasing number of studies are being published on how we coped with COVID-19 and what we can learn if we face another pandemic. One way to do this is to compare how states perform during COVID-19 on a number of important metrics.

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A recent study was written by three economists and published by the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). The NBER is not a national agency. It is a non-partisan, non-profit research organization founded in 1920. It is one of the most prestigious economic “think tanks” in the country. So when the NBER publishes a study, I pay attention.

While there have been numerous federal government policies, programs, and funding to combat the pandemic, our federal system has enabled all 50 states and Washington, D.C.. customize some of their own policies, including masking, closures, school operations, and vaccine availability. Therefore, there were 51 different localities (50 states plus Washington, DC) that the authors had to compare for their results in the fight against COVID-19.

The authors focused on three categories of outcomes: economy, education, and deaths. For the economy, the authors used two measures: the total number of months of unemployment per worker in the state from April 2020 at the start of the pandemic through the end of 2021, and the depth of the recession caused by the pandemic.

The impact of the pandemic on education was measured by the percentage of public education in each state that took place in person at schools rather than remotely. This measure was used because many experts and parents argued that remote learning for children during COVID-19 was not as beneficial to students’ academic outcomes as in-person learning.

For deaths, the per capita death rate over the past two COVID-19 years was used, but only after adjusting the figures for age and health factors, such as the prevalence of diabetes and obesity in the state.

So what did the study find, specifically for North Carolina? On both economic measures, North Carolina ranked 17and on measuring unemployment and 19and for the depth of the COVID-19 recession, where higher ranking means better performance. Translated, the results mean that among the 51 states plus Washington, D.C..North Carolina had the 17and the lowest total number of months of unemployment per worker and the 19and mildest COVID-19 recession. Montana had the best unemployment performance and South Dakota had the least severe recession. At the other end of the spectrum, New Jersey had the worst unemployment performance and Connecticut had the deepest recession.

North Carolina’s ranking on in-person student teaching was not as impressive. State ranked 34and, meaning 33 other states had a higher percentage of students receiving in-person instruction during the pandemic. Wyoming had the highest percentage of in-person instruction, while Washington, DC had the lowest percentage.

North Carolina’s highest ranking was in age- and health-adjusted COVID-19 deaths per capita, where the state ranked 7and, meaning only six states had lower adjusted COVID-19 deaths per capita. The best performing state for deaths was Hawaii, while the worst performing state was Arizona.

The authors also combined the individual rankings for each measure into a single overall ranking. North Carolina’s overall ranking was 13andmeaning the state had the 13and best performance during the pandemic among the fifty states and Washington, DC using all measures developed by the authors. Utah placed first in the combined standings and New Jersey came in last.

With 51 locations, North Carolina’s 13th place ranking puts the state in the top 25%. Among North Carolina’s immediate neighbors, only South Carolina ranked 12th. Georgia placed 19th.andTennessee was at 24and position and Virginie placed 36and.

As the economy progresses, ranking state performance during the pandemic can become very important. Rankings could become a major factor in business and household location decisions. It will take years, if not decades, for the memories of the COVID-19 pandemic to fade. Households and businesses will be motivated to move to states that have weathered the pandemic well compared to other states. The study published by the NBER strongly suggests that North Carolina is in the “coping well” category.

Economists agree that the future economy will go through major changes in what businesses do, how people work, and how and where people live. Being in a state that has handled the pandemic better than most other states should give that state an edge in dealing with these changes. Is North Carolina such a state? You decide.

Dr. Mike Walden is William Neal Reynolds Professor Emeritus at North Carolina State University.

READ NEWS AND EVENTS HERE.

Colstrip case shows results of botched law | Editorial

May 1, 2022

Montana Loans

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A group of high school students visited the Russell Smith federal courthouse last week and likely came away better educated than many state lawmakers.

Although they were unable to participate in the Portland General Electric Co. et.al. against NorthWestern Corp. et al. cases, their presence indicates that they were studying the basics of American civics. Judging by Federal Magistrate Kathleen DeSoto’s questions from the bench last Tuesday, some separation of powers lessons need corrective coverage at the state Capitol.

The case involved two bills by Sen. Steve Fitzpatrick, R-Great Falls, that passed last year. SB 265 would rewrite a 40-year-old contract so NorthWestern could have home court advantage in arbitration disputes with its co-owners of two aging coal-fired power plants at Colstrip. These co-owners wondered what right the Legislature had to rewrite an agreement that NorthWestern signed with eyes wide open when coal was king in Montana.

Now that the voters and taxpayers of these Washington and Oregon co-owners have legally decided to end investments in future coal burning, they have exercised their right to terminate the agreement through arbitration, as specified in the contract.

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This would effectively close the plant, unless NorthWestern and current operator Talen Energy find other investors. This is not likely, as Talen is already seeking loans to fund its bankruptcy proceedings. Nationally, about half of the coal-fired electric fleet has retired. In 2022 alone, operators will shut down about 15 gigawatts of coal-fired power due to age and growing incompetitiveness with the production of natural gas or renewable energy.

SB 265 moved the arbitration site from Spokane to Helena, changed Washington law to Montana law, and changed a sole arbitrator with demonstrated expertise to a three-person panel with no specified background.

The lead attorney for the Northwest Side argued that legislatures make such decisions about where and what the rules are all the time. DeSoto pointed out that the new rule was very different from what everyone had initially agreed. If that was OK, she asked, could the Legislative Assembly simply pass a law prohibiting the closure of Colstrip? Why not force a private company to ignore its own contract, its own local laws and its own self-interest with the stroke of a governor’s pen?

We would all like to avoid business gone bad. In this time of catastrophic climate change, there are many agreements committing us to burning fossil fuels that we need to find ways to break. But when we taxpayers, ratepayers and voters, in fact have an agreement that allows for such an improvement – ​​signed by all owners in good faith – then the rule of law should not be subject to a rule change.

Which made the SB 266 debate even more incredible. This bill gave the Attorney General of Montana the power to impose daily fines of $100,000 on any co-owner of Colstrip who refused to pay its operating expenses without the consent of all owners. This was not in the original deal, which only required a majority decision from the owners (those currently suing NorthWestern).

DeSoto called the SB 266 “incredibly broad status”. Its wording appeared to make even the defense against payment “an unfair or deceptive practice in the conduct of business” subject to fines of $100,000. Several attorneys in the audience dropped their jaws when North West’s lead attorney replied that it was the court’s prerogative to clarify the law. For example, a judge might declare that “conduct” does not include “recommendation”. DeSoto called it “rewriting the statute”.

In other circles, it is also called “judicial activism” or “lawmaking from the bench”. Some in these circles have demanded big changes in the way judges are selected and the courts conduct their internal affairs to better reflect the will of the legislative or administrative branches of government. In the course of civic education, it is the chapter on the separation of powers.

Too bad the high school students couldn’t watch all of this in real time last week. They wouldn’t have found a seat – all the pews were full. But the only elected official in the room was the mayor of Colstrip, who was there as a ‘friend of the court’ arguing for letting NorthWestern break a deal it was not a party to, to force private companies to bail a near-bankrupt industry for its local benefit. DeSoto said that sounded like “the definition of economic protectionism.”

Those who insist on the rule of law and judicial independence should consult the transcript for some guidance on the consequences of botched legislation.

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Financial comparison: First Interstate BancSystem (NASDAQ: FIBK) and First Business Financial Services (NASDAQ: FBIZ)

May 1, 2022

Montana Lending

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First business financial services (NASDAQ: FBIZGet a rating) and First Interstate BancSystem (NASDAQ: FIBKGet a rating) are both finance companies, but which stock is superior? We’ll compare the two companies based on valuation strength, profitability, risk, earnings, institutional ownership, analyst recommendations and dividends.

Analyst Recommendations

This is a summary of recent ratings and target prices for First Business Financial Services and First Interstate BancSystem, as provided by MarketBeat.com.

Sales Ratings Hold odds Buy reviews Strong buy odds Rating
First business financial services 0 1 1 0 2.50
First interstate banking system 0 2 1 0 2.33

First Business Financial Services currently has a consensus price target of $34.00, indicating a potential downside of 1.93%. First Interstate BancSystem has a consensus price target of $45.00, indicating a potential upside of 38.38%. Given the higher possible upside of First Interstate BancSystem, analysts clearly believe that First Interstate BancSystem is more favorable than First Business Financial Services.

Insider and Institutional Ownership

58.3% of First Business Financial Services shares are held by institutional investors. By comparison, 66.8% of First Interstate BancSystem’s shares are held by institutional investors. 6.1% of the shares of First Business Financial Services are held by insiders of the company. By comparison, 22.0% of the shares of First Interstate BancSystem are held by insiders of the company. Strong institutional ownership indicates that hedge funds, endowments, and large fund managers believe a stock is poised for long-term growth.

Volatility and risk

First Business Financial Services has a beta of 0.81, meaning its stock price is 19% less volatile than the S&P 500. In comparison, First Interstate BancSystem has a beta of 1.03, meaning its stock price is 3% more volatile than the S&P 500. .

Benefits and evaluation

This chart compares the revenue, earnings per share, and valuation of First Business Financial Services and First Interstate BancSystem.

Gross revenue Price/sales ratio Net revenue Earnings per share Price/earnings ratio
First business financial services $124.10 million 2.36 $35.76 million $4.05 8.56
First interstate banking system $656.00 million 3.08 $192.10 million $1.92 16.94

First Interstate BancSystem has higher revenue and profit than First Business Financial Services. First Business Financial Services trades at a lower price-to-earnings ratio than First Interstate BancSystem, indicating that it is currently the more affordable of the two stocks.

Profitability

This table compares the net margins, return on equity and return on assets of First Business Financial Services and First Interstate BancSystem.

Net margins Return on equity return on assets
First business financial services 28.81% 16.00% 1.33%
First interstate banking system 29.28% 10.07% 1.04%

Dividends

First Business Financial Services pays an annual dividend of $0.79 per share and has a dividend yield of 2.3%. First Interstate BancSystem pays an annual dividend of $1.64 per share and has a dividend yield of 5.0%. First Business Financial Services pays 19.5% of its profits as a dividend. First Interstate BancSystem pays 85.4% of its earnings as dividends, suggesting it may not have enough earnings to cover its dividend payment in the future. First Business Financial Services has increased its dividend for 10 consecutive years and First Interstate BancSystem has increased its dividend for 9 consecutive years.

Summary

First Interstate BancSystem beats First Business Financial Services on 10 out of 16 factors compared between the two stocks.

About First Business Financial Services (Get a rating)

First Business Financial Services, Inc. operates as a banking holding company for First Business Bank which provides commercial banking products and services to small and medium-sized businesses, business owners, executives, professionals and high net worth individuals. The Company offers deposit products, such as non-interest bearing transaction accounts, interest bearing transaction accounts, money market accounts, term deposits and certificates of deposit, as well as credit cards. It also offers lending products, including commercial real estate loans, commercial and industrial loans, small business administration loans and direct finance leases, as well as consumer and other loans comprising the value net of property, first and second mortgages and other personal loans for business and executive clients. The company offers commercial lending, asset-based lending, equipment financing, accounts receivable financing, vendor financing, floor plan financing, cash management services and employee retirement plans. business ; trust and estate administration, financial planning, investment management and private banking; and investment portfolio administration, asset-liability management, and asset-liability management process validation services for other financial institutions. First Business Financial Services, Inc. was founded in 1909 and is headquartered in Madison, Wisconsin.

About First Interstate BancSystem (Get a rating)

First Interstate BancSystem logoFirst Interstate BancSystem, Inc. operates as a bank holding company for First Interstate Bank which provides a range of banking products and services in the United States. It offers various traditional deposit products, including checks, savings deposits and term deposits; and repurchase agreements primarily for commercial and municipal depositors. The Company also offers real estate loans including commercial real estate, construction, residential, agricultural and other real estate loans; consumer loans including direct personal loans, credit card loans and lines of credit and indirect loans; variable and fixed rate commercial loans for small and medium sized manufacturing, wholesale, retail and service businesses for working capital needs and business expansion; and agricultural loans. Additionally, it provides a range of trust, employee benefits, investment management, insurance, agency and custodial services to individuals, businesses and non-profit organizations. In addition, the Company provides marketing, credit review, loan servicing, credit card issuance and servicing, mortgage sales and servicing, indirect purchase and processing of consumer loans, loan collection and other operational services, as well as online and mobile banking. It serves individuals, businesses, municipalities, and other entities in a variety of industries, including agriculture, construction, education, energy, government services, healthcare, hospitality, housing, l mining, professional services, real estate development, retail, technology, tourism and wholesale. Trade. As of December 31, 2021, it operated 147 banking offices, including individual drive-through facilities in communities in Idaho, Montana, Oregon, South Dakota, Washington, and Wyoming. The company was incorporated in 1971 and is based in Billings, Montana.



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How have states handled the COVID-19 crisis? New analysis shows Utah, Nebraska and Vermont were the best with Montana and Florida close behind

April 30, 2022

Montana Economy

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The Committee To Unleash Prosperity (CUP) has released the most comprehensive analysis to date on how states have handled the COVID-19 crisis. These results were also published by the National Bureau of Economic Research.

Picture/CUP

The State Report Card measures and compares state performance on three metrics: economy, education, and virus mortality. It answers the question: how have states managed to balance the health of their citizens, keep their economies functioning and limit job losses, and keep their schools open so that the children of school age do not suffer long-term educational setbacks.

Each of these three measures was weighted equally. The states that received an F grade were New Jersey, New York, California, Illinois and Washington, DC. These states scored poorly on every measure. They had high age-adjusted mortality rates; they had high unemployment and large GDP losses, and they kept their schools closed much longer than almost any other state.

The top performers were Utah, Nebraska and Vermont with Montana and Florida close behind.

The study verifies other studies that found the lockdown of businesses, stores, churches, schools and restaurants had almost no impact on health outcomes in any state. States with strict lockdowns performed almost no better on Covid death rates than states that remained mostly open for business.

The study also found that keeping schools closed had almost no impact on child or adult death rates, but had serious implications for students’ academic progress.

Learn more about CUP

You can read the full study here: https://committeetounleashprosperity.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/04/Which-States-Handled-the-Covid-Pandemic-Best.pdf

Meet Bill Spadea in New Jersey — May 2022

April 29, 2022

Montana Loans

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As you know, following the successful launch of my group common sense clubI decided to hit the road and meet as many New Jersey families, workers, business owners, and first responders as possible.

(Photo: Marla Snyder Rudich via Facebook)

(Photo: Marla Snyder Rudich via Facebook)

Fresh off of an energetic and jam-packed inaugural event”A seat at the table“, which we co-hosted with several New Jersey bands and the National”Conservative Political Action Conference“, we are looking at a full schedule of public events in May.

Hope to see you on the trail as we fight to restore freedom and prosperity to the Garden State!

Speech on Westfield NJ PBA / Golf Outing

Echo Country Club in Westfield, NJ

Monday, May 2; 6 p.m.

For more information, email [email protected]om


First Responder Appreciation Event

Chesapeake Tavern in Long Valley, NJ

Monday, May 2; 7 p.m.

For more information, email [email protected]


Meet and Greet Morris County with Curator Tom Mastrangelo

Park Savoy Estate in Florham Park, NJ

Wednesday May 4; 6 p.m.

For more information, email [email protected]


Speech by Montclair and Meet & Greet

Greek Tavern in Montclair, NJ

Thursday, May 5; 7 p.m.

For more information, email [email protected]


Bergen County Speech and Meeting

Bergen GOP Headquarters in Hackensack, NJ

Monday, May 9; 7 p.m.

For more information, email [email protected]


Morristown Parental Rights Town Hall

Morristown, New Jersey

Saturday May 14; 11 a.m.

Email [email protected] for address and details.


Forum on parental rights and Meet & Greet

Flemington, New Jersey

Saturday May 14; 1 p.m.

Email [email protected]


Rally and speech on parental rights

Cypress Tavern in Kinnelon, NJ

Tuesday May 17; 6:30 p.m.

Email [email protected]


Somerset Couty 200 club speech

The Palace in Somerset, NJ

Wednesday May 18; 12 p.m.

For more information, click HERE.


Franklin Township Speech and Meeting

Monday, May 23; 7 p.m.

Email [email protected] for location and details


Atlantic City Speech and Meet

Tuesday, May 24; 7 p.m.

Email [email protected] for location and details

The above post reflects the thoughts and observations of Bill Spadea, host of New Jersey talk show 101.5. All opinions expressed are those of Bill. Bill Spadea is on the air weekdays from 6-10 a.m., speaking from Jersey, taking your calls at 1-800-283-1015.

WATCH: States with the most new small businesses per capita

NJ Beach Tag Guide for Summer 2022

We are coming another summer to the Jersey Shore! Before you lose yourself in the excitement of sunny days on the sand, we calculate how much seasonal/weekly/daily beach beacons will cost you, and pre-season deals you can still take advantage of!

Bird flu is suspected cause of death of six geese in Rochester Park

April 28, 2022

Montana Lending

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Rochester, MN (KROC-AM News) – Avian flu is the suspected cause of death for six Canada geese found in Silver Lake Park.

City officials said a Rochester resident reported six dead Canada geese in the park. The Minnesota DNR has removed the remains and is testing for highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI).

If the geese test positive for HPAI, City of Rochester employees who potentially had contact with the infected birds will be monitored by the Minnesota Department of Health’s (MDH) Zoonotic Disease Unit.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), infections in people are rare. However, the disease can spread when enough of the virus gets into a person’s eyes, nose or mouth, or is inhaled. The spread of bird flu viruses from an infected person to close contact is rare, and when it has occurred has not led to continued spread among people.

Kim David/TSM

Kim David/TSM

“It’s rare to find a number of dead geese in the park with no apparent injuries,” Rochester Parks and Recreation Director Paul Widman said. We are taking precautions and working with county and state authorities to prepare for bird flu.

Widman said Rochester city parks will continue to be open to the public, but attendees should follow guidelines provided by Olmsted County Public Health (OCPH).

“Keeping away from wildlife is always recommended. Since the geese are currently in their nesting season, they tend to be a bit more aggressive than usual,” Widman said. “Park participants are encouraged to stay away from geese and other waterfowl.”

Kim David/TSM

Kim David/TSM

When bird flu is detected in Minnesota, a response zone is created around the infected premises to control movement and establish an area for testing and surveillance protocols to be performed. The Minnesota Board of Animal Health will determine if other birds near the park are infected.

Although people are not susceptible to bird flu, advice from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to prevent exposure includes:

  • Avoid direct contact with wild birds and observe them only from a distance.
  • Avoid contact with poultry that appear sick or dead.
  • Avoid contact with surfaces that appear to be contaminated with the droppings of wild or domestic birds
  • Wear gloves and wash your hands with soap and water if you must handle wild birds or sick or dead poultry.
  • Wear respiratory protection, such as a medical mask, when handling birds.
  • Change clothes before contact with healthy poultry and domestic birds.

Residents who keep chickens, ducks or other birds at risk for HPAI should follow guidelines provided by the Minnesota Department of Animal Health.

WATCH: States with the most new small businesses per capita

A political record in Sri Lanka as the economic crisis deepens

April 28, 2022

Montana Economy

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COLOMBO, Sri Lanka — Sherry Fonseka joined millions in 2019 to elect President Gotabaya Rajapaksa, a military strategist whose brutal campaign helped end Sri Lanka’s 30-year civil war 10 years earlier.

Now he is among thousands of people who for weeks have protested outside the president’s office, calling on Rajapaksa and his brother, Mahinda, who is prime minister, to step down for leading the country into its worst economic crisis since his independence from Great Britain in 1948. .

With the island on the verge of bankruptcy, Fonseka, who owns a small garment business in the capital, Colombo, has had to spend her own savings to pay the salaries of her 30 employees. But he knows he will have to let them go soon and knows clearly who is to blame.

“We all thought we made the right decision (to elect Rajapaksa), but we realized we were wrong. We should have the backbone to tell people and the world that we made a mistake,” he said. he declared.

In recent weeks, protests have erupted across the country demanding that Rajapaksa step down.

The protests highlight the dramatic fall of the Rajapaksas from Sri Lanka’s most powerful political dynasty in decades to a family seeking to retain power. Despite accusations of atrocities during the civil war, Gotabaya and Mahinda, who previously served as president, remained the heroes of much of the island’s Buddhist-Sinhalese majority and were firmly entrenched at the pinnacle of Sri Lankan politics. Lankan before the revolt of former supporters like Fonseka.

“The pendulum has swung from ‘it’s all about the Rajapaksas, it’s the people who saved this country’ to ‘it’s because of the Rajapaksas that the country is now ruined,'” said Harsha de Silva, economist and MP of the opposition. .

Rare admission of errors

The collapse of the Sri Lankan economy was rapid and painful. Imports of everything from milk to fuel have plummeted, leading to severe food shortages and power cuts. People were forced to queue for hours every day to buy basic necessities. Doctors have warned of a crippling shortage of lifesaving drugs in hospitals, and the government has suspended payments on $7 billion in foreign debts due this year alone.

“The Rajapaksas, like an octopus, have clung to every aspect of public life in Sri Lanka,” de Silva said. “They ruled it like it was their kingdom. They wanted it and they did it – it was like that and the people were with them.”

President Rajapaksa has defended his government, partly blaming the pandemic and Russia’s war in Ukraine. “This crisis was not created by me,” he said in a speech last month, adding that his government was working hard on solutions. They include the approach of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank to get help, after repeated calls for it.

But as protesters seethe, the president and prime minister have changed tact in recent weeks. They have admitted mistakes they have made which have exacerbated the crisis, such as the introduction of a short-lived ban last year on the import of chemical fertilizers which has seriously harmed farmers and the admission that they should have requested a bailout sooner.

Influential Buddhist monks have urged Rajapaksa to form an interim government under a new prime minister, signaling a further decline in the family’s image as protectors of the country’s 70% Buddhist-Sinhalese majority. Some observers say it is too early to gauge how much support for the Rajapaksas has dropped among their hardcore base, but for many their response has been too weak and too late.

“The government now recognizes several missteps, but this one comes at a huge cost to the people,” said Bhavani Fonseka, senior fellow at the Colombo-based Center for Policy Alternatives.

Tax cuts spur credit downgrades

The Rajapaksas were a powerful landowning family who for decades dominated local elections in their rural southern district, before taking the helm of national politics in 2005 when Mahinda was elected president. He remained in power until 2015, overseeing the end of the civil war against Tamil rebels in 2009, before losing to opposition led by his former aide.

The suicide bombings that killed 290 people on Easter Sunday in 2019 paved the way for the return of the Rajapaksas, this time as Gotabaya launched an acute nationalist campaign that sparked outrage and disillusionment with the previous government over the attacks.

He vowed to return to the tough nationalism that had made his family popular with the Buddhist majority, and also to lift the country out of an economic slump with a message of stability and development.

Tourism had fallen sharply after the bombings and Sri Lanka badly needed to boost its revenue to service a series of foreign loans for splashy infrastructure projects. Some involved Chinese money and were commissioned during his brother’s presidency, but failed to create profits, instead collecting debts.

Just days into his presidency, Rajapaksa imposed the biggest tax cuts in Sri Lanka’s history to boost spending, even as critics warned it would squeeze government finances. According to Nishan de Mel, executive director of Verité Research, Sri Lanka’s tax base has fallen by 30%.

“When you do something like that, you have some sort of internal analysis or document that shows why those cuts might help the economy. There was nothing like that,” de Mel said.

The move triggered an immediate sanction from the global market as creditors downgraded Sri Lanka’s ratings, preventing it from borrowing more money as its foreign exchange reserves continued to dwindle. Then the coronavirus hit, further crushing tourism as debt snowballed.

The middle class takes to the streets to demonstrate

Analysts say the Rajapaksas’ response to economic challenges has underscored the limits of their strongman politics and their family’s virtual monopoly on decision-making, relying heavily on the military to enforce policy and enact laws to weaken independent institutions.

Three other members of the Rajapaksa family were in Cabinet until early April, when the Cabinet resigned en masse in response to protests.

“Their whole political ideology and credibility is in serious crisis,” said Jayadeva Uyangoda, a seasoned political scientist.

But many fear that things will only get worse before they get better. A divided and weak opposition without a majority in parliament kept the Rajapaksas in power. An IMF bailout could see austerity measures intensify hardship for people before there is relief.

Meanwhile, the focus remains on protests, which attract people of all ethnicities, religions and social classes. For the first time, middle-class Sri Lankans took to the streets in large numbers, Uyangoda said.

Among them, Wijaya Nanda Chandradewa, who joined the crowd outside the president’s office on Saturday. A retired government worker, Chandradewa said he succumbed to Rajapaksa’s promise to rebuild a Sri Lanka scarred by the 2019 attacks.

“He said there would be a country and a law – now there is neither the law nor the country,” Chandradewa said, adding that the only option now is for Rajapaksa to step down.

“He showed us a fairyland and deceived and misled us,” he said. “We have to fix our mistakes and build a system to bring in the right leader.”

Copyright 2022 NPR. To learn more, visit https://www.npr.org.

The popular New Jersey brunch restaurant will now offer franchises

April 26, 2022

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Apparently, the concept of a restaurant that only serves breakfast, lunch and brunch is proving popular, as Turning Point announced its first franchise deal.

There are already 21 Turning Points in New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Delaware (13 in NJ).

The upcoming 22 in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, specifically in Upper Dublin, will be the first franchise location.

In a statement, the company said Turning Point is reinventing the breakfast, brunch and lunch experience by offering unique, creatively designed seasonal options in an environment that feels like home.

The restaurants are open from 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The company says the limited hours make owning a franchise even more attractive, providing a better quality of life for the owner as well as the employees. “Our franchisees can say goodbye to 80-hour workweeks and say hello to spending more time with loved ones and in control of their financial destinies.”

Some of Turning Point’s menu offerings include Avocado Smash Benny, Yankee Shrimp & Cheddar Grits, ‘OMG’ French Toast, as well as French pressed coffee ground by order.

Kirk Ruoff founded Turning Point in 1998 in Little Silver.

“Over the past 23 years, we’ve honed our skills to create this special concept, and we’re looking for talented, hard-working people to help us grow,” Ruoff said. “We are looking for successful, family-oriented restaurateurs with strong community ties to represent and implement the values ​​of Turning Point.”

If you want to be a franchisee, it is better to have a lot of money; according to a release, the initial investment to become a Turning Point franchisee ranges from $695,000 to $1,195,000, which includes an initial franchise fee of $45,000.

The opening of the new site is scheduled for May.

The views expressed in the above post are those of New Jersey 101.5 talk show host Bill Doyle only.

You can now listen to Deminski & Doyle — On demand! Listen to New Jersey’s favorite radio show every day of the week. Download the Deminski & Doyle show wherever you get podcasts, on our free app, or listen now:

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Asian stocks rise on the back of Wall Street rally | national news

April 26, 2022

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Asian stocks were mostly higher on Tuesday after U.S. stocks turned from steep losses to post solid gains.

Tokyo, Hong Kong and Seoul advanced while Sydney fell.

Shanghai retreated on renewed concerns over pandemic shutdowns that could further weigh on the world’s second-largest economy and hamper global economic growth.

The Shanghai Composite Index fell 0.9% to 2902.46, giving up early gains. On Monday, it fell 5.1%.

China’s capital, Beijing, has started mass testing of more than 3 million people and restricted residents of part of the city to their compounds, raising concerns about a wider lockdown similar to Shanghai. This city has been closed for more than two weeks and this has already prompted the International Monetary Fund to revise downwards its growth forecasts for the Chinese economy.

Hong Kong’s Hang Seng, which lost 3.7% on Monday, was trading up 0.7% at 20,000.69.

The Kospi in Seoul gained 0.5% to 2,669.41 after the government announced that South Korea’s economy grew at an annual rate of 3.1% in the first quarter of the year, up from 0.7% compared to the previous quarter.

Economy rebounds from pandemic woes as government lifts COVID restrictions as case numbers dwindle after surge of omicron variant.

“This should lead to a rebound in downtrodden parts of the service sector. And a further decline in precautionary savings should provide an additional boost to consumption,” Alex Holmes of Capital Economics said in a commentary. “With private consumption still well below pre-pandemic levels, it there’s plenty of room for a rebound,” he said.

In Tokyo, the Nikkei 225 rose 0.4% to 26,700.11 and India’s Sensex gained 1.2% to 57,254.49.

Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 fell 1.9% to 7,331.30.

WE. Benchmark oil gained 92 cents to $99.46 a barrel in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. It lost $3.53 to $98.54 on Monday.

Brent crude, the standard for international oil pricing, gained 1.23 cents to $103.39 a barrel.

The dollar slipped to 127.89 Japanese yen from 128.14 yen on Monday night. The euro fell from $1.0713 to $1.0727.

On Monday, the S&P 500 climbed 0.6% to 4,296.12 after erasing an early 1.7% loss. The rally was led by shares of internet-related companies, including Twitter, which jumped 5.7% after agreeing to let Tesla CEO and tweeter extraordinaire Elon Musk buy it.

The Dow Jones industrial average rose 0.7% to 34,049.46, while the Nasdaq composite rose 1.3% to 13,004.85.

The S&P 500 is coming off a three-week losing streak, plagued by concerns over the Federal Reserve’s plans to accelerate interest rate hikes to rein in high inflation.

Gains in several large tech-related stocks were the strongest forces to lift the S&P 500 on Monday, including a 2.4% gain for Microsoft and a 2.9% rise for Class A shares of the Google’s parent company, Alphabet.

Both are expected to release their latest quarterly results on Tuesday.

Wall Street is in the midst of one of the most important periods of earnings season. Apple, Microsoft, Amazon and parent company Google are all on deck to report this week. As they are among the largest companies by market value, their movements have the most influence on the S&P 500.

Concerns are also high about a sharp slowdown in the US economy or even a recession due to the large interest rate hikes the Fed is expected to impose.

Besides their bottom line, investors are also looking for a better view of how big companies in technology, manufacturing and retail are handling rising inflation and supply chain issues. .

Inflation remains a major concern for investors. Investors are worried about whether the Fed will be able to raise rates enough to stifle inflation, but not enough to cause a recession. The Federal Reserve Chairman indicated that the central bank may raise short-term interest rates to double the usual amount at upcoming meetings, starting next week. The Fed has already raised its overnight rate once, the first such hike since 2018.

Wall Street will also receive key economic data this week. The Conference Board will release its consumer confidence measure for April on Tuesday. The Commerce Department will release its first-quarter gross domestic product report on Thursday.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

Late buying push pushes stock indexes up on Wall Street | national news

April 25, 2022

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NEW YORK (AP) — A late wave of buying left major indexes higher on Wall Street after another day of trading up and down. A rebound in tech stocks helped turn the tide in the final hour of trading on Monday. The S&P 500 closed 0.6% higher and the tech-heavy Nasdaq added 1.3%. Dow Jones industrials rose 0.7%. The S&P 500 is coming off a three-week losing streak amid concerns about high inflation and the rapid increase in interest rates the Federal Reserve is likely to prescribe for it. Bond prices have risen. The yield on the 10-year Treasury fell to 2.83%.

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. AP’s previous story follows below.

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks on Wall Street erased their steep morning losses and are holding relatively steady on Monday, the latest in a string of upside trades.

The S&P 500 was virtually unchanged, as of 2:46 p.m. EST, coming back from an early loss of 1.7%. The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 94 points, or 0.3%, to 33,905 after erasing an earlier loss of 488 points, and the Nasdaq composite rose 0.8%.

Stocks have been fragile recently, with the S&P 500 emerging from a three-week losing streak, amid concerns about high inflation and the rapid hike in interest rates the Federal Reserve is likely to prescribe. Strong earnings reports for the first three months of the year from major US corporations had offered some support, but even that looked less robust after several mixed forecasts last week.

Investors are now in the middle of one of the most important periods of earnings season. Apple, Microsoft, Amazon and the parents of Facebook and Google are all on deck to report this week. And because they are among the largest companies by market value, their movements have the most influence on the S&P 500.

Earlier in the morning, US stocks were on course to follow global markets lower, particularly in China, on fears that strict lockdown measures there could jeopardize the world’s second largest economy and potentially damage the global economic growth. Hong Kong’s Hang Seng fell 3.7%. The Shanghai Composite fell 5.1%.

China’s capital, Beijing, began mass testing of more than 3 million people on Monday and restricted residents of part of the city to their compounds, raising concerns about a broader lockdown similar to Shanghai. This city has been closed for more than two weeks and this has already prompted the International Monetary Fund to revise downwards its growth forecasts for the Chinese economy.

Prices for ultra-safe US government bonds rose as traders feared the risk. The 10-year Treasury yield, which affects rates on mortgages and other consumer loans, fell to 2.82% from 2.90% on Friday evening.

Energy companies were among the biggest losers as US crude oil prices fell 2.9%. Exxon Mobil fell 3.4%.

Banking and industrial stocks also fell. Bank of America fell 1.1% and Lockheed Martin 1%.

Communication actions were in the lead. Twitter jumped 6% after the social media company agreed to be taken private by Tesla CEO Elon Musk for $54.20 a share, or about $44 billion.

Rising inflation remains a major concern for investors. Investors continue to focus on the measures taken by central banks to contain it. The Federal Reserve Chairman indicated that the central bank may raise short-term interest rates to double the usual amount at upcoming meetings, starting next week. The Fed has already raised its overnight rate once, the first such hike since 2018.

Wall Street will also receive key economic data this week. The Conference Board will release its consumer confidence measure for April on Tuesday. The Commerce Department will release its first-quarter gross domestic product report on Thursday.

It’s also a busy week for US corporate earnings reports. Google’s parent company, Alphabet, and General Motors will release their results on Tuesday, along with Microsoft and Visa. Boeing, Ford and Facebook parent Meta are on deck to report results on Wednesday. McDonald’s, Amazon and Apple report Thursday.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

Stocks fall on Wall Street, extending market losses | national news

April 25, 2022

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NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks fell broadly in morning trading on Wall Street on Monday, as worries about rising inflation and interest rate hikes weighed on investors and prolonged market losses.

The S&P 500 fell 1.2% at 10:19 a.m. EST, and more than 90% of stocks in the index lost ground. The drop follows a weak end last weekend that sent the benchmark index sinking for a third straight week.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 371 points, or 1.1%, to 33,440 and the Nasdaq fell 0.6%.

US stocks are trailing global markets lower, particularly in China, on concerns that strict containment measures it could crimp the world’s second largest economy and potentially harm global economic growth. Hong Kong’s Hang Seng fell 3.7%. The Shanghai Composite fell 5.1%.

China’s capital, Beijing, began mass testing of more than 3 million people on Monday and restricted residents of part of the city to their compounds, raising concerns about a broader lockdown similar to Shanghai. This city has been closed for more than two weeks and this has already prompted the International Monetary Fund to revise downwards its growth forecasts for the Chinese economy.

Prices for ultra-safe US government bonds rose as traders feared the risk. The 10-year Treasury yield, which affects rates on mortgages and other consumer loans, fell significantly to 2.78% from 2.90% on Friday evening.

Energy companies were among the biggest losers as US crude oil prices fell 5.6%. Exxon Mobil fell 5.2%.

Banks and technology stocks also fell sharply. Bank of America fell 3.2% and Apple 1.6%.

Twitter rose 3.4% and was one of the few bright spots in the market. The social media company and Tesla CEO Elon Musk is reportedly negotiating a takeover offer.

Rising inflation remains a major concern for investors. Investors continue to focus on actions taken by central banks to mitigate the impact on businesses and consumers. The Federal Reserve Chairman indicated that the central bank may raise short-term interest rates to double the usual amount at upcoming meetings, starting next week. The Fed has already raised its overnight rate once, the first such hike since 2018.

Investors have a heavy week of corporate earnings ahead. Reactions to the latest round of corporate report cards were mixed, and several disappointing earnings reports last week rattled what was the market’s main pillar of support.

Beverage giant Coca-Cola was virtually unchanged on Monday after reporting strong financial results. Parent company Google, Alphabet and General Motors will release their results on Tuesday, along with Microsoft and Visa. Boeing, Ford and Facebook parent Meta are on deck to report results on Wednesday.

Thursday is a particularly busy day and will include reports from industrial giant Caterpillar, McDonald’s, Amazon and Apple, among others.

Wall Street will also receive key economic data this week. The Conference Board will release its consumer confidence measure for April on Tuesday. The Commerce Department will release its first-quarter gross domestic product report on Thursday.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

Bitcoin miners go green

April 24, 2022

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HELEN, Mont. – Over the past year, a company that “mines” cryptocurrency had what seemed like the perfect place for its thousands of power-thirsty computers working around the clock to verify bitcoin transactions: the lands of a coal-fired power plant in rural Montana.

But with the cryptocurrency industry under increasing pressure to limit the environmental impact of its massive electricity consumption, Marathon Digital Holdings made the decision to pack up its computers, called miners, and move them to a wind farm in Texas.

“For us, it comes down to the fact that we don’t want to run on fossil fuels,” said company CEO Fred Thiel.

In the world of bitcoin mining, access to cheap and reliable electricity is paramount. But many economists and environmentalists have warned that as the still largely misunderstood digital currency rises in price – and with it in popularity – the mining process that is central to its existence and value is becoming increasingly more energy-intensive and potentially unsustainable.

Bitcoin was created in 2009 as a new way to pay for things that would not be subject to central bank or government oversight. Although it has yet to widely catch on as a payment method, it has seen its popularity increase in speculative investing despite volatility that can swing its price wildly. In March 2020, one bitcoin was worth just over $5,000. This hit a record high of over $67,000 in November before dropping to just over $35,000 in January.

The core bitcoin technology is the process by which transactions are verified and then recorded on what is called the blockchain. Computers connected to the bitcoin network race to solve complex mathematical calculations that verify transactions, with the winner earning newly minted bitcoins as a reward. Currently, when a machine solves the puzzle, its owner is rewarded with 6.25 bitcoins, with a total value of around $260,000. The system is calibrated to release 6.25 bitcoins every 10 minutes.

When bitcoin was first invented, the puzzles could be solved using an ordinary personal computer, but the technology was designed so that the problems became harder to solve as more and more more miners work there. These mining operations today use specialized machines that have no monitors and look more like a high-tech fan than a traditional computer. The amount of energy used by computers to solve puzzles increases as more computers join in the effort and the puzzles become more difficult.

Marathon Digital, for example, currently has around 37,000 miners, but hopes to have 199,000 online by early next year, the company said.

It is difficult to determine the amount of energy used by the industry because not all mining companies report their use and some operations are mobile, moving storage containers full of miners across the country in search of energy. Low cost.

The Cambridge Bitcoin Electricity Consumption Index estimates that bitcoin mining has used about 109 terawatt hours of electricity over the past year, nearly the amount used in Virginia in 2020, according to US Energy. Information Center. The current usage rate would be 143 terawatt hours over a full year, about the amount used by Ohio or New York State in 2020.

The Cambridge estimate does not include the energy used to mine other cryptocurrencies.

A key moment in the debate over bitcoin’s power consumption came last spring, when just weeks after Tesla Motors said it was buying $1.5 billion worth of bitcoin and would also accept digital currency as a medium. payment for electric vehicles, CEO Elon Musk joined critics in calling out the industry’s energy use and said the company would no longer take payment.

Some want the government to intervene with regulation.

In New York, Governor Kathy Hochul is under pressure to declare a moratorium on the proof-of-work mining method — the one bitcoin uses — and to deny an air quality permit for a power plant project. modernized coal-fired electric that runs on natural gas.

A New York state judge recently ruled that the project would not affect the air or water of nearby Seneca Lake.

“Refueling or expanding coal and gas plants to make play money in the midst of a climate crisis is literally insane,” Yvonne Taylor, vice president of Seneca Lake Guardians, said in a statement.

Anne Hedges of the Montana Environmental Information Center said that before Marathon Digital arrived, environmental groups expected the coal-fired power plant in Hardin, Montana to shut down.

“It was a death watch,” Hedges said. “We received their quarterly reports. We were looking at how well they worked. We saw it continue to decline year after year – and last year that totally changed. It would have disappeared without the bitcoin. The cryptocurrency industry “needs to find a way to reduce its energy demand” and needs to be regulated, Hedges said. “That’s all there is to it. It’s unsustainable.” Some say the solution is to switch from proof-of-work verification to proof-of-stake verification, which is already used by some cryptocurrency companies. currencies. With proof-of-stake, the verification of digital currency transfers is left to computers, rather than having them compete. Individuals or groups who bet more on their cryptocurrency are more likely to get the job – and the reward.

Although the method uses much less electricity, some critics claim that proof-of-stake blockchains are less secure.

Some companies in the industry recognize that there is a problem and commit to achieving net zero emissions – without adding greenhouse gases to the atmosphere – from the electricity they use by 2030 by signing a crypto climate accord, modeled after the Paris climate accord.

“All crypto communities should work together, as a matter of urgency, to ensure that crypto does not further aggravate global warming, but instead becomes a net positive contributor to the vital transition to a low-carbon global economy” , states the agreement.

Marathon Digital is one of many companies pinning their hopes on harnessing excess renewable energy from solar and wind farms in Texas. Earlier this month, Block-stream Mining and Block, formerly Square, announced they were opening a small off-grid mining facility in Texas using solar panels and Tesla batteries.

“This is a step to prove our thesis that bitcoin mining can fund zero-emission power infrastructure,” said Adam Back, CEO and co-founder of Blockstream.

Companies say cryptocurrency mining can provide an economic incentive to build more renewable energy projects and help stabilize power grids. Miners give renewable energy producers a guaranteed customer, making it easier to get financing for projects and produce electricity at full capacity.

Mining companies are able to contract for cheaper power because “all the power they use can be shut off and returned to the grid at any time,” Thiel said.

In Pennsylvania, Stronghold Digital is cleaning up hundreds of years of coal waste by burning it to create what the state classifies as renewable energy that can be sent to the grid or used in bitcoin mining, depending on demand. of electricity.

The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection is a partner in the work, which is using relatively new technology to burn coal waste more efficiently and with fewer emissions. Left alone, piles of coal waste can ignite and burn for years, releasing greenhouse gases. When wet, waste coal releases acid into local waterways.

After using the waste coal to generate electricity, what remains is “non-toxic fly ash,” which is state-registered as clean fertilizer, said Stronghold Digital spokeswoman Naomi Harrington. .

As Marathon Digital gradually moves its 30,000 miners out of Montana, it leaves behind tens of millions of dollars in mining infrastructure.

Just because M a – thon no longer wants to use coal power doesn’t mean there won’t be another bitcoin miner to replace it. Thiel said he assumed power plant owners would find a company to do just that.

“No reason not to,” he said.

When bitcoin was first invented, the puzzles could be solved using an ordinary personal computer, but the technology was designed so that the problems became harder to solve as more and more more miners work there.

Supermarket car parks targeted by thieves

April 22, 2022

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POHATCONG — There may be evidence of an ongoing scam in the parking lots of grocery stores and supermarkets in Warren County, according to police responding to the latest such incident on Thursday.

Pohatcong Township Police Department said on facebook that one of its agents was dispatched to the parking lot of Aldi to speak with an elderly victim who claimed her wallet had been stolen – but it did not happen outside that store.

Instead, the woman told police she was in her vehicle outside the ShopRite in nearby Greenwich Township earlier on Thursday when she was approached by someone she described as a hispanic man.

Police said the woman told them the man showed her lug nuts from a vehicle tire and explained, in broken English, that the pieces had come loose from his car.

When she rolled down her window, according to the inquest, the man took her wallet and fled on foot.

Pohatcong police say they have seen “several similar cases” this year which are “very alarming” and have already made one arrest.

Police Chief Scott Robb confirmed in an email to New Jersey 101.5 that the arrest stemmed from an incident about a month ago at the Pohatcong Stop & Shop.

Police say all of the encounters involved a Hispanic male, and the police department said it will release photos soon.

Anyone with further information is urged to contact the authorities.

Patrick Lavery is a reporter and anchor for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach him at [email protected]

Click here to contact an editor about a comment or correction for this story.

WATCH: States with the most new small businesses per capita

Municipal tax bill for every city and town in NJ, filed

Just under 30 cents of every $1 of property taxes collected in New Jersey supports municipal services provided by cities, townships, boroughs, and villages. Statewide, the average municipal tax bill alone in 2021 was $2,725, but that varied widely from over $13,000 in Tavistock to nothing in three townships. In addition to the $9.22 billion in taxes for municipal purposes, special tax districts that in some locations provide municipal services such as fire protection, garbage collection or economic development collected 323, $8 million in 2021.

How the World Seen New Jersey—1940s to 1980s

This is how New Jersey saw the world from 1940 to 1980. All of these photos are from AP and Getty publications, which means they were used in a magazine or newspaper. There have been many inventions and stories made in New Jersey. Check the photos below.

‘Mistake’ to limit opening hours at border ports as economy suffers

April 22, 2022

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HELENA — U.S. Sen. Jon Tester (D-Mont.) says he may not have the medical skills, but sees the continued economic impact along the border of the pandemic restrictions.

He is once again calling for U.S. border crossings to resume full service. Tester has been pushing for a return to normal border operations over the past year, citing diminishing COVID-19 concerns that forced the United States and Canada to restrict crossings in 2020.

As traffic resumed with an ever-changing list of requirements, U.S. border crossings continue to limit hours of operation, which Tester said is hard to fathom.

“I’m a land farmer. I’m not a doctor, but I’ll tell you, for people who’ve been vaccinated, it doesn’t make a difference,” Tester said. “And for those who haven’t been, go out and get vaccinated and open the border.”

Noting that Montana had nearly $700 million in Canadian exports in 2018, Tester says full reopening is essential for agriculture and tourism.

“All of these things have impacts. They have economic impacts. They have impacts,” Tester said. “Be able for businesses to succeed. And I just think if we really want to get the economy back on track, and it’s going pretty well right now, but making sure those ports are open is really important. “

It is important for individuals as well. Eureka’s Brandy Carvey sent us photos of her family trying to enjoy an Easter Sunday gathering at Lake Koocanusa, roasting hot dogs through the barbed wire fence. The tester says reopening would help ease the ongoing financial and emotional pinch for residents living “across the border”.

“I think it’s the right thing to do, especially if you want to do certain things to try to influence inflation,” Tester said. “Because the supply chain is a major cause of the inflation we are currently experiencing.”

There have been past fights with Customs and Border Patrol over cutting operations at some of the remote border crossings. The tester says he’s not concerned about this, but he offered a warning.

“If you want to talk about closing ports or permanently reducing hours, let’s have this debate. We’ve had this before. We’ve won. And we’ll have it again, and we’ll win again.” the tester. “But the main thing is to close the ports to keep the hours down because the pandemic, I think, is a mistake.”

Tester also opposes efforts to lift the immigration provisions of “Title 42” without having a better staffing and security plan along the northern border.

USDA invests nearly $800 million in climate-smart infrastructure for Earth Day

April 22, 2022

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In honor of Earth Day 2022, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced that the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) is investing nearly $800 million in climate-smart infrastructure (PDF, 587 KB) in 40 states, Puerto Rico and the Northern Mariana Islands. These investments will strengthen the health and livelihoods of people in rural America. They include the financing of 165 projects aimed at increasing access to drinking water and/or clean energy for people living in disadvantaged communities.

The announcement is part of the Biden-Harris administration Build a Better America Rural Infrastructure Tour, in which Biden administration officials travel to dozens of rural communities to talk about the impact of investments in the bipartisan infrastructure law, as well as President Biden’s broader commitment to ensuring that federal resources reach every community in rural America. This announcement also advances the President’s Justice40 initiative, which commits to providing at least 40% of the benefits of federal climate and clean energy investments to underprivileged communities.

Secretary Thomas J. Vilsack. USDA photo by Tom Witham

“People in rural America are experiencing the impacts of climate change in many ways. This includes more severe droughts, more frequent wildfires, and more destructive and potentially deadly storms,” Vilsack said. “When we invest in rural community infrastructure, we invest in our planet, and we also invest in peace of mind for families when children drink clean, safe tap water in their homes. The USDA is proud to celebrate the Day Earth and the many ways we are fighting climate change and investing in local solutions to bring clean water and renewable energy to people in rural areas around the world.

USDA Rural Development is taking several steps to mitigate the impacts of climate change in rural communities.

Advancing Equity in Rural Communities

USDA Rural Development is prioritize projects that advance the Biden-Harris administration’s top priorities of investing in rural communities to ensure people have equitable access to critical resources and address the climate crisis. Investments in these communities will impact generations to come.

For example, 165 projects announced today will help advance equity in rural communities, especially those that have been socially vulnerable, distressed and underserved for far too long.

Clean energy infrastructure and energy efficiency improvements

The USDA is investing $787 million in renewable energy infrastructure in 36 states to help agricultural producers, rural small business owners and residents reduce energy costs and make energy efficiency improvements. The Department makes investments under the Electric Loan Program and the Rural Energy Program for America (REAP).

Through REAP, the Department is helping 157 rural businesses and agricultural producers gain access to clean energy, while reducing their carbon footprint to make their business operations more profitable.

For example, in South Carolina, Limelight Solar I LLC will use a $2.1 million REAP loan to purchase and install a 2.5 megawatt solar system. The system is expected to produce 3.9 million kilowatt hours per year, enough electricity to power 362 homes in the city of Spartanburg.

Electric program funding includes nearly $67 million for smart grid technologies that improve system operations and monitor grid security.

For example, in Pennsylvania, REA Energy Cooperative Inc. will use a $16 million power program loan to connect 635 customers and build and upgrade 186 miles of power lines. This loan includes $6.5 million in smart grid technologies, including 35 miles of aerial fiber.

Infrastructure improvements for communities affected by extreme weather conditions

USDA is investing $12 million to help rural communities affected by severe weather. The funds will benefit people living in 17 states, the Northern Mariana Islands and Puerto Rico. The Department makes investments under the Community Facility Disaster Grants program and the Disaster Loan and Grant Program for Water and Waste Disposal.

The funds will help communities build back better by mitigating health risks and improving access to safe and reliable drinking water and sanitary waste disposal services. The funds will also purchase emergency response equipment to help communities be better prepared and more resilient to disasters.

For example, in Puerto Rico, Acueducto Rural Comunidades Especiales Bayamocito Inc. will use a $30,000 disaster water and waste disposal grant to purchase a new 20 kilowatt generator with an automatic transfer switch. This grant will help ensure residents of Aguas Buenas, a community hit by Hurricane Maria in 2017, have access to safe and reliable drinking water in the event of a future natural disaster.

The City of Graceville, Minnesota will use an $11,000 Community Disaster Facility Grant to purchase and install an emergency storm siren. The siren will alert residents of the community to a risk of severe weather.

The USDA is announcing awards today under multiple programs in Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Mississippi and Montana. , North Carolina, North Dakota, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Virginia, Vermont, Washington, Wisconsin, West Virginia , Wyoming, Northern Mariana Islands and Puerto Rico.

Background: Building a Better America Rural Infrastructure Tour

Under the leadership of the Biden-Harris administration, the USDA and its federal partners in the Infrastructure Implementation Working Group work with rural communities to deliver on their promise to support rural America.

The Building a Better America Rural Infrastructure Tour is a multi-faceted outreach effort involving cabinet and sub-cabinet representatives from federal agencies as they travel and learn from key rural communities. These tours will highlight new federal funding and investments already underway through the bipartisan Infrastructure Act, a once-in-a-generation investment that will support rural communities and their infrastructure needs.

The USDA touches the lives of all Americans every day in so many positive ways. In the Biden-Harris administration, the USDA is transforming the US food system with greater emphasis on more resilient local and regional food production, fairer markets for all producers, ensuring access to safe food, healthy and nutritious in all communities, creating new markets and income streams for farmers and producers using climate-smart food and forestry practices, making historic investments in clean energy infrastructure and capacity in the rural America, and committing to equity across the department by removing systemic barriers and creating a workforce that is more representative of America. To learn more, visit www.usda.gov.

Under the Biden-Harris administration, Rural Development provides loans and grants to help expand economic opportunity, create jobs and improve the quality of life for millions of Americans in rural areas. This aid supports the improvement of infrastructure; Business development; lodging; community facilities such as schools, public safety and health care; and high-speed Internet access in rural, tribal and very poor areas. For more information, visit www.rd.usda.gov.

Climate-smart infrastructure