Aging farmers, dying farmland

December 6, 2021

Montana Loans

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Aging farmers, dying farmland

Credit to Farmers

The expansion of the farm or ranch involves an investment in capital, and is especially challenging for those who are only beginning their journey in business. We have designed loan programs for farmers that are younger than of 35 or who have more than ten years of experience. They are comparable to our loan options that have modified the criteria for approval of credit in order to accommodate this need in the following manner. This program will allow you to get the money you require like this, while also aiding you to improve your financial position.

“At present, the production of eggs is the thing I’m most interested in and also something my grandfather was interested in. About 90 percent of eggs that are produced in the United States [are produced by the 60 farms that are owned by the company” Spencer explained.

Montana along with Montana and the United States of America are not the only countries that are experiencing a shift towards industrialization. As America shifts away from farms that were owned by families and towards growth, corporations are have a greater say in and control of the agricultural sector, using central processing facilities as well as manufacturing cheap products to satisfy the needs of the consumer. Shipping is available throughout in the United States and internationally A increase in the number of farms controlled by companies according to USDA statistics, occurred between 2012 and 2017. The increase was around 10 percent between 2012 and 2017. The amount of farms that are owned and operated by private individuals or households has declined by about the same amount during the same time.

Spencer is a real person in this sense. “I’m not certain if there’s any issue with this. This is just how things are at the moment “he explained. “There always is food to be found. Which do you believe it could be? Are you more a fan of family-owned farms to corporate farms? The agricultural sector will be increasingly controlled by corporate. Since a long time the big firms have attempted to consolidate their control over their businesses in operations and industries.”

The evolution of the American agriculture system however it has its own set of consequences. Small farms and ranches make important economic contributions to local economies, investing money into the local economy selling their products to communities, as well as also creating jobs for the local community. Rural communities are harmed when the longevity is at risk as well as when the employment opportunities available for the agricultural sector are cut down.

“Isn’t it the case that when you purchase something from Walmart there’s no transaction cost and there is no investment in our economy? The location is Walmart’s headquarters “The Community Food & Agriculture Coalition (CFAC) is an organization based in Missoula which works to create regional and local food infrastructure According to Bonnie Buckingham, executive director of the group. It’s feasible in the western part of Montana. “Community and value” is created in the sense that people are connected with their local communities through food, purchasing products from farmers, or by participating in events that bring people together. For producers, these kinds of events help strengthen bonds between the participants in the community.

The smaller farms also are green, as they tend to not use an excessive amount of toxic pesticides and will be more likely to aid in the protection of the species diversity in the agricultural and ecological realm as well as other advantages. They also have a higher ethical standard from an animal’s point viewpoint than most people. Spencer is a great example. He feeds his chickens a 100 100% vegetarian diet and keeps in cages which he claims is the most humane approach.

It is possible that farms like Spencer’s could be destroyed completely due to development, which will result in irreparable erosion of soil. Only a small amount of Montana’s topsoil could be utilized for agriculture however, only in small amounts. As per the CFAC the CFAC, just 8 percent of the land of Missoula County, for example has soils suitable for the production of agricultural crops. It would take about 1000 years to make three centimeters of topsoil out of the soil developed over the course of many thousands of years.

The majority of the soil is in the lower part of Missoula Valley, which happens to be the exact location that developers are currently eyeing to develop. If the soil isn’t properly prepared for paver and paving, it will not be able to carry out vital ecological functions like food production or water retention. It is also able to absorb carbon dioxide, which is a vital service to the ecosystem, and becomes more important as policymakers try to slow the progression of global warming.

“It is possible that the soil could be lost forever should we not safeguard it today. This kind of soil might be located in a field that can be grazed with horses, or just left to grow grass. It could be possible to obtain viable productive, productive, as well as productive soils near term which can be protected similar way as described in this article “Buckingham stated. If there’s a structure or industry located on it, or the land is dispersed and divided, we will never be able cultivate food on the soil.

In the course of addressing certain issues that confront the state, non-profit organizations and officials from government have come up with inventive ways to broaden its activities and engage more people.We’ll be in the process of ending our current state of things if we don’t safeguard it in its current shape.

One example of this could be Trust Montana. Trust Montana is a non-profit entity committed to the preservation of the agricultural land across the state. The organization was previously focused around the protection of low-cost housing However, in May 2020, the organization partnered along with other organisations, such as the Agrarian Trust and the Vilicus Training Institute in order to create the Montana Agrarian Commons, which is currently at its third year in operation. To stop the development of land that is not agricultural communities will be granted conservation easements that permit the parcel of land to remain an estate of trust to be used by the community, and it will be let to new farmers at a reasonable cost. Agrarian Commons is a program which can offer a unique selling opportunity for farmers and ranchers who have retired who wish to see their land be managed and developed with respect for the environment.

“Agrarian commons are designed to protect land for agriculture use in perpetuity to benefit of the future generations. Farmers also have leases for long-term tenure of their land “King-Ries explained. “And we’re seeking ways to assist farmers in earning cash and creating equity in a way similar to the way owners or landowners achieve this without the property getting sold for market value , and without the property becoming a commodity in its own.”

CFAC has adopted a unique approach to establishing a website named Farm Link Montana, which is designed to aid those who are new to farming, retiring and those who want to sell their farm land. The website, according to Mary Ellis, the new Farm Programs Coordinator of the coalition’s Beginning Farmers and Ranchers Program is an “kind match service.” She described it as such.”The retired farmer may be able collaborate with them to help them move gradually to larger areas or make a deal to sign a lease or a partnership together for a specific duration and for a limited time period,’ Ellis explained. So, I’m hoping to make it easier for farmers looking to get started. ”

According to Ellis the range of matches is from two to five games every year go over the normal investigation phase in the procedure. Even though that it is an insignificant amount, “in our program, we believe it is an impressive achievement when compared to other aspects to be taken into consideration,” she explained.

“This item has been tested on the field. Farmer-approved. The program offers grants of between $5,000 and $5,000 to farms in order to aid new farmers at the beginning stages the process of establishing their farms. A collaboration with Kiva which is a non-profit organisation which provides loans to those who make the difference in their community, allows the organization to provide small loans to farms and other agriculture-related enterprises.

Zach Brown of the Gallatin County Commission has been working with the Gallatin County Commission to aid farmers who are just beginning in their careers as farmers and face financial challenges. This legislation, dubbed the Montana Farmer Student Loan Assistance Program legislation that he wrote was approved by the year of 2019. The new farmers and ranchers could get up to 50 percent of their student loan payments through this scheme, managed through the State Department of Agriculture. Individuals who decide to work in the field could discover that the debt is an enormous obstacle to their dreams.

“Essentially the thing it’s doing is creating a process by which a prospective farmer or rancher could submit an application to government officials for loans aid program.” writes the book’s author. Brown has shared his ideas. Therefore that when they return to their ranches or farms they aid in the payment of students’ loans

MORGAN ROSE was one of the first organizations to be granted assistance with the repayment of loans from The Ministry of Agriculture’s Repayment Assistance Program. Dillon, Montana, is the home of Rose who is a fourth generation Montana breeder birthed and raised in the tiny town of only a few hundred people located in the southwest region of the state. It has the estimated number of people residing there at 5,000. “There isn’t any moment that I was contemplating pursuing a job in any other field than the field of production agriculture,” she said emphatically.

Cannabis coffee pods are coming to Missouri — Greenway Magazine

August 3, 2022

Montana Economy

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This is the second partnership Missouri’s Own has formed with a non-cannabis company, following the recent launch of Twice Baked Red Hot. ripples with St. Louis-based chipmaker Old Vienna. Like the THC-infused chips, the cannabis-infused coffee pods are a first for Missouri.

“We couldn’t be more excited to partner with a local cannabis company dedicated to high-quality products,” Michelle said. Billonis, CEO of The Coffee Ethic. “We love that these products are sold at local dispensaries and boost our economy.”

ABOUT SHOW-ME ORGANICS

Show-me Organics, based in Springfield, Missouri, is committed to bringing world-class cannabis products to Missouri patients. A product-driven, patient-focused company, Show-Me Organics is the parent company of brands like Vivid, Blue Sage Cannabis Company, and Buoyant Bob. For more information, visit showmeorganics.com.

ABOUT VIVE

Long live combines the precision of modern science with traditional hash-making techniques, bringing products to Missouri that are at the forefront of cannabis innovation globally. Long live The wide range of products stems from the brand’s focus on different cannabis consumers and is based on the understanding that cannabis affects everyone differently. Learn more about vividcannabis.com.

ABOUT MISSOURI’S OWN

Missouri’s Own is an edibles brand from Vivid that launched in March. The brand celebrates Missouri’s vast botanical diversity with flavors inspired by locally grown fruits, such as papaya, raspberry, Concord grape and more. Missouri’s Own also celebrates the flavors of the state by partnering with locally loved brands to create cannabis-infused versions of iconic local foods.

ABOUT COFFEE ETHICS

The Coffee Ethic sources the highest quality coffees and is dedicated to the art and science of brewing. The mission is to serve everyone in the coffee community: growers, suppliers, vendors, customers, employees, our families and the community of Springfield. Founded in 2007, The Coffee Ethic aims to be a sustainable and enterprising company.

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Montana not in recession, economist says at Tuesday’s forum | New

August 2, 2022

Montana Loans

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Montana is not in a recession and is still enjoying strong job growth and wage gains above inflation, but things are slowing down significantly, said Patrick Barkey, chief economist at the Bureau of Business and Economics. Research.

Giving a mid-year economic update to Billings on Tuesday, Barkey noted that several things worked in Montana’s favor. The office is part of the University of Montana. Farm prices are up significantly from a year ago, rising revenues have resulted in an unprecedented $1.8 billion revenue surplus for the state government and pandemic-hit businesses are nearly fully reopened.

The challenge is persistent inflation that outlasts the state’s economic gains.

“We’re driving along the road, like we all are, and if you look in the rearview mirror, things just look dandy,” Barkey said. “When we look to the future, there are concerns. We are at a point where the economy is changing.

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Strong job growth, which was previously expected to extend through 2023, is now expected to decline significantly over the next three years. Consumer spending, positive in the short term, has moderated and is expected to decline further as the US Federal Reserve, attempting to cool the economy, continues to raise the interest rate at which banks lend to each other. The influence of these increases in lending rates is reflected upwards in the costs of mortgages, business loans and credit cards.

Barkey said his feeling is that the Federal Reserve’s lending rate increases to date have kept inflation down. Before previous recessions, lending rate increases were in step with the pace of inflation, but this time lending rates have been close to zero for years and only increased to 2.4 % after being unadjusted during the first quarters of inflation, which exceeded The Federal Reserve is trying to slow it down by making borrowing more expensive and therefore spending more substantial.

Simply put, there is plenty of room for the Federal Reserve to raise bank lending rates, which will not be popular.






Patrick Barkey of the University of Montana speaks about Montana’s economic recovery during the 2022 Mid-Year Economic Update hosted by the Bureau of Business and Economic Research at the DoubleTree in Billings on Tuesday morning.


AMY LYNN NELSON Billings Gazette


“We’re about to see an extraordinary year for Federal Reserve policy, because people won’t be happy, financial markets won’t be happy. If the Federal Reserve is really doomed to tame this increasingly entrenched inflation, which robs us all of our purchasing power, day after day, it won’t like it. There will be strong pressure to reverse due to weaker growth, which will shock a lot of people because we haven’t seen that lately. We’ve had tremendous growth, but I think we’re going to do better, Montana. Migration helps. I think housing markets are going to be stressed as a normal part of our supply chain.

As regulators try to cool spending on everything from wages to home purchases, other issues in the economy need to work themselves out. Last week, Ukraine exported wheat for the first time is an example of a supply problem improving in a way that should make grain more available and push prices down. Oil prices fall as expectations of increased demand decline to reflect recessionary spending patterns.

Barkey said wage growth has already slowed from the pace that led to a 35% year-over-year increase in income tax collections in 2020 and 2021. Another factor in the slowdown in income gains is the decline in federal stimulus payments seen in 2020 and 2021.

Has your crypto exchange gone bankrupt? The best money moves to make next, according to experts

August 2, 2022

Montana Lending

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Maneerate of Nattakorn / iStock.com

This crypto winter has been particularly harsh following the recent collapse of several crypto platforms which left investors frustrated as to how to recover their assets.

Find out: Will Crypto recover? Here’s what you need to know
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Crypto lending platforms Voyager Digital and Celsius promised eye-popping returns to their clients – until they both filed for bankruptcy in early July due to their exposure to the now infamous Three Arrows Capital, which has itself went bankrupt after the implosion of Terra LUNA and its stablecoin TerraUSD (UST).

Voyager makes loans, “usually in the form of a specific type of cryptocurrency, to counterparties in the cryptocurrency industry to facilitate liquidity or trade settlement and interest earned on company loans. are passed on to customers, who earn a ‘return’ on their cryptocurrency storage,” the company explained in the bankruptcy court filing.

Celsius, which had a similar pattern, said in its bankruptcy filing that “these Chapter 11 cases will provide debtors ‘respite’ to negotiate and implement a plan that will maximize the value of its business and generate recoveries. meaningful to our stakeholders as quickly as possible.”

According to the court filing, Celsius has a $1.2 billion deficit on its balance sheet and owes users $4.7 billion. The company says it has $167 million in cash, “which will provide sufficient liquidity to support certain operations during the restructuring process,” according to a statement announcing the Chapter 11 proceeding.

The collapse of Terra and the loss of over $50 billion in Luna and UST coin values ​​over a three-day period created a domino effect and immediate problems for many market participants, leading to the eventual “ cryptocalyse” and “many of these market participants have had to halt operations, limit withdrawals, or take out emergency rescue loans to survive,” according to Celsius’ bankruptcy filing.

And now, retail investors seem to have little to no options.

Is there a way to recover your loss?

Jeffrey Blockinger, general counsel for Web3 company Quadrata, told GOBankingRates that a user’s ability to recover assets will depend on asset segregation and the total amount of assets remaining on different companies’ balance sheets.

“It looks like most users will end up as creditors of the bankruptcy estate and will receive less than the amounts that have been deposited on the various platforms, if anything,” he said. “The process can take a long time. Generally, funds will be frozen until a count of all assets is completed and a user’s claim is deemed valid by the bankruptcy court.

“Celsius has previously warned that the funds could be unrecoverable and Voyager said some assets are held in FDIC-covered accounts. It remains to be seen what level of protection, if any, Voyager investors will receive through these accounts. If these platforms had insurance, users could recover some of their deposits, but the insurance is unlikely to cover all users’ total losses,” he continued.

Unfortunately for investors, on July 28, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) and the Federal Reserve Board took away all hope of recovering any money. In fact, the agencies issued a joint letter asking crypto brokerage firm Voyager Digital to stop telling clients that their investments were insured and demanded that the company remove any previous claims insinuating that clients who had invested with Voyager would receive FDIC insurance coverage for all funds. provided to, and owned by, Voyager.

“These representations are false and misleading. Based on the information gathered to date, it appears that these representations have likely been misleading and have been relied upon by customers who have placed their funds with Voyager and do not have immediate access to their funds,” according to the agencies.

How long could it take to recover even a little money?

Adding another layer of frustration, investors will need to be very patient as bankruptcy proceedings tend to be lengthy. Rahsan Boykin, general counsel for decentralized exchange Hashflow, told GOBankingRates that a typical bankruptcy proceeding can take three to four months, however, it would not be surprising if a proceeding of this size and visibility take a little longer.

Boykin added that there’s not much users can do to get their funds back at this time, as Voyager and Celsius view customers as “unsecured creditors” who will be the last to get their money back.

“Look at Mt. Gox as an example of what to expect. The exchange failed in 2014 and no one has been reimbursed yet,” he said. bankruptcy, but it seems unlikely to bring good news to customers.”

“Another aspect to watch is the role of strategic third-party players – we have seen FTX offer financial assistance to struggling companies in an effort to acquire assets at a discount,” he added.

He also shared that at this point, the best-case scenario for most users is probably only a partial refund and the ability to write off their tax losses in a few years.

Can these losses be used as tax deductions?

Jay Fraser, head of strategy at blockchain-enabled securities exchange BSTX, echoed the sentiment, telling GOBankingRates that what will most likely happen is that users will write off their holdings as bad debts. on their taxes, but they can only do that if it’s a total loss.

“With so much of the industry-wide collapse caused by Three Arrows’ defaults, the amount of money customers recover will depend on how much money can be recovered from Three Arrows,” a- he declared. “So far, that’s only been $40 million out of about $3 billion in loans. This experience, painful as it is, could be positive for the long-term adoption of crypto by institutional managers. With more guardrails and regulation that closely mirrors traditional finance, risk managers could enable greater exploration of crypto assets for institutional portfolios.

How should investors approach buying crypto in the future?

Although options are limited to recoup losses, experts recommend certain steps for investors before returning to crypto.

Hayden Hughes, CEO of crypto social trading platform Alpha Impact, told GOBankingRates that going back to crypto, consider dollar cost averaging, which is buying a fixed amount of investments each month.

“Use Twitter. Start following well-known crypto accounts. Unlike most other industries, in crypto news travels faster on Twitter,” he said. the subject of many rumors weeks before the suspension of withdrawals. Pay attention to traditional finance news: As of 2020, crypto has been highly correlated to the stock market. What’s bad for the stock market tends to be bad for crypto, and vice versa.

He also recommends finding an expert trader to follow, for example using a social trading platform, but remember to only take trading advice from someone whose background you know.

It is also crucial to watch the Fed, he said, because there is still a lot of uncertainty in traditional markets, due to the rapid increase in interest rates, which in turn would lead to a continued decline in stocks, crypto and other assets.

Learn: Are these cryptos the next Bitcoin or Ethereum?
See: What are Play-to-Earn games? Here are the 10 Best Crypto NFT Games of 2022

“Decide on your budget. Figure out how much of your salary should be spent on investments and what percentage crypto should take up in your overall portfolio,” he said. “And diversify with lower-risk investments. Crypto shouldn’t be your only investment. Consider ETFS, stocks, bonds and other assets.

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About the Author

Yael Bizouati-Kennedy is a full-time financial journalist and has written for several publications, including Dow Jones, The Financial Times Group, Bloomberg and Business Insider. She has also worked as a VP/Senior Content Writer for major New York-based financial firms, including New York Life and MSCI. Yael is now independent and most recently co-authored the book “Blockchain for Medical Research: Accelerating Trust in Healthcare”, with Dr. Sean Manion. (CRC Press, April 2020) She holds two master’s degrees, including one in journalism from New York University and one in Russian studies from Toulouse-Jean Jaurès University, France.

Montana Democrats embrace new party platform ahead of election

August 1, 2022

Montana Economy

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Montana Democrats gathered in their historic stronghold of Butte this weekend for the party’s 2022 Platform Convention, reaffirming support for positions critical to the party’s identity after a year of Republican control of the party. state that saw a rapid advance in conservative policies emerging from Helena.

Amendments to the Democrats’ platform were generally statements of principle. The party, for example, now explicitly supports the right to access abortion and contraception and declares that the planet is in a “state of climate emergency”.

But delegates endorsed several new policy goals, such as restoring the Judicial Appointments Commission, which was eliminated by Republicans last session; the creation of a commission to investigate human rights abuses at the state’s historic residential schools; and supporting support programs for workers “dislocated” through a transition away from fossil fuels, among others.

It was a relatively stable affair, especially compared to the GOP platform’s own convention a few weeks prior, and given the issues Democrats identified ahead of the November election: the loss of two Democratic seats between either legislative chamber could give Republicans a bicameral supermajority, allowing lawmakers to pass constitutional amendment ballots and other measures that require a two-thirds vote without Democratic votes.

There were no stump speeches from top candidates or party luminaries. Monica Tranel, the party’s candidate for Montana’s Western US House District and probably Montana Democrats’ best chance of electing one of their own to Congress this year, given the deep red hue of the state’s Eastern District , was absent. Faction fighting over personality or politics was minimal, or at least private, largely sidelined in favor of technical debates over syntax and semicolons.

“We are united this November,” State Party Executive Director Sheila Hogan said in a statement. “The recent Republican convention revealed internal strife and a radical agenda. This weekend, Democrats presented a very different vision for Montana.

The platform “is extremely important because these are our beliefs and our value statements,” Rep. Mary Ann Dunwell, D-Helena, told the Montana Free Press. “We refer to our values ​​statements when working on legislation. When I again introduce a viable payroll for the Montanans, like I did for four different sessions, it’s in our platform.

As with the GOP convention, language is added to the party platform the same way a bill is amended or passed in the Legislative Assembly. Delegates separate into policy-specific board committees — outdoor recreation, health care and housing, for example — and then present the committee-approved amendments to the full convention. (Democrats’ board committees were open to the press; their equivalents at the GOP convention were not.)

Unlike the GOP platform, which, given the party’s near total control over state government, has a real chance of influencing or even becoming state policy, the Democratic platform is primarily ambitious and a statement of opposition to the conservatism that has come to dominate the state. Politics.

Indeed, the majority party has dominated the debates, with several amendments passed in direct response to bills or Republican votes over the past year.

In addition to new language on abortion and an amendment calling for the reinstatement of the Judicial Appointments Commission, convention delegates also passed an amendment calling for legislation to improve health care for veterans. “suffering injuries from toxic exposure during their military service”. Senator Jon Tester, Montana’s only Democrat to hold state or federal office, was a key driver of federal legislation to achieve this. But the PACT Act, as it is known, stalled in the US Senate last week after 25 Republicans, including Montana Sen. Steve Daines, voted against the measure.

And the Dems adopted language supporting local control and the separation of government powers, the latter a response to a high-profile dispute between legislative Republicans and the judiciary last year, as well as an opposing amendment to the “ filling” of local boards — a response to recent political disputes that have consumed local health, school and library boards across the state.

Along the same lines, delegates voted for plank language against censorship in public schools and libraries. “I know there’s a few tips I’d love to wrap up, but I’m in favor of that language,” joked Art Noonan, a longtime Butte Democrat and former party executive director.

Dunwell was responsible for new language calling for a “just and equitable property tax system” that adequately funds government services while protecting “ordinary Montanans from unaffordable tax hikes”.

It’s one of the few areas where Republicans and Democrats in Montana share common ground, though their respective methods for enacting property tax relief differ. The tax board committee spent much of its energy working on the language of the amendment to emphasize that wealthy Montanese and vacation home owners should not receive relief proportionate to Montanese on fixed incomes. or weak — an effort to distinguish the Democratic board from, say, CI-121, the ballot initiative to cap property taxes backed by Republican state auditor Troy Downing, among others. This initiative was not voted on this year.

“It wouldn’t have been based on your income, so it would have affected everyone, even wealthy homeowners who can pay property tax on a half-million-dollar house,” Dunwell told MTFP. , referring to the CI-121.

The convention also approved language calling for increased investment in housing affordability without giving up on environmental or labor regulations.

Underlying several of the amendments was a broad statement of opposition to any partisan effort to repeal or replace the 1972 Montana Constitution, the state’s guiding document and benchmark for Democrats on issues ranging from abortion to access to public lands to judicial appointments. In particular, Republican efforts to restrict or ban abortion in the state would require the reversal of state Supreme Court precedent tying access to the procedure to the Constitution’s broad privacy protections.

“We are the most protected citizens in the United States thanks to our Constitution,” said Evan Barrett, a longtime Butte Democrat and former director of business development under Democratic Gov. Brian Schweitzer.

Hunting, Fishing, and Outdoor Recreation Committee delegates have frequently invoked the Constitution when approving language affirming support for Montana’s waterway access law. .

“I want to see fire. I want to see a fight.

Gallatin County Delegate Alex Newby

“You should ask yourself, do you support public hunting opportunities? Do you support public fishing opportunities? Do you support the outdoor economy and the jobs and businesses it supports? said Jayson O’Neill, a public lands activist and consultant for the Tranel campaign who introduced the language, referring to Republican efforts to boost private hunting. “If you do, you should side with the Democrats.”

One of the weekend’s most substantial debates over election strategy arose during the discussion of the outdoor recreation board.

“To me, it’s a problem that Democrats, if we play our cards right, can turn a lot of voters away from Republicans if we just go out and present the bare facts to the people of Montana,” said Alex Newby, a delegate of Gallatin County attending its first convention.

But Democrats, he argued, have taken support on the issue for granted and are not doing enough to send a direct message to conservative voters who might align themselves with the party on access to public lands.

“The assumption on the part of the Democrats that all types of hook and ball are on our side is not true,” said Art Noonan, who chaired the board committee. “It is divided on other issues – how they hunt, where they hunt, the issue of guns. This is a question where we have to say it again and again and again.

Access to public land isn’t the only issue on which Democrats risk ceding ground to Republicans, Newby later told the MTFP. Democrats, he said, have never campaigned in the conservative farming community where he grew up and struggle to connect their messages with the hearts of voters — a pressing concern given the party’s ambition to win at least one Republican-leaning seat in Congress, avoid a GOP legislative supermajority, and ultimately reclaim at least one seat of statewide power.

“I don’t know what the Montana Democrats are doing other than asking me for money,” he added. “I’m like, I don’t have any money and I don’t want to send you money because I don’t really see a lot of results. So stop praising you for the values ​​you stand for. I want to see some fire. I want to see a fight.

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Letter to the Editor: We must tackle the housing crisis | Letters to the Editor

July 31, 2022

Montana Mortgages

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We must work together to solve Montana’s housing crisis. Affordable housing is increasingly unavailable to the middle class, affecting both rural and urban communities and making it difficult for employers to hire workers, who struggle to find housing.

The reasons for this crisis are manifold: the housing stock has grown more slowly than the population growth of our state; low interest rates encourage second home buyers to compete with assets for homes; the success of companies like AirBNB limits the supply of residential accommodation; and the prevalence of “cash” offers are blocking those in need of mortgage financing. And now more: the loss of many basement apartments at Red Lodge due to flooding.

Governor Greg Gianforte has convened a task force to deal with this crisis, hoping for an answer by October. Yet his actions come after he vetoed House Bill 397, a bipartisan bill that would have provided developers with tax credits to support workforce housing. Hopefully he is now more open-minded to this well-recognized approach, which is supported by state Democrats. In contrast, the Republican Party platform does not even mention affordable housing as an issue.

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Republicans passed a bill in 2021 prohibiting municipalities from requiring developers to include affordable housing in their projects. Again, very harmful to the housing of the workforce.

As a candidate for the Montana House of Representatives, I see a role for the state government in the fight against middle-class housing. I will initiate and support all efforts to resolve this complex issue.

Governor and MDLI chief economist paint rosy economic picture for Montana

July 31, 2022

Montana Economy

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Montana’s economic future looks bright, according to Barb Wagner, chief economist at the Montana Department of Labor and Industry.

Wagner joined Gov. Greg Gianforte at the Montana Chamber of Commerce’s mid-year economic update luncheon in Kalispell to discuss the labor market on July 28. Both offered good news regarding the growth of the state’s economy.

“Last year we had incredible growth,” Wagner said. “In 2021, Montana’s GDP grew 6.7%, which puts us 7th in the nation for GDP growth. In 2021, we added 19,600 jobs at 3.8%. That’s three times faster than our normal growth rate. More jobs in Montana were added in 2021 than any other year we started tracking growth in 1976.”

Among other accomplishments, Gianforte set a goal of creating 10,000 jobs with salaries in excess of $50,000 a year.

“We beat the number by 30% and created 13,000 jobs,” he said.

In the first six months of 2021, 500 new apprentices were added along with 40 new registered apprentice employers.

“We more than doubled the number of apprenticeships in 2021 compared to 2019,” Gianforte said.

Electrician apprenticeship ratios were also changed from two journeyman to one apprentice to one journeyman to two apprentices, quadrupling the number of apprenticeship opportunities.

Gianforte said he is focusing on upgrading infrastructure, expanding broadband, reforming the tax code, removing unnecessary barriers to professional licensing, lowering taxes and strengthening public education systems. and university. To achieve this, it set aside $275 million for broadband expansion and $444 million for critical water and sewer infrastructure.

“We are working with lawmakers to reform, roll back and repeal unnecessary regulations that are a wet blanket for business and make responsible long-term investments in infrastructure because it’s important to grow business and bridge the digital divide” , said Gianforte.

According to Gianforte, Montana is ranked the number one state in which to start a new business.

“We have recovered 146% of the jobs lost since the start of the pandemic. But we still have work to do,” he said. “We will continue to work to make Montana a sanctuary of freedom and free enterprise so Montanans can prosper.”

When the pandemic hit the country, US GDP fell 3.4%. Montana, however, fell only 1.3% and although employment fell 10% during this period due to business closures, Wagner said the state recovered quickly.

“Within 12 months we were back to where we were before,” Wagner said.

Such rapid growth has, however, brought some challenges, including labor shortages and inflation.

“It’s tough on the labor market and the supply chain when the growth is so fast. Even though it’s great, there are negative things,” Wagner said.

In April, Montana’s unemployment rate hit a record low of 2.3% and remains at an all-time low of 2.6%, according to Gianforte. This low unemployment rate, however, means that there are more jobs available than people, which explains the labor shortage. Job openings have also been created by workers who have quit and moved on to potentially higher-paying positions, Wagner said.

“That’s not a bad thing,” she said. “It’s just a hard adjustment to follow.”

Regarding wage gains, Wagner said, “Montana has the 10th fastest growing state over the past year…and has grown 21% over the past two years.” While a quick wage gain can turn into inflation, as higher prices are potentially passed on to consumers, there are other factors to consider. Wagner pointed to federal efforts to mitigate economic shocks from the pandemic as a potential factor.

For example, a study by the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco showed that stimulus packages issued during the pandemic resulted in a 3% increase in the rate of inflation.

“Our stimulus packages were significantly larger than in other parts of the world. Right now inflation is 9% and we would be at 6% inflation if our stimulus packages had been the same size than those in other countries,” Wagner said.

Wagner analyzed age and industry trends in the state of Montana, concluding that “every industry has fully recovered and every age group has recovered its labor force participation rate. “.

“We actually have a higher GDP than if we didn’t have a pandemic,” she said.

Slow, steady growth is the ideal outcome for Montana’s economy, and Wagner believes a downturn is ahead.

“We have a really good cushion that we’ve developed over the last year,” she said. “If our economy slows down, I don’t worry about it. Our economy is getting to a pace where we can grow at a good pace, but not at the breakneck pace we were at before the year.

Rents rise as deep-pocketed investors buy mobile home parks

July 30, 2022

Montana Mortgages

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KANSAS CITY (AP) — As far back as anyone can remember, rent increases have rarely happened at Ridgeview Homes, a family-friendly mobile home park in upstate New York.

That changed in 2018 when business owners took over the 65-year-old park located in the middle of farmland and on the road to a fast food restaurant and grocery store about 30 miles northeast of Buffalo.

Residents, about half of whom are seniors or disabled on fixed incomes, bore the first two increases. They hoped the last owner, Cook Properties, would take care of bourbon-colored drinking water, sewage bubbling in their bathtubs and pothole-filled roads.

When that didn’t happen and a new lease with a 6% increase was imposed this year, they formed an association. About half of residents launched a rent strike in May, prompting Cook Properties to send out around 30 eviction notices.

“All they care about is raising the rent because they only care about the money,” said Jeremy Ward, 49, who gets by on just over $1,000 a month on disability benefits after his legs suffered nerve damage in a car accident.

He was recently fined $10 for using a leaf blower. “I am disabled,” he said. “You don’t do your job and I get a violation?”

The fate of Ridgeview residents is being played out nationwide as institutional investors, led by private equity firms and real estate investment trusts and sometimes funded by pension funds, rush to buy up parks of homes mobiles. Critics say mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are fueling the problem by backing a growing number of investor loans.

Shopping puts residents in a bind, as most mobile homes — despite their name — can’t be moved easily or cheaply. Landlords are forced to either accept unaffordable rent increases, spend thousands of dollars to move their home, or abandon it and lose tens of thousands of dollars they have invested.

“These industries, including the mobile home park manufacturing industry, continue to tout these parks, these mobile homes, as affordable housing. But it’s not affordable,” said Benjamin Bellus, Iowa’s assistant attorney general, who said complaints have “upped 100-fold” since out-of-state investors began buying up parks. few years ago.

“You put people in a trap and a trap, where they have no ability to defend themselves,” he added.

Buoyed by some of the strongest returns in real estate, investors have shaken up a once dormant sector that is home to more than 22 million mostly low-income Americans in 43,000 communities. Many aggressively promote parks as guaranteeing a steady return – repeatedly raising rents.

There’s also a growing industry, with how-to books, webinars and even a mobile home university, offering advice on attracting small investors.

“You went from an environment where you had a local owner or manager looking after things because they needed fixing, to where you had people looking at a cost-benefit analysis to figure out how to get the lowest penny,” Bellus said. . “You combine that with the idea that we can just keep raising the rent and these people can’t leave.”

George McCarthy, president and CEO of the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, a Cambridge, Mass.-based think tank, said parks containing about a fifth of the country’s mobile home land had been bought up by investors. institutions over the past eight years.

McCarthy singled out Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac for guaranteeing the loans as part of what the credit giants see as the expansion of affordable housing. Since 2014, the Lincoln Institute estimates that Freddie Mac alone has provided $9.6 billion in purchase funding for more than 950 communities in 44 states.

A Freddie Mac spokesperson countered that it purchased loans for less than 3% of mobile home communities nationwide, and about 60% of those were refinances.

Shortly after investors began buying up parks in 2015, complaints about double-digit rent increases followed.

In Iowa, Matt Chapman, a resident of a mobile home in a park purchased by Utah-based Havenpark Communities, said his rent and fees have nearly doubled since 2019. Legal Aid’s Alex Kornya of Iowa said another park purchased by Impact Communities saw rent and fees increase 87% between 2017 and 2020.

“A lot of people living in the park had fixed incomes, disabilities, social security and just weren’t going to be able to keep up,” said Kornya, who met about 300 angry mobile home owners in a mega-church. “It almost led to a political awakening.”

In Minnesota, purchases of parks by out-of-state buyers have increased from 46% in 2015 to 81% in 2021, with rent increases of up to 30%, according to All Parks Alliance For Change, an association of parks. ‘State.

US Senator Jon Tester of Montana, speaking at a Senate hearing this year, recalled tenants complaining about repeated rent increases at a Havenpark development in Great Falls. One resident, Cindy Newman, told The Associated Press that her monthly rent and fees rose from $117 to nearly $400 over a year and eight months, the increase of the previous 20 years. The company says the increase was $95 over a three-year period.

In addition to rent increases, residents have complained of being inundated with fees for everything from pets to maintenance and fines for crowding and speeding — all squeezed into leases that can exceed 50 pages.

Josh Weiss, a spokesperson for Havenpark, said the company must charge prevailing market rates when purchasing a park at the fair market price. That said, the company has decided since 2020 to limit its rent increases to $50 per month.

“We understand the anxiety that any rent increase exerts on residents, especially those on fixed incomes,” Weiss said. “While we try to minimize the impact, the financial realities do not change.”

The mobile home industry argues that communities are the most affordable housing option, noting that average rent increases in parks nationwide were just over 4% in 2021. improvement were about 11%. Significant investment is needed, they said, to make improvements to older parks and prevent them from being sold.

“You have people coming into space who are giving us all a bad name, but these are isolated examples and these practices are not common,” said Lesli Gooch, chief executive of the Manufactured Housing Institute, the association industry professional.

Both sides said the government could do more to help.

The industry wants Federal Housing Administration financing to be made available to residents, many of whom rely on high-interest loans to buy homes that cost an average of $81,900. They also want the US Department of Housing and Urban Development to allow the use of housing vouchers for mobile homes.

Resident advocates, including MHAction, want lawmakers to cap rent or require a reason for a raise or eviction — state legislation that succeeded in Delaware this year but failed in Iowa, Colorado and Montana.

They also want Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to stipulate in the loans they support that rents remain affordable. And they’re supporting residents buying their communities, which started in New Hampshire and has grown to nearly 300 parks in 20 states.

A spokesperson for Freddie Mac said it had created a new loan offering that encourages tenant protection and last year made them mandatory for all future transactions in the mobile home community.

In Ridgeview, it is unclear how the rent strike will be resolved.

Cook, which claims to be the largest operator of mobile home parks in New York and has the slogan “Exceptional Opportunities. Exceptional returns,” declined to comment. The company closed a $26 million private equity fund in 2021 that bought 12 parks in New York, but it was unclear if any of them were Ridgeview.

The residents, meanwhile, continue. Joyce Bayles, an 85-year-old resident, has started mowing her own lawn because crews only show up every month. Gerald Korb, a 78-year-old retiree, said he was still waiting for the company to move a utility pole and transformer that he said could fall on his house during a storm.

“I bought a place and now they’re forcing all of this on us,” said Korb, who stopped paying rent in protest. “They are absentee owners, that’s what they are.”

Nevada gets $401 million for rural internet

July 30, 2022

Montana Loans

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LAS VEGAS — The federal government is pledging $401 million in grants and loans to expand the reach and improve internet speeds for rural residents, tribes and businesses in remote areas in 11 states, from Alaska to Arkansas.
U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack told reporters on Wednesday, ahead of Thursday’s announcement, that farmers, shop owners, schoolchildren and people wanting telehealth medical exams will benefit from the ReConnect and Telecommunications programs. Infrastructure Loan and Loan Guarantee.
“Connectivity is critical to economic success in rural America,” Vilsack said in a statement tallying the number of people who could be helped at around 31,000 in states also including Nevada, Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico and North Dakota. and Texas.
The statement said the Department of Agriculture plans more spending on high-speed internet in the coming weeks as part of a $65 billion Biden administration plan to expand high-speed internet. affordable to all communities in the United States.
U.S. Senator Catherine Cortez Masto, D-Nevada, joined Vilsack and White House infrastructure coordinator Mitch Landrieu in highlighting the effect grants and loans are expected to have in Lovelock, which is home to fewer than 2,000 people, and the Lovelock Indian Colony.
“There’s a need for this connectivity on so many levels,” Cortez Masto said, “that it brings telehealth, telemedicine, e-learning, workforce development. A connection is so important to so many Nevadans.
Internet service provider Uprise LLC will receive more than $27 million to connect nearly 4,900 people, 130 businesses, 22 farms and seven public schools in Lovelock and surrounding Pershing County, officials said.
Cortez Masto, a Democrat seeking re-election in November, said federal funds would provide eligible Nevada residents with $30 a month off their internet bill and up to $100 for a computer.
Elsewhere, Midvale Telephone Co. will receive $10.6 million to bring high-speed fiber-optic internet to people, businesses and farms in four central Idaho counties – Elmore, Blaine, Custer and Boise – and of five southeastern Arizona counties: Gila, Graham, Pinal, Cochise, and Pima.
Arkansas Telephone Co. will receive $12 million to connect nearly 1,000 people, 10 businesses and 145 farms to high-speed Internet in Searcy and Van Buren counties with low-cost starter packages with voice and voice/ data.
Alaska Power & Telephone, Unicom Inc. and Cordova Telephone Cooperative together are expected to receive nearly $55.4 million to connect nearly 3,300 people, 118 businesses and seven schools in remote areas with a fiber optic network.
In New Mexico, Continental Divide Electric Cooperative and ENMP Telephone Cooperative are set to receive combined grants of $18 million to install affordable fiber networks, and Penasco Valley Telephone Cooperative will receive a loan of nearly $29 million to connect ” socially vulnerable communities” in Chaves, Eddy, Lincoln and Otero Counties.
Vilsack said the programs will especially help residents of what he called “persistently poor counties,” where he says most have broadband access but about one in three don’t have the networks to broadband required for telemedicine and distance learning.
He said the aim was “to do what is necessary to ensure that every rural resident, regardless of postcode, has access to reliable and affordable high-speed internet”.

Submarine Force Launches Inaugural Submarine Conference of the Americas > United States Navy > News-Stories

July 29, 2022

Montana Lending

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The inaugural SCOTA was hosted by Western Hemisphere Submarine Leaders (WHEM) from Allied and Partner nations operating submarines to showcase and address national submarine domain capabilities, interoperability challenges and underwater collaboration against strategic competitors in the WHEM.

Vice Admiral William Houston, Commander of the Submarine Forces, kicked off the multinational conference with a word of welcome to participants from Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Peru and the United States

“We are all at this conference together because our countries share the same values ​​of democracy,” Houston said. “Our submarine forces all offer unique capabilities and advantages and this conference will allow us all to take a new step in our partnerships while strengthening our ability to operate as a cohesive joint and combined force that can respond to emerging crises if necessary. “

Following Houston’s introduction, a video of Secretary of the Navy Carlos Del Toro was played for attendees thanking them for their time and cooperation while encouraging them to take advantage of the unique opportunity to build knowledge between building relationships between allies and partnerships.

“I want to thank all of the top leaders in the Western submarine domain who are participating in this important conference today,” Del Toro said. “I believe SCOTA will lay the foundation for a renewed sense of collaboration and threat awareness in the underwater realm, so I urge you to make the most of this gathering and continue to grow our security partnerships. vital.”

After two days of presentations and discussions, Rear Admiral Carlos Alfonso Saz Garcia, Commander of the Peruvian Navy Submarine Forces, left the conference with a deeper understanding of the challenges of interoperability and submarine collaboration. Navy Against Strategic Competitors in the Western Hemisphere (WHEM).

“For us, it is very important to participate in this type of gathering, which is the first Submarine Conference of the Americas, because it seeks to unify collaboration between all submarine forces in the Western Hemisphere,” said Saz Garcia. “We have a lot in common, we sail the same seas and have similar submarines. I sincerely believe that SCOTA will strengthen ongoing partnerships and provide a different submarine take on a common security issue across the Americas.

The conference included presentations from several subject matter experts on global threats in the undersea theater, Navy security, the future of combined warfare in the Western Hemisphere, and lessons in hemispheric security. Admiral Daryl Caudle, Commander of Fleet Force Command, was a subject matter expert, who spoke about the advantages and capabilities of participating nations versus potential adversaries.

“One of our major advantages collectively in this room is the capabilities and superiority of our marines in the underwater realm,” Caudle said. “Our competitors cannot replicate or match the advantages we hold in the underwater environment. We all need to have a thorough understanding of the strengths and capabilities of each of our navies, so that we can better integrate when the time comes.

The conference also included a tour of the Virginia-class fast-attack submarine USS Montana (SSN 794), allowing attendees to see the capabilities of the US Submarine Force in person while providing a chance to pose and share questions and ideas.

The Submarine Force carries out the mission of the Department of the Navy in and from the submarine realm. In addition to giving additional capability to naval forces, the submarine force, in particular, should take advantage of the special advantages that come with submarine concealment to enable operational, deterrent and combat effects that the navy and nation cannot. could not get otherwise.

The submarine force and supporting organizations constitute the main submarine arm of the navy. Submarines and their crews remain the tip of the underwater spear.

Montana adds 2,287 cases, six deaths

July 29, 2022

Montana Economy

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As of Friday morning, Montana confirmed 296,599 positive cases of COVID-19. Montana’s COVID-19 case tracking map shows 2,287 new confirmed cases. There are currently 2,654 active cases in the state.

According to the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, 1,518,837 doses of COVID-19 vaccine have been administered and 570,384 Montana residents are fully immunized.

In Missoula, 209,818 doses have been administered and 77,695 people are fully immunized. 64% of Missoula’s eligible population is fully immunized, which is the most tied in the state. You can find current case numbers from the City of Missoula Department of Health here.

The number of COVID-19-related deaths in the state rose from 3,467 on July 22, 2022 to 3,473 on July 29, 2022, according to state health officials.

Here are the updated case totals in Montana:

Case of Yellowstone County:
45,806 Total | 332 Newly Reported | 554 Active

Flathead County case:
31,296 Total | 246 Newly Reported | 184 Active

Gallatin County case:
38,035 Total | 246 Newly Reported | 378 Active

Case of Missoula County:
30,647 Total | 238 Newly Reported | 414 Active

Case of Lewis and Clark County:
19,726 Total | 194 Newly Reported | 88 Active

Cascade County Case:
26,962 Total | 172 Newly Reported | 242 Active

Hill County Case:
4,848 Total | 68 Newly Reported | 40 assets

Lake County case:
7,321 Total | 65 newly reported | 54 active

Case of Ravalli County:
7,591 Total | 56 Newly Reported | 74 Active

Blaine County case:
2,251 Total | 45 Newly Reported | 20 assets

Silver Bow County Case:
9,086 Total | 45 Newly Reported | 71 Active

Powell County case:
2,027 Total | 38 Newly Reported | 34 Active

Big Horn County Case:
5,158 Total | 34 Newly Reported | 39 Active

Park County case:
4,744 Total | 34 Newly Reported | 47 Active

Case of Custer County:
3,191 Total | 33 Newly Reported | 49 Active

Case of Rosebud County:
2,775 Total | 32 Newly Reported | 15 active

Lincoln County Case:
5,119 Total | 30 newly reported | 45 active

Case of Glacier County:
4,235 | 27 Newly Reported | 24 active

Madison County case:
2,070 | 27 Newly Reported | 30 assets

Case of Roosevelt County:
3,412 Total | 27 Newly Reported | 29 Active

Valley County case:
1,885 Total | 27 Newly Reported | 42 Active

Case of Deer Lodge County:
2,814 Total | 24 Newly Reported | 12 Active

Case of Dawson County:
2,493 Total | 23 Newly Reported | 26 Active

Jefferson County case:
2,849 Total | 21 Newly Reported | 25 active

Broadwater County case:
1,379 | 17 Newly Reported | 5 Active

Richland County case:
2,755 Total | 16 Newly Reported | 15 active

Carbon County case:
2,216 Total | 14 Newly Reported | 8 Active

Beaverhead County case:
2,290 | 12 Newly Reported | 21 Active

Pondera County Case:
1,302 | 11 Newly Reported | 17 Active

Sanders County Case:
2,264 Total | 11 Newly Reported | 12 Active

Case of Chouteau County:
1,085 | 10 Newly reported | 4 Active

Case of Musselshell County:
966 Total | 10 Newly reported | 14 Active

Case of Teton County:
1,398 Total | 10 Newly reported | 3 Active

Daniels County Case:
414 Total | 9 Newly Reported | 7 Active

Case of Fergus County:
2,621 Total | 8 Newly Reported | 16 Active

Toole County Case:
1,310 | 8 Newly Reported | 10 Active

Granite County Case:
596 Total | 7 Newly Reported | 6 Active

McCone County Case:
404 Full | 7 Newly Reported | 6 Active

Meagher County case:
488 Overall | 7 Newly Reported | 8 Active

Sheridan County case:
779 Total | 7 Newly Reported | 9 Active

Fallon County case:
706 Overall | 6 Newly Reported | 6 Active

Case of the mineral county:
1,215 | 6 Newly Reported | 4 Active

Case of Powder River County:
380 Overall | 5 Newly reported | 4 Active

Stillwater County case:
1,601 Total | 5 Newly reported | 5 Active

Case of Sweet Grass County:
829 Overall | 5 Newly reported | 5 Active

Liberty County case:
441 Overall | 4 Newly Reported | 3 Active

Case of the county of Wibaux:
210 Total | 3 Newly reported | 3 Active

Phillips County case:
1,091 Total | 2 Newly reported | 2 active

Carter County Case:
265 Overall | 1 Newly reported | 1 Active

Case of Judith Basin County:
245 Overall | 1 Newly reported | 2 active

Case of Prairie County:
274 Overall | 1 Newly reported | 3 Active

Garfield County case:
243 Overall | 0 Newly reported | 0 Active

Case of Golden Valley County:
154 Overall | 0 Newly reported | 1 Active

Petroleum County Case:
35 Overall | 0 Newly reported | 0 Active

Case of Treasure County:
139 Overall | 0 Newly reported | 0 Active

Case of Wheatland County:
406 Full | 0 Newly reported | 0 Active

Answers to 25 common questions about the COVID-19 vaccine

Vaccinations against COVID-19 began being administered in the United States on December 14, 2020. The rapid rollout came just over a year after the virus was first identified in November 2019. The impressive speed with which vaccines were developed also left a lot of people with a lot of questions. The questions range from practical – how will I get vaccinated? – to science – how do these vaccines even work?

Keep reading to find answers to 25 common questions about the COVID-19 vaccine.

See striking photos of the tourism industry during COVID-19

Diverse Ranch Quick Sale Large 92,447-acre ranch sold near Rawlins, Wyoming

July 28, 2022

Montana Loans

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North Platte River Ranch Map

The North Platte River Ranch is an attractive investment opportunity for a large scale, low overhead ranch with an excellent lease and tenant in place.

Mason Morse Ranch Company has sold a giant checkerboard block of land located in the Haystack Mountain Range along the North Platte River near Rawlins, Wyoming in Carbon County. The ranch was put up for sale on January 17, 2022 for $11,750,000. The ranch will be in good hands, purchased by a conservation-minded buyer who will continue farming operations on the ranch. James Rinehart and John Stratman, brokers and principal owners of Mason Morse Ranch were the listing agents. Dave Johnson with Hall and Hall represented the Buyer. The ranch closed on July 20, 2022.

North Platte River Ranch’s an extensive land base covered five miles of frontage on the North Platte River, including 700 acres of river bottom, of which about 300 acres were under irrigation producing a yield of 500 to 600 tons of alfalfa per year. The ranch is a well established cow and calf operation with additional opportunities to hunt big game species, deer, elk and antelope. The North Platte River is a source of irrigation and blue ribbon fishing.

In total, the contiguous ranch consists of approximately 25,000 deeded acres as well as 40,960 acres of BLM land, 2,960 acres of public school lease and 23,527 acres of private lease. Improvements included a veterinary calving barn, feedlot, working corrals, two houses, and several support buildings for ongoing livestock operations.

Rawlins, Wyoming is an arid and cool climate. Annual rainfall at the airport is nine inches. This increases at higher ranch elevations. The hottest month of the year is July with an average daily high temperature of 84°. The coldest month is January with a maximum average of 31° and a minimum of 13°. The humidity is quite low. Average annual snowfall is 52 inches. The elevation ranges from 6,400 feet at river level to 7,700 feet at the highest point on the property.

Created in 1868 by the Dakota legislature, the county’s name is derived from the vast coal deposits found in the area. Originally covering the full width of Wyoming Territory, Carbon County was reduced in size by the creation of Johnson County in 1875 and Natrona County in 1888. Historically, it was crossed by the Overland Trail , the Oregon Trail, the Mormon Trail, and both the original Union Pacific Railroad and Lincoln Highway routes. Interstate 80 is now the preferred trail for most travelers through the county, although several minor scenic routes and side roads provide pleasant alternatives.

The Checkerboard Lands are remnants of the early American West when the federal government gave railroad companies alternating sections of land. In 1803, the Louisiana Purchase doubled the size of the expanding United States, and much of what is now Wyoming became an official part of the country. Over the next 100 years, explorers, surveyors, mountaineers, pioneers, Pony Express riders, and farmers traversed the state in search of opportunity.

The Transcontinental Railroad, completed in 1869, left an indelible mark on southern Wyoming. It was funded in part by land grants to the railroad under the Union Pacific Act of 1862. Congress granted all other sections (one square mile) of land within 20 miles of the railroad. iron to Union Pacific, which tried to sell it to raise capital. for the company. The land could then be sold at a profit at a later date. This was impractical in the vast semi-arid rangelands of the West. Many sections in remote areas remained unsold and in government possession, leaving a permanent checkerboard pattern of alternating public and private land.

The North Platte River Ranch is an attractive investment opportunity for a large scale, low overhead ranch with an excellent lease and tenant in place. A combination of ranching and recreation opportunities along the waterfront North Platte River presented an excellent financial opportunity for an investor,” said James Rinehart, listing agent, Mason Morse Ranch Company.

APPROXIMATE AREA:

Deed: 25,000 ± acres

BLM: 40,960 ± acres

Private lease: 23,527 ± acres

State lease: 2,960 ± acres

Total: 92,447 ± acres

NORTH PLATTE RIVER RANCH LEASES AND PERMITS

The BLM permit authorizes approximately AUM 4,320 of grazing on BLM land and an additional AUM 5,000 on deeded land, private leases and state lands. The private lease, which covers approximately 23,527 acres, is from Aggie Grazing. Due to checkerboard ownership, permit holder BLM manages grazing on the Aggie Grazing lease. These lands were former UP Railroad lands. This lease is renewed annually but has been owned by the North Platte River Ranch for many years. The Wyoming State Land Lease comprises 2,960 acres and is intermittent across the property similar to a checkerboard. An additional 700 acres are fenced with the property and currently no lease is being paid for those acres.

OPERATIONS

The ranch is well known as a cow-calf operation, with an arid climate and natural protection allowing for open calving. Pairs are brought to the northern part of the ranch in early April and remain at the ranch until November. The cows overwinter in the southern part of the North Platte River Ranch. Supplementary feed requirements vary with winter conditions and hay is generally distributed from late December to late April. These requirements are generally 1 to 2 tons per head. Currently, the ranch is in the final year of a five-year lease with a strong tenant, producing a favorable return for the owner.

WILDLIFE AND RECREATION

Many big game species can be found on North Platte River Ranch and include antelope, deer, and elk. Antelopes are generally located throughout the ranch, but are concentrated in the central and western portions of the ranch due to terrain, vegetation, and climate. The rugged terrain of the Haystack Mountains and high ridges create excellent habitat for mule deer. Elk roam throughout the property, with a small resident herd. Transient populations can be found on North Platte River Ranch during fall and winter. The North Platte River runs through the property for five miles, providing aquatic opportunities such as fishing, wading, and rafting. Three and a half miles of river frontage provides a secluded atmosphere with no public roads or public access to the shore and only occasioned by some float traffic. Many species of fish can be found in the North Platte River and include brown trout, rainbow, cutthroat trout and walleye.

WATER RIGHTS

Livestock water is provided by electric and solar wells, numerous springs, 30 earthen reservoirs and the North Platte River. Water for the head office and feedlot is supplied by the Sinclair refinery at a very reasonable cost and is of high quality. Currently, livestock water meets the needs of the ranch while it is in operation.

MINERAL AND WIND RIGHTS

Oil, gas and coal mining rights are believed to be reserved by prior ownership. The region’s wind potential has attracted the attention of wind developers. Although having been approached for development rights by a number of companies, the property remains free of any leases or options. Wind rights will pass to buyer at closing.

About the Mason Morse Ranch Company

One of the leading providers of farmland, ranch and recreation brokerage services in the American West. Professional services include real estate brokerage, auctions and market analysis. With roots dating back to 1961 in the Roaring Fork Valley near Aspen, Colorado, The Ranch Company specializes in helping clients buy and sell high-value farms, ranches and recreational land and large area. Together, the agents of Mason & Morse Ranch Company offer their clients over 133 years of experience in the sale and acquisition of real estate land. http://www.ranchland.com 877-207-9700

About Listing Agent James Rinehart

An avid hunter eager to settle in Wyoming, James Rinehart obtained his real estate license in 1991. After more than 27 successful years in the ranch real estate brokerage business, an opportunity presented itself to merge resources with Mason & Morse Ranch Company. The changing dynamics of land brokerage and James’ commitment to providing his experience and effective marketing services to clients were key decision factors in selecting Mason & Morse Ranch Company as a partner. James’ satisfaction as a farm and ranch broker stems from his contribution to improving wildlife habitat and the great outdoors through the sale of quality hunting and fishing properties using conservation practices. Over the years, the opportunities to be involved in conservation ranch brokerage have increased. James has been involved in approximately 75,000 acres of conservation easement-related transactions for buyers and sellers, either through the sale of facilitated ranches, the establishment of post-sale easements, or the permanent securing of land.

James Rinehart

Email: [email protected]

The Web: http://www.ranchland.com/jamesrinehart

Phone: 1-307-459-0035

About Listing Agent John Stratman

Since 1959, John Stratman has lived and worked on ranches in Colorado, Montana and Arizona and owned and operated a ranch in eastern Colorado raising seed stock Red Angus and registered Quarter Horses. Professionally, John spent 18 years in the agricultural investment department of MetLife, where he held various positions from field representative to regional manager. In addition to providing agricultural real estate loans, investment activities included the purchase, management and marketing of large agricultural properties in several western states. During his corporate career, John lived in various western states where he learned about farming and property. Working as a professional real estate broker since 2001, John has bought and sold farms and ranches in many western states and maintains an extensive list of contacts with real estate professionals and landowners across the landscape. vast and varied of the west.

John Stratman

Email: [email protected]

The Web: http://www.ranchland.com/johnstratman

Phone: 1-303-536-7571

The “Cowboy code” guides the governors of the West

July 27, 2022

Montana Economy

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HEART OF NAFTA – The first meeting of the Western Governors Association in three years brought together eight heads of state guided by the “cowboy code”.

They finish what they started, said WGA executive director Jim Ogsbury. When something needs to be done, they do it. It’s not what they say, it’s what they do.

Citing the 1934 novel “Code of the West” by Zane Gray, Ogsbury spoke of “unwritten rules centered on hospitality, fair play, loyalty and respect for the land”.

“For an individual, the Governors who join us for the 2022 WGA Annual Meeting this week personify these principles and carry out their responsibilities in accordance with these ageless ethical principles,” Ogsbury said.

The three-day conference which opened at the Coeur d’Alene Resort on Tuesday saw some of the West’s most influential men sit down for talks and presentations on the challenges facing them and their constituents. , including economy, energy, health, cybersecurity, supply chain issues and drought.

“It will be a very productive meeting here in Coeur d’Alene,” Colorado Governor Jared Polis said at a press conference.

Wyoming Governor Mark Gordon said Yellowstone National Park, which recently suffered millions of dollars in historic flood damage, “is open, ready for business and going from strength to strength, and that’s thanks to the excellent neighborly relations that we maintain”.

“Western governors are focused on getting things done and tackling some of the most complex issues facing our country,” he said.

On day one, they heard from Tom Vilsack, Secretary of Agriculture, Javier Becerra, Secretary of Health and Human Services, and a five-person panel on the threat of wildfires and the best ways to prevent and fight them. forest fires.

The event hosted by Idaho Governor Brad Little also attracted Governors Doug Ducey (Arizona), David Ige (Hawaii), Greg Gianforte (Montana), Doug Burgum (North Dakota), Spencer Cox (Utah ) and Mark Gordon (Wyoming).

Little said their issues “are somewhat unique, but they’re also somewhat common.”

He said the interdependence of Western states is their “bread and butter”, creating effective partnerships and collaborations to address challenges such as land management, drought and invasive species.

“It’s the chemistry of all of us together and talking about what’s working and what’s not working, what we need to do better and how we need to plan for the future,” Little said.

He said states must leverage their resources to best utilize an aging workforce and address a shortage of affordable housing.

He pointed out that many western states are the fastest growing regions in the country.

“This community you’re in right now may be the fastest growing community in the United States, and we didn’t see it coming,” Little said. “It was a challenge for the state and then a challenge for the local community here. And we hope that some of the solutions to this incredible growth will be discussed here.

The annual meeting continues today with Denis McDonough, Secretary of Veterans Affairs, outlining how states and the federal government can work together to help veterans facing homelessness, mental and behavioral health issues and medical needs. of combat service.

There will also be panel discussions on protecting the supply chain and restoring burned landscapes.

Mountain. Public service urges judges to curb authority of tribal courts

July 26, 2022

Montana Mortgages

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By Andrew Westney (July 26, 2022, 7:15 p.m. EDT) – A Montana electric utility has urged the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn a Ninth Circuit ruling that the Crow Tribe Court may sue against the company for disconnecting a tribal member from electrical service, arguing that the situation did not meet an exception to the tribes’ general lack of civil authority over non-Indian entities.

A Ninth Circuit panel ruled in March that the Crow Tribe can subject Big Horn County Electric Cooperative Inc. to tribal regulations and that its court can hear claims under tribal law from senior tribal member Alden. Big Man, about cutting off his electricity during the winter. . The…

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Carroll and Gonzaga Team Up for Accelerated Law Degree | Education

July 25, 2022

Montana Loans

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MEGAN MICHELOTTI

Law school is tough, but it has become more accessible for Carroll College students who want to pursue a Juris Doctor.

A new initiative between the two private Catholic institutions Carroll College and Gonzaga University was announced Monday at a press conference held in Carroll under blue Montana skies. Carroll partners with the Gonzaga School of Law in Spokane, Washington to offer a 3+3 dual degree program as an accelerated path for students to earn their law degree.

“Carroll College and Gonzaga University attract a similarly ambitious and high-achieving student,” said Carroll College President John Cech. “Through this special partnership, we are creating a pathway for these motivated students to earn a highly valued law degree in less time and at a lower cost. We look forward to doing what we can to ease the financial burden facing students as they prepare to enter and add value to our regional workforce.

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Cech emphasized that the goal of the program is to create pathways and opportunities for Montana residents.

The idea first surfaced in the fall of 2021, when Gov. Greg Gianforte called Cech on a Monday night. The governor told Cech that government cannot function without lawyers and that Carroll has a unique opportunity as it is the only four-year college in the state capital.

The next day, Cech contacted Gonzaga president Thayne McCulloh. From there, the two institutions worked together to develop the 3+3 dual degree program which has now borne fruit.

“I just planted the seed and (Cech and McCulloh) ran with it,” Gianforte said.

Students can attend Carroll for three years and, at the end of their freshman year and upon successful application, enroll in Gonzaga Law School. Credits earned in their first year of law school will be transferred to complete undergraduate requirements, allowing students to complete their bachelor’s degree while studying law.

“I think (the 3+3 program with Gonzaga) is an exceptional opportunity. Many students went to law school from our (political science) department,” said Jeremy Johnson, director of political science at Carroll. “Over the past 10 years, everyone who has applied to our department at Carroll has entered law school, and Gonzaga is a popular regional law school.”






Carroll College President John Cech speaks at a Monday press conference announcing a partnership with the Gonzaga School of Law in Spokane, Wash., to offer a 3+3 dual degree program as a fast-track for college students. students graduate in law.


THOM BRIDGE, Independent Disc


The 3+3 program will allow Carroll students to complete both a bachelor’s degree and a JD in six years instead of the traditional seven-year cycle. This will save time and tuition costs while reducing student loans and increasing earning potential by joining the workforce sooner.

“We are very pleased to partner with Carroll College to provide students with an accelerated opportunity to earn both a Carroll undergraduate degree and a Gonzaga University law degree,” said McCulloh. “Gonzaga is proud of his many connections to Montana alumni, students and friends. We are grateful to our colleagues at Carroll College for this partnership and look forward to welcoming our first Carroll College cohort to campus in the fall of 2023.”

Carroll and Gonzaga are working to expand other aspects of this partnership, including the growth of Carroll’s pre-law program, the internship partnership and other collaborative efforts to be announced next year.

This is not Carroll’s first 3+3 dual degree program. In August 2019, Carroll announced its partnership with the University of Montana’s Alexander Blewett III School of Law, which was the first public-private partnership for the two institutions.

“I didn’t know (3+3 dual degree law programs) was a thing because my class at Carroll was first eligible. I found it on Carroll’s website my freshman year,’ said Rylie Weeks, a 2022 Carroll English graduate and a member of the Talking Saints (Carroll’s speech and debate team) who will be attending the dual-rights program. 3 + 3 degree from UM in the fall. “It was definitely more work because you have to complete your major and major requirements, but if you know you want to go to law school, then I would.”

The 3+3 Dual Degree program with Gonzaga will be available to newly admitted and qualified current Carroll students beginning in Fall 2022.

“Everyone wins when we provide students with the tools they need to succeed and thrive, which is why increasing educational opportunities is one of our primary goals,” Gianforte said. “Together with Dr. Cech, we are increasing access to legal internships in state government, giving students in the new Carroll College-Gonzaga University accelerated law degree program the opportunity to learn, train and start their career in Montana.”

Gianforte ended the press conference on a high note.

“Together, we’re looking for out-of-the-box solutions to help Montana residents thrive and reach their full potential. I am filled with optimism about what we can accomplish with this partnership,” said Gianforte. “Montana’s best days are ahead of us.”

Can you legally share how much you get paid with your colleagues?

July 25, 2022

Montana Lending

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Over the years, regardless of my job, I’ve always felt like it’s taboo to talk about how much you get paid. Whether it’s your family, friends, or colleagues, the feeling is that you’re not supposed to tell anyone about it. It’s meant to be kept as a deep, dark secret that only you know.

But why? Is there really an unspoken rule that says it’s rude to discuss your salary with someone? Can you really get in trouble for talking about salary? Or have we all been manipulated by companies and their bosses and managers into thinking that our salary is a forbidden topic of conversation?

Can you get in trouble and even get fired from your job if you talk about your salary?

Does your employer have the right to punish or fire you for discussing how much the company is paying you?

The answer? NOPE.

According to National Labor Relations Commission, workers in Indiana, Kentucky and Illinois are protected. The same is true for all workers in the country.

… When you and another employee have a conversation or communication about your salary, it is illegal for your employer to punish or retaliate against you in any way for having that conversation.

Sharing your salary can help you in the future and others

Sharktank’s most ruthless and demanding businessman even says that we should share our salary information.

In my opinion, I think we should be very open about the amount we receive. Many times when I was asked what I wanted to do, I had no idea. Was I going to ask too much and be ignored, or God forbid, too little and be stuck being paid far less than I should be?

Most of the time I ended up selling myself short and getting paid much less than everyone else doing the same job. If we were all more comfortable discussing how much we paid, I would have had an idea of ​​what other people were earning and reasonably asked for more money upfront.

It’s confusing, so that might help.

Although workers can legally discuss their wages with co-workers, eastcoastriskmanagement.com says this,

Although the NLRA prohibits employers from preventing discussions of wages and working conditions, the provision is vague and the practice is common. Last year, in a national survey conducted by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research, half of adults said discussions about pay were either prohibited or discouraged in their workplaces.

If you are an employer, get me the details of what you can and cannot do, legally, regarding your employees by discussing how much you pay them, benefits, bonuses, incentives, terms and conditions work, etc.,

“> HERE.

WATCH: Here are 25 ways to start saving money today

Whether it’s finding discounts or simple changes to your daily habits, these money-saving tips can come in handy whether you have a specific savings goal, want to save money, money for retirement or just want to earn a few pennies. It’s never too late to be more financially savvy. Read on to learn more about how you can start saving now. [From: 25 ways you could be saving money today]

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How the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 is hurting blue states

July 25, 2022

Montana Economy

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The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (TCJA) has been touted as a way to reduce the tax burden on the American people and increase the productivity of the American economy. At the heart of the TCJA was the cap on exemptions for the deduction of interest paid on real estate mortgages and the deduction of state income taxes from an individual’s federal income tax. The passage of the TCJA has hurt school funding for so-called blue states since blue states have traditionally had a higher tax rate to support their K1 through K12 school systems. The TCJA hasn’t hurt red states as much since many red states have Sovereign Wealth Wealth Funds (SWFs) that typically fund K1 through K12 school systems and therefore don’t need the additional income of an income tax of the state to fund their education systems.

The TCJA ignored the fact that not all investment income from SWFs is taxable income. The Republican Party designed the TCJA to restrict educational benefits in typically Democratic states, economically punish blue states for their economic choices, and reduce the ability of blue states to fund adequate education for their children. By maintaining tax-exempt status on the investment income of state sovereign wealth funds, the Republican Party has maintained the ability of predominantly Republican states to continue funding their children’s education, rather than promoting economic security. of the American people as a whole.

There are 21 sovereign wealth funds

At the level of the associated States of the Union

While there are 21 sovereign wealth funds at the level of the associated states of the Union, only 20 states have sovereign wealth funds, Texas having two funds.

The first sovereign wealth funds began with the Land Ordinance of 1785 and the Northwest Ordinance of 1787. The Ordinance of 1875 provided that the western lands were to be surveyed and divided into townships of seven square miles, then divided into 36 sections. For each township, the central lot, described as lot number 16 for each township, should be reserved for the maintenance of public schools in each township.

The Northwest Ordinance was a more formal mechanism by which states could seek entry as an associated state into the Union. Each territory applying for statehood should have an enabling law that would define the specific land grant for maintaining a public school system. These early attempts to set up a public school system did not provide for a legal trust fund, for the maintenance and investment of any income derived from these plots of land. The incoming states also had considerable leeway in deciding what to do with these specific land grants and how to manage them.

Many states immediately sold these plots of land to raise funds for the establishment of the public school system in the new state. It will be necessary to wait until 1835 for the territory of Michigan to establish the first permanent fund. Other states entering the Union followed Michigan’s example, but it was not until 1875 that the federal government specifically explained to territories entering the Union how they should use land for agricultural purposes. public education.

Severance tax funds began to appear in the 1930s when the state of New Mexico began using the concept of taxing the extraction of mineral wealth from state public lands. On March 1, 1937, the state of New Mexico began imposing a severance tax on mineral wealth extracted from state lands. In 2018, New Mexico had a valuation of $23 billion. 75% of the investment income from this fund is allocated to New Mexico’s education system, and the remaining 25% is used for other state obligations.

Many oil companies felt that the departure tax was unconstitutional and began a series of lawsuits. In 1981, the United States Supreme Court ruled in Commonwealth Edison v. Montana that the state of Montana had the right to impose such a tax on oil companies.

States that have a sovereign wealth fund for educational purposes and to offset costs to the state government are listed here:

State Main source of income Date of creation Valuation 10/21* Earnings*

Colorado Oil, coal and gas 1876 $1.321 billion $130 million

Alaska Oil 1976 $79.4 billion $16.1 billion

Alabama Oil and Gas 1985 $3.67 billion $900 million

Idaho Lumber Sales 1890 $3.16 billion $197.0 million

Louisiana Minerals 1986 $6.5 billion Unknown

Minnesota Land 1858 $1.5 billion Unknown

Mississippi Lumber, oil, gas, etc. 1817 $60 million $14.4 million

Montana Oil, Investment, XXXXXX $62 million NA

Pasture, agricultural 1889

Nebraska Ag leases 1867 NA$536 million

Nevada Land Sales, Unclaimed Estates, and Criminal Laws and Fines

XXXXXX XXXXXXXXXX 1917 $365 million $15.8 million

New Mexico Oil and Gas 1958 $34 billion $2.2 billion

North Dakota Oil and Gas 2011 $8.24 billion $564 million

Oklahoma Oil, gas and investments 1906 $1.8 billion Unknown

Oregon Investments 1859 $1.6 billion $149 million

South Dakota Oil, gas and leases 1889 $18.4 billion $2.7 billion

Texas SF Oil and Gas 1854 $58.5 billion $8.6 billion

Texas UF Oil and Gas 1876 $31.9 billion Unknown

Utah Oil and Gas 1896 $2.5 billion $82 million

Washington Wood 1894 $1.1 billion $101.5 million

Wisconsin Unclaimed and XXXXX XXXXXXXXX

Dormant property 1848 $31 million NA

Wyoming Oil and Gas 1974 $7.9 billion $301 million

(* Figures given in this article are based on the best information available to the public. Several of the SWFs are so opaque that it was impossible to provide income even after contacting the SWFs directly. ‘a sovereign wealth fund has not been found, the information used is taken from the article: North American Dream: The Rise of US and Canadian Sovereign Wealth by Dr. Paul Rose published on May 6, 2014 at Moritz College of Law in Ohio State University)

National sovereign wealth funds

And investment income is not taxable

For decades, the so-called red states have campaigned against allowing wealthier blue states to be able to deduct their income taxes and home interest payments from their federal income tax. With the passage of the TCJA, these deductions were removed and a single cap of $10,000 was imposed primarily on blue states. The TCJA did not take into consideration the tax-exempt status of sovereign wealth funds in the United States, nor the profits of sovereign wealth funds, thus making this wealth invisible to the federal government.

When the federal government decides to allocate funds to the associated states of the Union, the main factor in this decision-making is based on need.

ELEMENTS INCLUDED IN ALLOCATION FORMULAS

The elements included in the formulas vary widely among currently active programs. Most programs use one or more of the following:

A direct or indirect measure of need, such as the number of school-aged children living in poverty, the number of overcrowded housing units in an area, or the number of reported AIDS cases.

A measure of an area’s ability or capacity to meet need

state, local or private funds. Typical measures used are per capita income and total taxable resources.

A threshold, which requires a minimum level of need before an area is eligible for funds under the program. In some programs, thresholds are used to target resources to areas of greatest need.

A minimum amount to be received by each state or other jurisdiction.

A disclaimer, which limits decreases in amounts received by areas from one period (usually one fiscal year) to the next.

The inclusion of such particularities sometimes requires the use of relatively complicated iterative procedures to determine the allocation of a fixed total allocation to eligible jurisdictions.

Because the accumulated wealth of sovereign wealth funds is invisible to the federal government when it distributes tax revenues among the associated states, current tax policies punish high-tax states and reward high-tax states. weak. This means that the majority of redistributed federal tax goes from blue states to red states.

Republican states, through their actions in freeing up their sovereign wealth funds and income taxes, and at the same time accessing state treasuries that are needed to provide a good education to their people, are able to have their cake and eat it too.

HDFC Securities Says to BUY These 3 Stocks Next Week, Posts Strong Q1 Results

July 24, 2022

Montana Mortgages

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Following Q1FY23 results, brokerage firm HDFC Securities is bullish on shares of UltraTech Cement, Bandhan Bank and Mphasis. The brokerage has set a target price of INR 7,295 for UltraTech Cement, implying a potential upside of 13% from the current market price. The brokerage has set a target price of INR 396 for Bandhan Bank, indicating a potential upside of 38% from the current market price. And HDFC Securities has set a target price of INR 2,940 for Mphasis shares, representing a potential gain of 29% from the current price.

UltraTech Cement

The brokerage said that “UTCEM’s consolidated EBITDA in Q1FY23 came in around 10/15% ahead of ours/consensus numbers. Due to high fuel prices, UTCEM’s consolidated EBITDA/APAT in Q1FY23 fell 6/7% YoY (despite revenue growth of 28%).While EBITDA per unit fell 20% YoY, it rebounded 11% YoQ to reach a healthy level of INR 1,236/MT UTCEM has warned that its fuel cost has not yet peaked, it will add capacity of around 40 million metric tons during fiscal years 23-25E, increasing its gray capacity to 154 million metric tons by the end of FY25. It also plans to double its share of green power to 36% in FY25 from 18% currently.”

“The UTCEM-guided exit price on June 22 is down about 3-5% from Q1FY23 due to the onset of the monsoon. It expects its energy cost to continue to decline. quarter-to-quarter for 2-3 quarters UTCEM will spend ~INT 60 billion in Capex in FY23E, which also includes Phase 2 Capex. 16.7 million metric tons by the end of FY23 and approximately 23 million additional metric tons (North, Central, East and South by the end of FY23) 25e) Targets gray capacity of 154m MT by FY25 UTCEM is also aggressively expanding its green power capacities with a target of around 36% share by FY25 (Q1FY23 – 19%) We maintain our estimates for the 23/24 financial year as well as the target price of the stock,” said HDFC Securities.

“We are maintaining BUY on UltraTech (UTCEM) with an unchanged target price of INR 7,295 (16x Consolidated EBITDA Mar’24E). We continue to like the company for its strong growth, margin outlook and balance sheet management,” the brokerage said.

Bandhan Bank

HDFC Securities said in a note that “Despite a strong rebound in advances (+20% YoY), Bandhan reported a failure of around 14% due to soft NIMs (8%) and lower other income (-66% YoY) Incremental growth was driven by non-EEB business, in line with the bank’s strategy to drive portfolio diversification (FY25 targeted the group’s EEB share in the portfolio at 26%. Gross slippages were high (~5.4%), driven by the EEB portfolio due to Assam floods/restructuring, resulting in a QoQ increase of 79 bps in GNPA. We remain attentive to asset quality and the impact of a shift in portfolio composition on the bank’s stable return metrics We are reducing our FY23E /FY24E estimates to account for lower other income and higher credit costs Maintain BUY with price c revised ible of INR 396 (2.7x Mar-24 ABVPS).”

“The bank’s strategy of foraying into other retail and commercial banking businesses is on track. While we appreciate the need to diversify the loan portfolio for greater franchise stability, we believe this could set a new standard for steady-state performance metrics. We are monitoring redemption trends arising from the restructured portfolio to gain additional confidence in asset quality,” the brokerage added.

Mphase

“Mphasis (MPHL IN) reported lower online revenue and margin in the first quarter. Growth in direct international business (+2.4% T/T CC) was impacted by the weakness of the mortgage credit division. MPHL’s growth outlook remains strong, based on (1) healthy deal volume (USD 302m net new TCV in Q1FY23, up 18% YoY, ex-large deal of 250 million USD won in Q1FY22); (2) trending deal pipeline (up 6% quarter-on-quarter and 10% year-on-year); (3) a lower revenue contribution from the DXC business (

“We expect weakness in the (short-term) mortgage segment and weakness in DXC to have a combined impact of 250 basis points on FY23 growth. UK may have some impact, winning a cloud transformation contract over $60m TCV and onshore pricing is offset Operating margin levers include onshore pricing and improved utilization Maintain BUY with a TP of INR 2,940, valuing MPHL at 28x FY24E EPS, backed by the industry’s best large client mining engine, consistency in large contracts won and stable operating metrics,” the brokerage said.

“We factored in +14.3/13.1% revenue growth, based on direct business growth at +17.2/14.5% and DXC channel growth at -24. .1/-13.1% for FY23/24E respectively; Additionally, we considered an EBITM of 15.2/15.5% for FY23/24E, which translates to an EPS CAGR of 16% on FY22-24E,” HDFC Securities shared as a prospect for the stock.

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Inland Bank’s Relationship-Driven Financial Advisor Lending Program Supports Transition and Growth

July 24, 2022

Montana Loans

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Launched in 2018, the Inland Bank Financial Advisor Loan Program was created to help independent financial advisors grow their business and clientele through the acquisition of another financial advisor’s portfolio of business, through partner takeovers or debt refinancing.

The program serves financial advisors across the country, offering conventional loans at a significantly lower rate than the SBA 7(a) loan program along with flexible structures and favorable pricing and terms.

Program features and terms include no cash equity required from the buyer, competitive fixed interest rates and up to 10 years of amortization.

When the program started – and still today – there was a growing demand for financial advisor loans as the number of retired financial advisors increased. By listening to financial advisory clients and providing personalized solutions, Inland Bank has built a foundation of ongoing, long-term support to assist with funding as a financial advisor’s practice grows.

As many financial advisors decide to retire later in life, many choose to sell parts of their business in separate transactions. This allows the retiring advisor to remain active in a lesser capacity, while capitalizing on a segment of the business they have built.

These portfolios are often established after years of personal relationships. Therefore, selling the business to a new advisor is more than just a transaction. It creates a relationship between the advisors as well as with Inland Bank as the lender.

As a community bank, it is an added advantage to offer customers in this niche industry personalized service and support to help with the transition and growth of their business.

Since its inception, the Inland Bank Financial Advisor Loan Program has funded nearly $20 million in loans to financial advisors located in Alabama, Arizona, California, Colorado, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri , Montana, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Texas and Wisconsin.

For more information about the Financial Advisor Loan Program, contact Tiffany Tyson at [email protected] or (630) 908-6623.

Keystone Pipeline won’t make gas cheaper – The Journal

July 23, 2022

Montana Economy

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Ever since boycotts began blocking Russian petroleum products, social media has been teeming with memes attributing rising gas prices to “the cancellation of the Keystone pipeline.”

Example: “Oh! Ask a buddy.

Most criticism comes from people who recycle truthfulness. Former Vice President Mike Pence: “Gas prices have gone up nationwide because of this administration’s war on energy – the shutdown of the Keystone pipeline.” Republican Rep. Jim Jordan: “Biden shut down the Keystone pipeline.

Here’s what really happened: No one shut down, canceled, or closed the Keystone pipeline. It is fully operational and delivering 590,000 barrels of tar sands oil daily in Canada to US refineries.

What some pipeline proponents think is that the “Keystone Pipeline” is a 1,700 mile “shortcut” called Keystone XL or KXL. It would have traveled through Montana, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas and Oklahoma to the Gulf Coast of Texas, delivering 830,000 barrels of tar sands oil per day. Many residents of these states fought fiercely against the pipeline that ran through their territory.

Now, “Build the Keystone Pipeline” has become a social media mantra, as if the United States could decree it. Canadian company TC Energy, formerly TransCanada, officially ended the project after President Biden withdrew his permits.

Even if construction of the pipeline began tomorrow, KXL could not be operational in less than five years.

When President Trump reauthorized KXL in 2017, his own State Department indicated that he would not reduce gasoline prices. The price of oil is set by the world market and certainly not by American presidents.

Let’s not forget either that the extraction of gasoline from tar sands oil, the dirtiest oil on the planet, is much more polluting and energy-intensive than conventional refining. Some of the carbon content is burned off in a process that spews greenhouse gases and generates toxic waste called petroleum coke, which is dumped in the United States in heaps six stories high. Petroleum coke seeps into schools and homes even when the windows are closed.

Bitumen, essentially asphalt, continues to be surface mined from what were once Canada’s boreal forests in Alberta. Too thick to pipe, it is enriched with volatile liquid natural gas condensate and thus converted into a toxic oil sands cocktail called “dilbit”, short for diluted bitumen. The dilbit, sent through the existing Keystone pipeline, contains chloride salts, sulfur, abrasive minerals and acids, and must be pumped under high pressure. It’s a murder on pipes.

In addition to greenhouse gases and petroleum coke, oil sands waste includes lakes, rivers, fish, wildlife and humans. Between 1995 and 2006, as oil sands extraction accelerated, First Nations in Alberta experienced a sudden 30% increase in cancer rates.

KXL, if built, also threatened the largest aquifer in the world – the Ogallala. Parts of the aquifer are now depleted and a major dilbit spill could complete those parts.

In 2011, a pipeline representative named Shawn Howard assured me that driving a dilbit pipe into the Ogallala aquifer would be risk-free.

“Why,” he asked, “would we invest $13 billion in a pipeline and put a product in it that was going to destroy it like these activists trot out? It makes absolutely no business sense.

The existing Keystone pipeline has ruptured 22 times, including spills in 2017 and 2019 that polluted land and water with 404,000 gallons of dilbit. Business acumen, as the oil industry constantly reminds us, is an attribute more often desired than possessed.

Ted Williams is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a nonprofit dedicated to stimulating conversation about the West. He writes about fish, wildlife and the environment.

Head-to-head record: Eagle Bancorp Montana (NASDAQ:EBMT) vs. Renasant (NASDAQ:RNST)

July 23, 2022

Montana Lending

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Eagle Bancorp Montana (NASDAQ: EBMTGet a rating) and Renasant (NASDAQ:RNSTGet a rating) are both small cap finance companies, but which is the better company? We’ll compare the two companies based on their dividend strength, analyst recommendations, risk, valuation, profitability, institutional ownership and earnings.

Analyst Recommendations

This is a breakdown of the current ratings of Eagle Bancorp Montana and Renasant, as reported by MarketBeat.

Sales Ratings Hold odds Buy reviews Strong buy odds Rating
Eagle Bancorp Montana 0 1 0 0 2.00
Renasant 0 1 2 0 2.67

Eagle Bancorp Montana currently has a consensus target price of $22.00, indicating a potential upside of 12.76%. Renasant has a consensus target price of $34.63, indicating a potential upside of 12.09%. Given Eagle Bancorp Montana’s likely higher upside, stock analysts clearly believe that Eagle Bancorp Montana is more favorable than Renasant.

Volatility and risk

Eagle Bancorp Montana has a beta of 0.64, indicating its stock price is 36% less volatile than the S&P 500. By comparison, Renasant has a beta of 1.09, indicating its stock price is 9% more volatile than the S&P 500.

Dividends

Eagle Bancorp Montana pays an annual dividend of $0.50 per share and has a dividend yield of 2.6%. Renasant pays an annual dividend of $0.88 per share and has a dividend yield of 2.8%. Eagle Bancorp Montana pays 29.4% of its earnings as a dividend. Renasant distributes 32.7% of its profits as a dividend. Both companies have healthy payout ratios and should be able to cover their dividend payments with earnings over the next few years. Eagle Bancorp Montana has increased its dividend for 11 consecutive years.

Profitability

This table compares the net margins, return on equity and return on assets of Eagle Bancorp Montana and Renasant.

Net margins Return on equity return on assets
Eagle Bancorp Montana 12.04% 7.52% 0.80%
Renasant 23.66% 7.01% 0.93%

Insider and Institutional Ownership

46.9% of Eagle Bancorp Montana shares are held by institutional investors. Comparatively, 78.7% of Renasant shares are held by institutional investors. 7.4% of the shares of Eagle Bancorp Montana are held by insiders of the company. By comparison, 2.9% of Renasant shares are held by company insiders. Strong institutional ownership is an indication that endowments, large fund managers, and hedge funds believe a company will outperform the market over the long term.

Valuation and benefits

This chart compares gross revenue, earnings per share (EPS), and valuation of Eagle Bancorp Montana and Renasant.

Gross revenue Price/sales ratio Net revenue Earnings per share Price/earnings ratio
Eagle Bancorp Montana $97.52 million 1.34 $14.42 million $1.70 11:48
Renasant $695.67 million 2.48 $175.89 million $2.69 11:48

Renasant has higher revenues and profits than Eagle Bancorp Montana. Eagle Bancorp Montana trades at a lower price-to-earnings ratio than Renasant, indicating that it is currently the more affordable of the two stocks.

Summary

Renasant beats Eagle Bancorp Montana on 12 of the 17 factors compared between the two stocks.

About Eagle Bancorp Montana

(Get a rating)

Eagle Bancorp Montana, Inc. operates as a bank holding company for Opportunity Bank of Montana, which provides various retail banking products and services to small businesses and individuals in Montana. It accepts various deposit products, such as individual checking, savings, money market and retirement accounts, as well as certificates of deposit accounts. The Company also offers 1 to 4 family residential mortgages, such as residential mortgages and building residential properties; commercial real estate loans, including multi-family housing, non-residential property, commercial construction and development, and farmland loans; and second mortgage/home equity loans. In addition, it offers consumer loans, such as loans secured by collateral other than real estate, such as automobiles, recreational vehicles and boats; personal loans and lines of credit; commercial business loans consisting of secured and unsecured business loans and lines of credit; building loans; agricultural loans; and mortgage lending services. The company operates 23 full-service branches, 1 community banking office and 25 ATMs. Eagle Bancorp Montana, Inc. was founded in 1922 and is headquartered in Helena, Montana.

About Renasant

(Get a rating)

Renasant LogoRenasant Corporation operates as a bank holding company for Renasant Bank which provides a range of financial, wealth management, trust and insurance services to retail and commercial customers. It operates through three segments: community banks, insurance and wealth management. The community banking segment offers checking and savings accounts, business and personal loans, asset lending and equipment rental services, as well as safe deposit and night deposit services . It also grants commercial, financial and agricultural loans; financing and leasing of equipment; real estate-1-4 family mortgage; real estate-commercial mortgage; real estate construction loans for the construction of single-family residential properties, multi-family properties and commercial projects; personal installment loans; and interim construction loans, as well as automated teller machines (ATMs), online and mobile banking, call centers and cash management services. The Insurance segment provides insurance agency services, such as commercial and personal insurance products through insurance companies. The Wealth Management segment offers a range of wealth management and trust services, including the administration and management of trust accounts, such as personal and corporate benefit accounts, and custodial accounts, as well as accounting and fund management for trust accounts; annuities, mutual funds and other investment services through a third party broker; and qualified retirement plans, IRAs, employee benefit plans, personal trusts and estates. As of December 31, 2021, the company operated a network of 189 banking, credit and mortgage offices located in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee; 150 full-service branches and 11 limited-service branches; 173 ATMs; and 38 ATMs. Renasant Corporation was founded in 1904 and is headquartered in Tupelo, Mississippi.



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Author exposes Clarkdale’s ‘sinister’ history

July 22, 2022

Montana Mortgages

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Local author Peggy Hicks really loves her job.

While reading her latest book, “Bootleggers, Bottles & Badges: The More Sinister Side of the So-called “Model Town” of Clarkdale Arizona,” Hicks brought her stories to life using a trunk full of props : authentic antique bottles, newspaper clippings, a pistol and an old spittoon, which she literally threw from the stage, intentionally during her performance at Stardust Books on Saturday July 16th.

For about an hour, Hicks told stories — some true, some folk — about the history of Clarkdale and the colorful cast of characters who lived during the Prohibition era from around 1915 to 1930.

While wearing multiple hats, a veil, and even the classic disguise of nose and glasses, Hicks transformed, becoming the characters in the book, including town founder William A. Clark.

While wearing a top hat, Hicks exposed Clark’s more “sinister” side, including a “dishonest” campaign to become a senator in 1899.

“It has been reported that he bribed his constituents with $1,000 bills, spending over $430,000 to become a senator from Montana,” she said. “When Clark was confronted for his corruption, he said, ‘I never bought a man that wasn’t for sale. “”

According to senate.gov, “The Senate referred the matter to the Committee on Privileges and Elections, which promptly requested and received permission to conduct a full investigation into Clark’s election. On April 23, 1900, after hearing extensive testimony from 96 witnesses, the committee issued a report concluding unanimously that William Clark was not entitled to his seat. The testimony detailed a dazzling list of kickbacks ranging from $240 to $100,000. In a high-pressure, well-organized scheme coordinated by Clark’s son, Clark’s agents had paid mortgages, bought ranches, paid debts, funded banks, and blatantly presented envelopes of cash to lawmakers.

State legislatures elected senators before the 17th Amendment, had them directly elected by voters in 1913.

Although he resigned before the Senate committee could reject him from his seat, Clark eventually became a senator anyway, after the acting governor of Montana nominated him to fill a vacant seat.

The following year he was elected to the Senate by “a newly elected Montana legislature – in which most of the winning candidates had received financial support from [Clark].”

“Clark was a dealer, a miner, and a millionaire at the age of 30,” Hicks said. “In 1910 he began to purchase property at the base of Mingus Mountain, where he would build a foundry. Then he built a railroad along the Verde River, where he used the train to transport copper to market.

Hicks told stories of the city’s booming business and the growth fueled by the mines, which emitted smoke and toxic fumes and killed vegetation in surrounding areas.

Hicks said that while most mining towns of the day grew haphazardly out of control, Clark’s vision for the town of Clarkdale was different, and it became Arizona’s first masterplan town.

Hicks’ interest in history led her to write a total of four books, including “Bootleggers.” His other three books include “Ghost Town Stories and Wicked Legends, Are Ghosts Real?” “The Story of Belgian Jennie: The Richest Woman in Arizona Territory” and “The Ghost of Cuban Queen Bordello: The Story of a 1920s Woman Jerome”.

After operating his retail store in Jerome for 25 years, Hicks moved to Clarkdale.

“I lived in Clarkdale for 30 years,” she said. “Clarkdale was supposed to be the model town so I didn’t think there would be much history, until I started looking in the archives and doing some research, and after finding antique bottles of drugs, alcohol and more, I started wondering what they were used for and who sold them and it all kind of came together.

Hicks’ bottle collection includes old liquor and milk bottles, “snake oil” drugs and others, which she says she acquired from various junkyards around town.

“I’ve been digging for bottles for years,” she says. “I used to live in Colorado and go to Telluride and stuff like that. To me, it’s amazing how they worked; they used molds, the first bottles were blown glass.

Throughout his reading, Hicks used the bottles as props to tell stories of old pharmacies, bootlegging operations and more.

“I’ve always loved history,” she says. “My grandmother was a storyteller and I learned to love [storytelling] of her.”

Hicks said she sells her books locally, at Jerome and the Verde Canyon Railroad in Clarkdale, but most of her sales are online through Amazon, where she has self-published her works.

Fintech Legal Report – July 2022 | Coie Perkins

July 22, 2022

Montana Lending

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[co-author: Dania Assas]

Weekly Fintech focus

  • The CFPB is terminating a no-action letter with an AI credit underwriter.
  • A CFPB circular confirms that IA’s underwriting models are subject to anti-discrimination laws, including adverse action notices.
  • BNPL companies and credit bureaus are urged by the CFPB to properly report consumer information.
  • The CFPB is launching an initiative to improve customer service at major banks.

CFPB Terminates AI Credit Underwriting No Action Letter

On June 8, 2022, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) issued a order ending a No Action Letter (NAL) that the CFPB originally granted to lending platform Upstart Network, Inc. (Upstart), in 2017 (CFPB’s first-ever NAL) and subsequently renewed in November 2020 for a period of three years.

Under the CFPB’s NAL policy, a person may seek treatment without action on a new product or service that offers the potential for significant consumer benefits where there is uncertainty as to how the CFPB would apply provisions specific to the law. Granting treatment without action means that the CFPB does not currently intend to take supervisory or enforcement action against the recipient with respect to the subject matter of the NAL.

The CFPB’s termination of Upstart NAL is the latest in a series of CFPB actions that have raised questions about the future of its NAL policy. The following timeline briefly summarizes these events:

  • In 2017, Upstart requested an NAL from the CFPB to clarify that Upstart’s credit underwriting model, which involved proprietary applications of artificial intelligence and machine learning to complement traditional credit scoring methodologies, did not present a violation of the Equal Credit Opportunity Act (ECOA) and Regulation B. The CFPB granted Upstart’s request, making Upstart the first entity to receive no-action treatment under the new policy NAL of the CFPB.
  • On November 30, 2020, the CFPB renewed NAL from Upstart for another three years. The NAL terms and conditions required Upstart to notify the CFPB of material changes to Upstart’s model.
  • On April 13, 2022, Upstart notified the CFPB of its intention to add new variables to its underwriting and pricing model. According to the CFPB’s June 8 termination order, CFPB staff requested more time to review Upstart’s proposal.
  • On May 24, 2022, the CFPB announcement that it was replacing its Office of Innovation (which handled NAL applications) and its Project Catalyst (another initiative to encourage innovation) with a new Office of Competition and Innovation. The CFPB press release states that “[a]fter a review of these programs, the agency concludes that the initiatives have proven ineffective and that some firms participating in these programs have made public statements that the Bureau has provided them with benefits that the Bureau has not expressly granted.
  • On May 27, 2022, per the CFPB Termination Order, Upstart asked the CFPB to amend the NAL to reduce its term from 36 months to 18 months, meaning it would end three days later on May 30, 2022 .
  • On June 8, 2022, the CFPB announcement that he issued the order to terminate Upstart’s listing on his list of approved NALs.

CFPB Circular Confirms Anti-Discrimination Laws Apply to Algorithms

The CFPB published a circular confirming that federal anti-discrimination law requires explanations of the specific reasons for denying credit applications or taking other adverse action against applicants. The circular warns companies using algorithmic decision engines (or AI engines) that a “black box model” for loan decisions does not exempt the company from explaining adverse actions to applicants as required. the law. The agency warns that with some black box models, users and developers may not be able to know the reasoning behind the model’s results, which could prevent companies from meeting adverse action notification requirements. of ECOA. ECOA and Regulation B require a creditor to provide notice when taking adverse action against a plaintiff, explaining with specific and specific reasons why the creditor took such action. If the creditor uses technology that does not allow them to explain their decision-making process, then the creditor will not be able to comply with the law. In short, complexity, opacity, or time in the market will not be considered excuses for failure to meet a creditor’s notice of adverse action requirements.

BNPL companies invited by the CFPB to declare their credit data

On June 15, 2022, the CFPB published a blog post followed by his request (which we talked about here) into “buy now, pay later” (BNPL) companies. In the message, the agency urges BNPL companies to report positive and negative data to credit bureaus when BNPL payments are provided. In addition, the CFPB encourages the BNPL industry to develop standardized BNPL furnishing codes and formats to provide data that matches BNPL’s unique product offering. Although the major credit bureaus have announced their intention to accept BNPL data, the CFPB is concerned that differences between credit bureau plans could lead to inconsistent treatment of this data, meaning that the provision of this data will benefit consumers less. The CFPB will monitor the BNPL industry’s progress as the consumer credit data reporting changes are implemented.

CFPB launches initiative to improve customer service in major banks

CFPB Director Rohit Chopra led a town hall on June 14, 2022 in Great Falls, Montana to discuss the agency’s new initiative. The CFPB is seeking feedback from consumers on their relationship with their banks, including how they assert their rights to better service with major banks and credit institutions. The town hall included local community organizations, advocates, leaders and members of the public. Together, the group discussed the challenges faced by people in rural Montana and how banking deserts negatively affect Montana’s financial landscape.

Chopra noted that recent banking consolidation has had mixed results for consumers and customer service experiences, especially in rural communities. Rural customers faced reduced access to banking services as they were more likely to go to smaller banks or credit unions, but now live in rural banking deserts with no intimate banking relationship.

Additionally, many financial institutions and tech companies are turning to what Chopra calls “algorithmic banking,” which relies on using large amounts of data about an individual through tracking and surveillance to make predictions. on his behavior and banking habits. Chopra concedes that moving away from traditional banking relationships could eliminate discrimination based on human judgment, but warns that automated technologies are also a problem, as algorithmic biases can unfairly affect results.

To revitalize relationship banking, the CFPB has launched a Request for Information to find out how everyone can assert their right to better customer service with their depository institution. “Big bank customers shouldn’t have to go through an obstacle course to get a clear answer on their account,” Director Chopra said at the town hall meeting. In particular, the CFPB seeks to understand, among other things, (i) the types of information people request from their bank and how they use that information; (ii) what information is not currently available to consumers from their banks; and (iii) any customer service impediments that impede a consumer’s ability to bank (for example, wait times, disconnected calls, or the quality of answers to questions).

The CFPB also seeks to ensure that the algorithmic bank does not receive preferential treatment and must follow the same laws as traditional banks. The CFPB issued a policy in March confirming that financial firms must explain to applicants the specific reasons for denying a credit application or taking other adverse action. He also ordered several Big Tech companies, such as Facebook, Apple and Google, to provide the CFPB with information about their efforts to better monitor payment systems and how they plan to use customer data to power their algorithms.

[View source.]

Workers in red states are quitting their jobs at higher rates and why that may be a good sign

July 21, 2022

Montana Economy

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Employees in Republican states have a higher quit rate than those governed by Democrats, potentially indicating a safer work environment in red states.

Of the top 10 states with the highest quit rates over the past 12 months, eight are Republicans, according to data from WalletHub. This includes Alaska with a 12-month quit rate of 4.18%, followed by Kentucky with 3.74%, Montana with 3.69%, Wyoming with 3.66%, Mississippi with 3.53 %, Idaho with 3.48%, South Carolina with 3.48% and Indiana with 3.42 percent.

The only two Democratic states in the top 10 were Georgia and Arizona in second and tenth place, with 12-month quit rates of 3.86% and 3.37%, respectively.

Employee quit rates tend to be higher when workers are confident of finding another job, which requires a robust economy.

“Higher quit rates are a sign of worker confidence,” Julia Pollak, chief economist at jobs site Zip Recruiter, told MarketPlace in a recent interview.

“When there are more jobs, you’re more likely to pop in and apply for a new one,” she added, according to the outlet.

In a July 5 article, The Wall Street Journal reported that the COVID-19 pandemic “changed the geography” of the US economy as red states recovered economically faster than blue states. Workers moved from the coasts to the central United States and Florida.

The share of jobs in Republican states has increased by more than half a percentage point since February 2020, according to analysis conducted by the Brookings Institution. In May 2022, red states added 341,000 jobs, while blue states lost 1.3 million jobs.

The COVID-19 pandemic has triggered a change in the structure of employment, as more and more companies have opted for remote work. This has allowed many employees to move to red states that have cheaper housing, lower taxes, and less traffic.

Business friendliness

Red states are comparatively more conducive to a business environment, according to CNBC’s 2022 “America’s Top States for Business” ranking. The ranking takes into account 88 metrics spread over 10 major categories. Republican states in the Great Plains and Rocky Mountains regions are dominated in the “business friendliness” category.

Leading the category was North Dakota, followed by Wyoming, Idaho and Montana in second, third and fifth place. They are all Republican states. Arizona, which placed fourth, was the only blue state in the top five.

“Companies are following the path of least resistance,” CNBC analysts said of the business friendliness metric. “This includes a legal and regulatory framework that does not overburden businesses.”

Regarding the overall employment situation across the country, Colin Corbett, an assistant professor of economics at Bradley University, told WalletHub that young workers have re-entered the labor market at levels almost pre- pandemic.

“Older workers who have retired are unlikely to re-enter the workforce unless there is a dramatic change in economic conditions and the willingness of employers to hire them,” Corbett said.

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Naveen Athrappully is a reporter who covers world affairs and events at The Epoch Times.

The next generation of NIMBY

July 20, 2022

Montana Mortgages

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This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas and recommends the best in culture. Register here.

The pandemic has enabled many Millennials to buy their first home. Could it also have paved the way for a new breed of NIMBY?

But first, here are three new stories from Atlantic.


fight in the yard

When we think of the typical NIMBY – a derogatory term (short for “Not in my backyard”) for someone who opposes change in their community, especially if they don’t oppose change elsewhere – we have tend to imagine a Boomer-class, waving his fist skyward as someone builds affordable housing or a new wind turbine in his neighborhood. Research backs it up: The types of people who show up at local meetings to oppose new housing are older, more likely to be white, and more likely to be homeowners than those who don’t.

But the pandemic has not only spawned variants of the coronavirus. It may also have accelerated the development of a new variant of the change-averse owner: the Millennial NIMBY.

Over the past two years, house prices have soared as the country’s longstanding housing supply shortfall has turned into demand fueled by low interest rates and increased labor from a distance. As a result, the median selling price of a home in the United States has risen from $313,000 at the start of 2019 to $428,700 at the start of 2022.

New research from Freddie Mac shows that first-time home buyers were “the main driver of increased demand. In 2021, Freddie Mac funded 554,000 loans for first-time buyers, up 22% from 2020,” writes chief economist Sam Khater. “This is the highest level since tracking began in 1994.(emphasis mine).

Becoming an owner does not automatically make you a NIMBY. In fact, the people who attend zoning board meetings to try to block new construction, or who hire lawyers to try to prevent the construction of renewable energy or public transit projects, are very bizarre and represent a very small percentage of people who own homes.

So why am I worried about these new owners? Because I believe many of them will soon be desperate to maintain their property value – a key ingredient of NIMBYism. (If you’re wondering why NIMBY-ism is bad, you can read my longer musings here. But it plays a big role in our critical housing shortage, our failure to build public transportation, and the floundering of renewable energy. projects such as wind and solar farms.)

The economist William Fischel’s book The local voter hypothesis details how homeowners become “voters” and act to avoid potential declines in the value of their property. Importantly, these local voters are becoming extremely risk averse. Even though the new condos down the street probably aren’t going to hurt your home’s value, why take the risk?

Millennials took longer than previous generations to buy their first home, largely because of the Great Recession. But low interest rates in the early 2020s made mortgage payments affordable for many, even as house prices soared. In their fever to take advantage of low rates, many of these new homeowners put everything on the line: Redfin found that “potential buyers who bid all the money were more than four times more likely to win a bidding war than those who did. not in 2021. They also found that waiving pre-inspection improved the odds of a competitive bid being successful by 25%. Another report says a record share of homebuyers bought their homes without seeing them.

So now a large number of Americans have not only invested a large portion of their savings in new homes, but are also more likely to encounter costly problems with these new homes, given the frenzy with which they bought them. . Unlike their older counterparts, who likely have more diversified savings portfolios, these younger homeowners have tied up their money in their homes. While all homeowners care about the value of their property, it stands to reason that people who have purchased homes with potential resale value issues – or who have no other savings to fall back on in case medical or financial emergency – will be all the more concerned about any potential decline in value.

It’s one of the first steps on the path to becoming a NIMBY: feeling like your entire financial future hinges on the value of a single asset, an asset whose value you have very little control over. Home values ​​depend on many variables, including local crime rates, the quality of local public schools, the weather, and the ineffable feeling that a neighborhood is “cool.” It’s a frightening position to find oneself in, especially in a country that leaves its elderly, sick and poor without an adequate social safety net.

It’s possible that young owners are less prone to NIMBY-ism than their ancestors. After all, they are more liberal and likely to accept new neighbors, and they are also less likely to have anti-tenant sensitivities, given that they have spent more of their lives as tenants themselves. themselves. But I’m worried – when personal finances collide with political ideals, guessing who the winner will be isn’t hard.

Related:


Today’s News

  1. The European Commission has proposed a natural gas rationing plan, hoping to avert a winter energy crisis if Russia cuts its gas exports.
  2. A Georgia judge has ordered Rudy Giuliani to testify in a criminal investigation into election interference.
  3. South Carolina disbarred attorney Alex Murdaugh has pleaded not guilty to murdering his wife and son.

Dispatches


Evening reading
Max Guter

By Alexis Madrigal

(A 2018 story from the Atlantic archive)

ChuChu TV, the company responsible for some of the most viewed toddler content on YouTube, has a cute enough origin story. Vinoth Chandar, the CEO, had always played on YouTube, making Hindu devotions and short videos of his father, a well-known Indian music producer. But after he and his wife had a baby girl, whom they nicknamed “Chu Chu”, he realized he had a new audience – of just one.

Read the article completely.


More Atlantic


cultural break

Daniel Kaluuya as OJ Haywood in
Universal images

Lily. A poem for Wednesday, “Portrait of the artist with the family dog”.

Look. Jordan Peele Nope is spectacular, indulgent and brutal. You won’t be able to look away.

Play our daily crosswords.


Republicans have already unleashed a firestorm over how companies eager to help their employees have abortions are actually exploiting them to keep working. But the advocacy of American companies on the issue is not so simple. Today, The New Republic published an article reporting that CVS, the nation’s largest pharmacy chain, is running its local branches in states including Alabama, Arkansas, Idaho, Montana, Oklahoma and Texas to ensure that a prescription filled with misoprostol or methotrexate is not going to be used to induce an abortion. Some drugs, like methotrexate, that can be used to end a pregnancy are also used to treat diseases (like lupus). It seems clear to me that fear of liability is going to make companies extremely risk averse when it comes to helping women seeking needed reproductive care, especially as many states consider giving their residents the ability to sue anyone who helps a woman obtain an abortion.

— Jerusalem

Isabel Fattal contributed to this newsletter.

No food, no fuel and no jobs: the economic disaster engulfing Sri Lanka

July 20, 2022

Montana Lending

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Before the collapse of the Sri Lankan economy, Nazir, 50, spent scorching days hauling carts full of rolls of cloth, piles of coconuts and sacks of garlic through the narrow streets of the market in Pettah to Colombo.

Now dressed in a black cap, T-shirt and gray pants, Nazir sits idly in front of dozens of empty carts, listening to speeches on his mobile phone. He turns up the volume and points to the screen: “Aragalaya!referring to the popular uprising in Sri Lanka that overthrew its president last week.

On a good day, Nazir earned the equivalent of $8, just enough to feed his family of six, of which he is the breadwinner. “Now the business is dead,” he said. If he’s out of work today, he’ll go home with less than a dollar in his pocket.

Sri Lanka’s economic collapse has been blamed on former President Gotabaya Rajapaksa, who flew to Singapore after initially fleeing the country on a military plane to the Maldives as a wave of protests rocked the island nation.

Protesters were furious with the president for borrowing heavily to build China-backed projects and his eccentric policies, which included a ban on fertilizer imports.

Erratic economic management has been compounded by a drop in tourism revenue due to the coronavirus pandemic and the war in Ukraine, which has failed Sri Lanka and sent its currency plummeting.

Sri Lanka, which has run out of foreign currency, has experienced severe fuel shortages, leading to mile-long queues for petrol © Arun Sankar/AFP/Getty Images

Sri Lanka’s debt stands at $51 billion, just over half of which is owed to bilateral and multilateral lenders, including China.

The economic fallout has had devastating consequences. “My family is skipping meals,” Nazir said. “At dinner, we share pieces of bread with coconut sambal. I use firewood for cooking because there is no fuel or kerosene.

Stories like Nazir’s reverberate through the Pettah Market, which was once a teeming maze of clothing shops and stalls selling everything from the latest electronics and washing up liquid to spices and coffee.

But the half-empty streets surrounding the country’s most important market, located directly behind the port of Colombo, are an indication of a failing Sri Lanka, which has been battered by soaring prices, rising unemployment, poverty and hunger.

With foreign currency reserves depleted, the nation of 22 million has run out of money to import fuel, leading to mile-long queues at gas stations. The fuel shortage has effectively driven many people out of work and forced schools, offices and businesses across the country to close.

On the other side of the market, MT Niyas, 55, drinks his second coffee of the day at the Lucky Cool Spot, a café serving workers with buns, hot drinks and cigarettes sold individually.

His sunburned body covered from head to toe in flour, Niyas said his daily wage for carrying sacks on his back had more than halved to SLR 2,500 ($7) as the trucks stopped working. arrive, while bus fares doubled to 70 rupees.

“I’ve worked here since 1981 and it’s the worst I’ve ever had,” Niyas said. “It’s good that the former president is gone. All we ask of whoever replaces him is that we can eat three full meals a day. It can’t be that hard!

MT Nias
MT Niyas: “All we ask. . . is that we can have three full meals a day” © Antoni Slodkowski/FT

Nisham, the 26-year-old bearded owner, steps in as he clears tables for new customers, gives change and pours fresh tea: “The workers came maybe 10 times in a long day for a tea quick or to chat. Now they come maybe twice a day.

He announces dizzying price increases in the last quarter: the price of milk powder has tripled to reach SLR 3,000 per kg, while those of sugar and even tea, which Sri Lanka exports all over the world, have more than doubled.

Nisham is open about his hatred for the Rajapaksa family, which has dominated Sri Lankan politics for decades. But there’s also a hint of wounded pride, echoed in many other conversations. “We have many natural resources in our beautiful country: tea, rubber, coffee, precious stones,” he said. “We should be able to do better than that.”

He and his fellow traders complained that ghost brokers stepped in to fill the void after banks stopped lending money. A 65-year-old woman named Aruna, who sells curry leaves, said she borrowed SLR 10,000 to keep her business afloat. But she has to repay SLR 1000 per day for 12 days.

Day laborers like those at Lucky Cool Spot are among the hardest hit, but they are no exception. The World Food Program said 3 million people were receiving emergency humanitarian aid after food inflation hit 80% last month. Nearly 90% of all households skip meals or skimp to make food last longer, the organization added.

Afzal Fasehudeen, a construction engineer who came to Pettah to stock up on leeks and carrots, had no doubts who was responsible for the crisis.

“This whole disappearance was caused by massive mismanagement and a complete lack of proper planning. The Rajapaksas have started construction projects right, left and center – it’s ridiculous,” Fasehudeen said.

As the construction boom came to a screeching halt, Fasehudeen said he and many of his friends who finished college two years ago were planning to leave the country.

“My business could soon go bankrupt. I don’t want to leave, but if nothing changes in the next few months, I will try to find a job in one of the Gulf countries,” Fasehudeen said.

“Everything increases, but not income. People are angry.

Same Goal for SBA Regional Leaders: Helping Small Businesses

July 20, 2022

Montana Loans

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Castle Phil, business time

Aikta Marcoulier

Aikta Marcoulier worked for over 10 years running a center in Colorado Springs providing a range of small business services.

According to Marcoulier, it was a job that prepared her well for her latest efforts to help small businesses, but on a much larger scale.

President Joe Biden appointed Marcoulier in April as Region VIII administrator of the US Small Business Administration. She oversees federal agency programs and services in Colorado as well as Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah and Wyoming.

His new role is to support the Biden administration and help district SBA offices in his area achieve their goals. She also expects the job to involve extensive online meetings and extensive travel to connect with staff and business owners in a six-state region that spans more than 580,000 square miles, the most rural of all the SBA regions in the country.

At the same time, Marcoulier said one thing hasn’t changed, and that’s his goal to help small businesses succeed.

To that end, she said she’s excited about the resources the SBA offers, including financing assistance, government contracts, and disaster recovery.

She said she was particularly excited about an initiative to increase the share of federal contracts going to small businesses and strengthen domestic manufacturing and supply chains. Given the $1.2 trillion in funding included in the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, there are many additional opportunities for small businesses, she added.

Prior to her appointment, Marcoulier worked for more than 10 years as executive director of the Small Business Development Center in Colorado Springs.

A network of 14 full-time SBDCs and more than 50 part-time satellite offices are located throughout Colorado, including the Grand Valley.

The centers offer a range of services, including free and low-cost advice and instruction on all aspects of starting and growing a business.

In her more than 10 years as director, the Pikes Peak SBDC has twice received the SBA Region VIII Award for Excellence and Innovation. The 2014 award recognized efforts to help businesses recover from wildfires and floods.

Marcoulier received the Colorado State Star Award, the highest honor given to SBDC employees in the state.

In addition to his other duties, Marcoulier created and managed a cybersecurity program providing training and guidance to small businesses in Colorado.

Prior to joining the SBDC, Marcoulier worked as Director of Partnerships Marketing for Professional Bull Riders and before that as a Project Manager with the Native American Sport Council.

She earned a bachelor’s degree in economics and psychology from the University of Iowa. She then earned a master’s degree in business administration from the University of Phoenix.

Marcoulier said she was thrilled to accept the appointment as SBA regional administrator as she continued her work helping small businesses. She works out of Denver, but oversees agency operations in a six-state region.

The SBA offers a variety of programs and services, including those involving loans, government contracts, and disaster relief. The SBA’s Colorado District Office supported a total of nearly $1.4 billion in loans in fiscal year 2021, or $34 million in Mesa County.

Small businesses in Colorado are recovering from the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and related restrictions, Marcoulier said. But challenges persist, she said, including labor shortages and supply chain issues. Inflation and the threat of a recession could alter spending in a way that would affect small businesses.

Marcoulier said the SBA’s efforts to increase the proportion of federal contracts going to small businesses could help, especially given the funding that will be spent under the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act. She encouraged small business owners to work with the SBA and procurement technical assistance centers to learn more about selling goods and services to federal, state and local governments.

Marcoulier said she loves her job at the Pikes Peak SBDC, but now looks forward to continuing that work on a larger scale as the SBA’s regional administrator.

For more information about the programs and services offered by the U.S. Small Business Administration, visit the website at www.sba.gov.

Thomas McGarity on Trump and the fall of corporate law and order

July 18, 2022

Montana Mortgages

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Koch Industries spent $3.1 million in the first three months of the Trump administration, largely to secure the confirmation of Scott Pruitt as head of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

As of July 2018, more than sixteen federal investigations were underway into Pruitt’s mismanagement and corruption.

But Pruitt was just the first in a long line of pro-industry, incompetent and destructive agency chiefs put in place by the Trump administration in its effort to dismantle the protective edifice of federal government.

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke has been the subject of eighteen separate federal investigations and has been fired.

Now Pruitt and Zinke, having been ousted from public office, are making a comeback.

Pruitt is running for US Senate in Oklahoma.

And last week, Zinke won the Republican primary for Congress in Montana’s first congressional district.

“While many progressives rightly fear that red and purple states will send more Christian nationalists and Big Lie fanatics to Congress this year, they should also worry that these states will rekindle the fortunes of self-defeating wrecking balls. enlargers like Pruitt and Zinke,” Thomas McGarity, a law professor at the University of Texas, wrote recently in a Nation magazine article titled Two of the biggest crooks of the Trump era are plotting a comeback. “Pruitt and Zinke were members of the wrecking crew that President Donald Trump assembled in January 2017 to roll back public health and environmental protections inside the executive branch. Pruitt served as the first administrator of the Trump administration’s Environmental Protection Agency, and Zinke served as its first Interior Secretary.

“Both men were responsible for protecting public health and the environment. Yet both have shied away from their legal obligations in the Trump administration’s determined pursuit of “energy dominance.” And both had a strong sense of entitlement to spend taxpayer dollars on creature comforts, which quickly led to their downfall.

McGarity is the author of the new book Demolition Agenda: How Trump tried to dismantle the US government and what Biden must do to save it (New Press, 2022).

What is your analysis of the state of business regulation today compared to the early days of OSHA and EPA and major regulators?

“It’s a lot lower,” McGarity said Corporate crime reporter in an interview last month. “I published a book a few years ago called freedom to harm. In this book, I have described four assaults on regulation.

“The first one came during the Ronald Reagan years. It kind of fell through because they had a number of scandals with Anne Gorsuch and James Watt. And Bill Ruckelshaus came along and tried to get things done.

“But then we had the Clinton administration and Congress Gingrich. It was a serious threat to the administrative state. They were going after basic environmental laws, OSHA and regulations. But they failed.

“There was a bill that was supposed to be an omnibus bill to slow down regulatory agencies, but it failed by a vote. Clinton triangulated and significantly slowed down regulation.

“The third assault came with the George W. Bush administration. We have seen a total slowdown. No significant new regulations and many rollbacks of existing regulations. »

“The fourth assault was quite brief. It came with the 2010 election and the Tea Party and the leadership change in Congress. This slowed down the Obama administration. But when he won re-election in 2012, Obama realized he could never get anything out of Congress. But he accomplished a lot administratively.

“Then we had the fifth assault, which I write about in The Demolition Agenda. This was started by the Trump administration. And there we saw an attempt to roll back almost everything the Obama administration has done. They have sometimes failed in court.

Trump was elected as an outsider who would drain the swamp, clean the swamp. Ordinary people thought – well, this is a swamp. And you have documented the influence of business on the regulatory process in all jurisdictions.

Most people know that corruption is rampant inside the device. And they wanted to elect someone who would at least say: empty the swamp.

“People from all political walks of life agreed. And this populist revolution could have gone either way. People were really pissed that these Wall Street banks were being bailed out and ordinary people were struggling to pay their mortgages, they didn’t get a bailout. It could have gone either way.

“Unfortunately, Obama brought in people like Larry Summers, the same people who, under the Clinton administration, deregulated the banking industry. And Obama brought them in to try to fix the problem. The right, through his think tanks and ground troops, was able to refocus this populist anger away from the banks and various businesses that were making life miserable for ordinary people and redirected the anger back to the government.

The Trump machine effectively portrayed Hillary as a tool of Wall Street. And she was lecturing at Goldman Sachs for $650,000.

“Yes. And we’re talking about the same people. We’re talking about Larry Summers as an adviser to Hillary. And a lot of the same people who were advising Bill Clinton to repeal Glass Steagall. Instead of focusing on health care, Obama should have gone after Wall Street directly.

But they were married on Wall Street. They weren’t going to do that.

“There is this problem.”

Demolition Agenda features Scott Pruitt and Ryan Zinke, two returning Trump appointees.

“Pruitt was tasked with tearing down the EPA. He has made a good start in this work. Zinke was tasked with tearing down the Home Office. He also got off to a good start in that job before they were both totally immersed in the scandal.

“Pruitt is from Oklahoma. He was Oklahoma’s attorney general, where he took pride in eliminating the environmental protection division of the attorney general’s office and suing the EPA as often as he could to protect the industry from environmental pollution. ‘energy. He was sending letters to members of Congress and others, letters that were actually written by energy companies.

“Pruitt was an ideal choice if you wanted to eliminate the EPA. Turns out he had no use for the officials. Civil servants are heroes in my book. And the other heroes are the environmental and public interest groups that fought these efforts in court to tear down federal protections. Civil servants tried to do their jobs and follow their statutory mandates.

“But Pruitt and Zinke were trying to circumvent their officials. They were not interested in their expertise.

“The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) was created at the time quite recently to protect consumers from payday lenders and banks using abusive tactics. But then Richard Cordray, the first head of the CFPB left, and Trump appointed Mick Melvaney as his head. And eventually, the agency agreed with its challengers that the agency was structured unconstitutionally. Mulvaney said – we should allow the president to fire the head of the CFPB. The Supreme Court agreed.

“It was ironic because it allowed Biden to fire Kathleen Kraninger, who succeeded Mulvaney, and replace her with his own person.”

“But back to Pruitt and Zinke. They both left office under clouds of corruption. And now they’re running for Congress. Zinke won his primary this week. And Pruitt’s primary is later this month.

“They are like Trump. Scandals make them more attractive. They thumb their noses at propriety. This is something that mystifies me.

[For the complete Interview with Thomas McGarity, see page 36 Corporate Crime Reporter 26(11), June 27, 2022, print edition only.]

Avantax Advisory Services Inc. holds $636,000 worth of stock in M&T Bank Co. (NYSE:MTB)

July 18, 2022

Montana Lending

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Avantax Advisory Services Inc. increased its stake in the shares of M&T Bank Co. (NYSE: MTBGet a rating) by 24.1% in the first quarter, according to its most recent SEC filing. The company held 3,759 shares of the financial services provider after acquiring an additional 730 shares during the period. Avantax Advisory Services Inc.’s holdings in M&T Bank were worth $636,000 when it last filed with the SEC.

Other institutional investors have also recently bought and sold shares of the company. Spire Wealth Management increased its holdings of M&T Bank shares by 8.3% in the fourth quarter. Spire Wealth Management now owns 896 shares of the financial services provider valued at $138,000 after purchasing an additional 69 shares during the period. Russell Investments Group Ltd. increased its holdings of M&T Bank shares by 20.6% in the fourth quarter. Russell Investments Group Ltd. now owns 95,710 shares of the financial services provider valued at $14,689,000 after purchasing an additional 16,362 shares during the period. Wealthfront Advisers LLC increased its holdings of M&T Bank shares by 7.1% in the fourth quarter. Wealthfront Advisers LLC now owns 26,468 shares of the financial services provider valued at $4,065,000 after purchasing an additional 1,763 shares during the period. Trust Co. of Vermont increased its holdings of M&T Bank shares by 1.0% in the fourth quarter. Trust Co. of Vermont now owns 11,606 shares of the financial services provider valued at $1,783,000 after purchasing 117 additional shares during the period. Finally, Denali Advisors LLC increased its stake in M&T Bank shares by 21.3% in the fourth quarter. Denali Advisors LLC now owns 570 shares of the financial services provider valued at $88,000 after purchasing an additional 100 shares during the period. Institutional investors and hedge funds hold 87.61% of the company’s shares.

Insider activity

In other news, Vice President Kevin J. Pearson sold 5,000 shares of the company in a transaction dated Tuesday, May 17. The shares were sold at an average price of $169.71, for a total value of $848,550.00. Following the sale, the insider now directly owns 39,008 shares of the company, valued at approximately $6,620,047.68. The sale was disclosed in a legal filing with the SEC, accessible via the SEC website. Separately, Executive Vice President Robert J. Bojdak sold 525 shares of the company in a transaction dated Wednesday, June 8. The shares were sold at an average price of $177.82, for a total value of $93,355.50. Following the transaction, the executive vice president now owns 19,075 shares of the company, valued at approximately $3,391,916.50. The sale was disclosed in a document filed with the SEC, accessible via this link. Additionally, Vice Chairman Kevin J. Pearson sold 5,000 shares of the company in a trade dated Tuesday, May 17. The shares were sold at an average price of $169.71, for a total transaction of $848,550.00. Following the completion of the transaction, the insider now owns 39,008 shares of the company, valued at approximately $6,620,047.68. Disclosure of this sale can be found here. In the past ninety days, insiders have sold 7,725 shares of the company valued at $1,335,332. 0.73% of the shares are held by insiders of the company.

Analysts set new price targets

The VTT has been the subject of several research analyst reports. JPMorgan Chase & Co. cut its price target on M&T Bank shares from $200.00 to $195.00 and set a “neutral” rating for the company in a Friday, July 1 report. Deutsche Bank Aktiengesellschaft raised its price target on M&T Bank shares from $180.00 to $200.00 in a Friday, March 25 research note. StockNews.com upgraded M&T Bank shares from a “sell” to a “hold” rating in a Friday, June 10 research note. Wedbush raised its price target on M&T Bank shares from $187.00 to $212.00 in a Thursday, April 21 research note. Finally, the Goldman Sachs Group raised its price target on M&T Bank shares from $183.00 to $210.00 and gave the stock a “neutral” rating in a Monday, April 4 research note. Seven equity research analysts gave the stock a hold rating and seven gave the company a buy rating. According to data from MarketBeat, the stock has an average rating of “moderate buy” and a consensus target price of $190.51.

M&T Bank shares up 3.7%

Shares of MTB stock opened at $156.21 on Monday. The company has a debt ratio of 0.21, a quick ratio of 1.05 and a current ratio of 1.05. The company’s 50-day moving average is $166.21 and its 200-day moving average is $171.02. The stock has a market capitalization of $28.03 billion, a price/earnings ratio of 11.93, a PEG ratio of 0.74 and a beta of 0.89. M&T Bank Co. has a 52-week low of $128.46 and a 52-week high of $186.95.

M&T Bank (NYSE: MTBGet a rating) last released its results on Wednesday, April 20. The financial services provider reported earnings per share (EPS) of $2.73 for the quarter, beating analyst consensus estimates of $2.26 by $0.47. The company posted revenue of $1.45 billion for the quarter, versus $1.43 billion for analysts. M&T Bank posted a net margin of 29.31% and a return on equity of 11.45%. During the same period of the previous year, the company achieved EPS of $3.41. Sell-side analysts expect M&T Bank Co. to post EPS of 15.12 for the current year.

M&T Bank announces dividend

The company also recently announced a quarterly dividend, which was paid on Thursday, June 30. Shareholders of record on Wednesday, June 1 received a dividend of $1.20. The ex-dividend date was Tuesday, May 31. This represents a dividend of $4.80 on an annualized basis and a dividend yield of 3.07%. M&T Bank’s payout ratio is 36.67%.

M&T Bank Company Profile

(Get a rating)

M&T Bank Corporation operates as a bank holding company that provides commercial and retail banking services. The Company’s Business Banking segment provides deposit, lending, cash management and other financial services to small businesses and professionals. Its Commercial Banking segment provides deposit products, commercial loans and leases, letters of credit and cash management services to medium and large commercial enterprises.

See also

Institutional ownership by quarter for M&T Bank (NYSE:MTB)



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3 Crypto Stocks to Buy Before a Crypto Bounce

July 16, 2022

Montana Lending

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The dismal performance of the crypto market has not only impacted cryptocurrencies themselves, but also companies that incorporate these assets into their business models. The crypto landscape seems to be changing day by day, but stocks like Coinbase (PIECE OF MONEY 0.69%), Marathon Digital Backgrounds (MARA 0.50%)and To block (SQ 5.70%) are best positioned to capitalize on a potential rebound in cryptocurrencies.

Coinbase

Neil Patel (Coinbase): With down actions a whopping 78% in 2022 (as of July 12), Coinbase tracked the significant weakness that plagued the broader crypto market. But the company has proven it can thrive if the conditions are right, making it a great stock to own in a turnaround scenario.

Coinbase’s business deteriorated in the first quarter, which is part of the reason why the stock took such a beating. In the first quarter of 2022, the company generated 87% of its total sales through transaction fees which depend on the volume of transactions mainly from retail customers on its platform. Unsurprisingly, as the entire digital asset market crashed, investor interest in cryptocurrencies also increased. And that means less activity on Coinbase’s network, which translates to net revenue of $1.2 billion in the first quarter, down 27% year-over-year.

If the crypto market rebounds, it’s not hard to see how Coinbase would benefit immediately. A rise in crypto prices would attract speculators looking to chase the upside yields, resulting in higher fees for the business. In 2021, a strong market for cryptocurrencies, Coinbase generated $3.6 billion in profit on $7.4 billion in revenue, up 1,025% and 545%, respectively, from the last year. The company is undoubtedly affected by the volatility of crypto, but in good times, the finances speak for themselves.

Besides being just a brokerage and exchange operator profiting from rising crypto asset prices, Coinbase’s management team, led by Founder and CEO Brian Armstrong, hopes to build a crypto economy dominated by crypto assets. utility rather than through financial speculation. The goal is to use cryptography to help create a new financial system and application platform.

Additionally, Coinbase Ventures, the company’s in-house investment arm, has made hundreds of investments in crypto businesses around the world. This gives Coinbase even more skin in the game to benefit from if things turn around and valuations rise again. Therefore, it is hard to find better stock than Coinbase that investors should consider in anticipation of a crypto rebound.

Marathon

RJ Fulton (Marathon Digital Holdings): Marathon Digital Holdings is the largest Bitcoin mining company by market capitalization – and for good reason. Since its inception in 2010, the company has gone through several crypto winters and prioritized innovative business models that are needed in a competitive industry. While in the midst of the current crypto winter, Marathon is still pursuing new ways to stay profitable.

Marathon has been busy for the past two months. The company has begun moving miners from their primary location in Montana to a new facility in West Texas that will offer lower energy costs.

These miners leaving Montana will join 19,000 other miners who are currently awaiting federal approval to get power so they can start mining Bitcoin. Once powered up, the 19,000 miners will increase Marathon’s mining power by nearly 50% from current levels.

To quantify mining power, a statistic known as hashrate is used. Hashrate is measured in exahashes per second (EH/s). It could be compared to the power of a car. Marathon’s current hashrate is only around 3.9 PE/s. This ranks near the top of the industry, but not as high as the company hopes it will be in the future.

The company has set a goal to increase its hashrate to 23.3 PE/s by 2023, an increase of almost 800%. To achieve this, another 49,000 miners are expected to join the 19,000 waiting for power in West Texas by the end of September. And the company does not stop there. Not only does it plan to increase its capacity, but it has also pledged to be carbon neutral by 2023.

Marathon leads an industry that is no stranger to innovation. The widespread crypto downturn has shredded Bitcoin mining company stocks. Companies that continue to innovate are the ones investors should be looking to add to their portfolio if a crypto rebound is on the horizon.

To block

Michael Byrne (Block): Although not as closely associated with cryptocurrency as Coinbase or Marathon Digital, Block (the company formerly known as Square) has a strong claim to be the ultimate Bitcoin stock. It starts with the CEO. Jack Dorsey has been one of Bitcoin’s most ardent and visible supporters in years and has reportedly stepped down as CEO of Bitcoin. Twitter so he can focus more on bitcoin. The company even changed its name from Square to Block to more directly reflect its focus on Bitcoin and blockchain technology. But it’s not just about talking – whether it’s onboarding millions of users to the Bitcoin Lightning Network with Cash App or developing new Bitcoin mining rigs, Block is becoming an increasingly part of more entrenched of bitcoin’s future.

Block brought the Bitcoin Lightning Network, a solution that allows Bitcoin to scale efficiently for small transactions, to Cash App in 2022 and put it in front of over 40 million users. Users of Cash App’s Cash Card products can choose to round up their debit or credit card purchases and use the change to buy Bitcoins. Cash App users can also choose to convert part of their salary into Bitcoin seamlessly. Miles Suter, Cash App’s Crypto Product Manager, said: “This is the biggest rollout of a feature like this to date. With two clicks, you’ll be able to choose a percentage between one and a hundred and boom. , you have finished. ”

Outside of Cash App, Block partners with Telsa on a joint venture to mine Bitcoin in Texas using the company’s Megapacks and solar panels. Elsewhere, Block’s “TBD” business segment is working on ambitious if somewhat esoteric projects like developing what it calls Web5, a bitcoin-centric answer to Web3, and a decentralized bitcoin exchange. It’s important to note that Block is more a play on broader Bitcoin adoption than cryptocurrencies as a whole, as Dorsey is an outspoken Bitcoin maximalist. Also, it’s worth noting that the company’s bitcoin ventures are only a small part of its business today, unlike stocks like Coinbase or Marathon Digital which have much more direct exposure to cryptocurrency.

Block is a boon for bitcoin because it brings millions of new users into the bitcoin network. On the other hand, Block will also benefit from the growing interest and adoption of Bitcoin by the general public, as it is arguably the best known and easiest way for a new user to start getting involved. in bitcoin.

CUNA’s Stverak: CUs continue to meet needs in a difficult economy | 2022-07-15

July 15, 2022

Montana Economy

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Credit unions are invested in their communities because they are part of the community, Jason Stverak, CUNA’s deputy advocacy director for congressional relations, said on AM 1100 The Flag this week. Stverak spoke with host Scott Hennan on issues including rising consumer costs, the role of community financial institutions and the business lending climate.

“We don’t see the signs of a healthy, growing economy,” he said, adding that consumers “are increasingly turning to their community financial institutions like credit unions to solve the problem: how are they dealing with these tough financial times?”

Stverak also noted that credit unions continue to find ways to serve members and businesses as costs and interest rates rise.

“Credit unions are working with their members to grow small businesses and keep them open during these difficult times,” he said. “Our figures show that the number of loans granted to credit unions is 8% higher at this time this year compared to last year. So we are seeing a lot more members turning to us to meet their needs.

The show airs from Fargo, ND and reaches listeners across the state, as well as Minnesota, Montana and South Dakota.

Gianforte appoints affordable housing task force | 406 Politics

July 15, 2022

Montana Loans

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Gov. Greg Gianforte on Thursday appointed a committee to tackle Montana’s housing crisis, asking the group to recommend steps the state can take to address affordability and availability.

Gianforte on Thursday signed an executive order creating the new Housing Advisory Council. The 26-member task force will meet for the first time next week with a directive to make recommendations to the state legislature and state agencies to “increase the supply of affordable and accessible housing for the workforce”.

“Owning a home is part of the American dream, but for more than a decade it has become increasingly difficult for Montana residents to afford to own or rent a home,” Gianforte said in a statement, calling the current regulations “heavy”. ”

The executive order also cites a labor shortage in construction, zoning, a lack of entry-level homes, and a lack of property developers and land for development. Population growth outstripped new housing starts, and increased demand and supply chain delays pushed construction costs up more than 18%, the order said.

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“Montana is facing an affordable and accessible housing crisis that poses significant challenges to hard-working Montanese, employers, communities, and the economic health of the state,” the order reads.

The order directs the task force to release a report to the Legislative Assembly by October 15 on potential legal changes and a report to the governor by December 15 on actions that state agencies or local governments can take. Without limiting the scope, the order again identifies regulations and zoning as considerations in reporting.

The task force announcement comes a day after Democratic lawmakers proposed spending $500 million of the state budget surplus on housing, specifically to fund low- or no-interest loan programs. to finance multi-family housing.

The executive order does not specifically mention public funding as a potential solution, but neither does it eliminate it.

Montana Department of Environmental Quality Director Chris Dorrington will chair the task force. Other members include other state and local officials, business interests, and housing experts.

In May, Helena Area Habitat for Humanity ran a full-page ad in the Independent Record imploring the governor and other state and local officials to take specific action to address the housing crisis.

Executive Director Jacob Kuntz is among the board appointees. He expressed some encouragement at the task force news on Thursday.

“A lot of action is needed on housing right now,” he said. “…Our big thing here is that when you think about housing, it’s not just for the poorest of people, but it’s part of the job to help run Montana, part of the economy. of State.”

Kuntz described a housing talk trap as falling into solution silos. Often, Republicans focus on regulatory issues while Democrats focus on finance by pushing for public funding. He hopes the task force will be able to bridge some of these divides and focus on solutions such as infrastructure and incentivizing for-profit and non-profit construction.

“Everything has to be on the table to do that,” Kuntz said. “The solution is to build more houses. There is no other solution.”

The council will meet next Wednesday in Helena.

Other members of the working group include:

  • Senator Ellie Boldman, D, Missoula
  • Senator Greg Hertz, R, Polson
  • Representative Danny Tenenbaum, D, Missoula
  • Rep. Sue Vinton, R, Billings
  • Patrick Barkey, Ph.D., director of the Bureau of Business and Economic Research at the University of Montana
  • Terry Brockie, CEO of Island Mountain Development Group
  • Ross Butcher, Fergus County Commissioner
  • Kendall Cotton, President and CEO of the Frontier Institute
  • Nathan Dugan, President and Co-Founder of Shelter WF
  • Mark Egge, Affordable Housing Advocate, Data Scientist and Former Bozeman Planning Board Member
  • Laurie Esau, Commissioner of the Department of Labor and Industry
  • Jaclyn Giop, president of the Montana Water Well Drillers Association
  • Eugène Graf, owner of EG Construction
  • Emily Hamilton, Ph.D., Principal Investigator and Director of the Urbanity Project at Mercatus Center
  • Adam Hertz, secretary of the Montana Board of Housing
  • Amanda Kaster, Director of the Department of Natural Resources and Conservation
  • Bob Kelly, Mayor of Great Falls
  • Bill Leininger, president of the Montana Association of Realtors
  • Todd O’Hair, president and CEO of the Montana Chamber of Commerce
  • Scott Osterman, Commerce Department Director
  • Nicole Rolf, senior director of government affairs at the Montana Farm Bureau Federation
  • Mike Smith, Glacier Bank Market President
  • Valerie Stacey, Lewis and Clark County Environmental Health Specialist
  • Montana Housing Coalition Steering Committee Member Don Sterhan; President and CEO of Mountain Plains Equity Group





Tom Kuglin is Deputy State Bureau Editor of Lee Newspapers. Its coverage focuses on the outdoors, recreation and natural resources.

Which markets are hot and which are not? | New

July 14, 2022

Montana Lending

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Before the coronavirus recession, Utah’s housing market was on fire. Then came the COVID-19 pandemic, which sent residents of Northern California and Seattle in search of affordable homes and more space, and an already hot market intensified.

Dave Robison, former president of the Utah Association of Realtors, simply summarizes the activity. “It’s crazy,” says Robison, a Salt Lake City real estate broker.

Its evaluation is not only the art of the sale. Home prices in Utah have soared as Californians flock to the state. Utah has the fastest pace of job growth in the nation, along with the lowest unemployment rate, few mortgage defaults, and low local and state taxes.

All of these factors propelled Utah to the top spot on Bankrate’s Housing Heat Index when it debuted in 2020. Utah continues to hold the top spot for the first quarter of 2022. Residential Real Estate boomed during the coronavirus recession, and Utah became a particularly desirable market.

Other states in the Rocky Mountain time zone are also booming. Montana, Arizona and Nevada rank second, fourth and eighth respectively in the Bankrate Index.

At the opposite end of the list is Louisiana, where price appreciation is among the slowest in the country and mortgage defaults are among the highest. Hawaii – a state that has been hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic – has fallen from the bottom of Bankrate’s ranking. It rose from dead last in the first quarter ranking to 12th in the index based on winter economic data.

The 5 States With The Fastest Housing Economies

The Housing Heat Index shows how state housing markets are faring in the coronavirus-fueled housing boom and how they might fare in the future. To calculate the ranking, Bankrate analyzed six data points: annual house price appreciation, share of mortgages in arrears, unemployment, annual employment growth, cost of living index statewide and state-by-state tax burdens.

These five states had the strongest housing economies in the first quarter of 2022:

1. Utah – Its home values ​​jumped 26.8% in the 12 months that ended March 31, the third best among US states, according to the Federal Housing Finance Agency. Utah posted the lowest unemployment rate in the nation in March 2022, according to a Bankrate analysis of Labor Department data. Additionally, Utah’s tax burden is among the lowest in the country, according to the Tax Foundation.

2. Montana – Home values ​​soared 25% and Montana posted the top five spots in delinquent mortgages, job growth and tax burden.

3. Florida – Sunshine State home values ​​have jumped 30%, job growth is strong and taxes are low.

4. Arizona – Home values ​​jumped 28%, the best in the nation, and few homeowners fell behind on their loans.

5. Tennessee – Home values ​​are up 26%, job growth is strong and the cost of living is moderate.

Homebuyers are looking for affordability, space

Significant rankings of Mountain Time Zone states illustrate a shift in the housing market: Americans are still attracted to healthy labor markets, but even before the coronavirus pandemic, they were increasingly unwilling to pay to live in places like San Jose, Seattle and Boston.

COVID-19 has caused many people – especially those who can work remotely – to leave the more expensive areas for more affordable regions.

“We are seeing the preparations for a new affordable migration,” says Mark Vitner, senior economist at Wells Fargo. “The beneficiaries of this change have largely been the mid-sized metros in the western mountain states.”

The median price of a single-family home sold in Silicon Valley during the first quarter was $1.88 million, according to the National Association of Realtors. The typical price in Salt Lake City was $556,900 – above the national median, but not dramatically, and just a fraction of the price paid by residents of Northern California.

The price gap has prompted many people in high-cost markets to consider moving. The notion is particularly appealing to workers who can take their well-paying jobs to areas with lower costs of living.

“People suddenly have the ability to choose where they live, because they’re not tied to an office,” says Alicia Holdaway, agent at Summit Sotheby’s International Realty in Draper, Utah, and former chair of the Salt Lake City Board of Realtors. . “We have net immigration that has been happening for years, and it has only increased.”

Every boom brings its drawbacks, of course. In some cases, newcomers to the Utah housing market are loaded with money and ready to drive up prices.

“There’s always a setback,” Holdaway says. “We have seen housing affordability become a crisis.”

The 5 States With The Coolest Housing Savings

As a nationwide housing boom rages, every state saw property values ​​rise in the 12 months ending in September. However, some state economies are struggling with weak job growth and other challenges. The bottom five in our index:

47. Connecticut – This state showed poor performance across the board.

48. Washington, DC — The district’s score was dragged down by low appreciation, high unemployment, and a heavy tax burden.

49. Alaska – Slow job growth and high unemployment have weighed on the northernmost state.

50. Maryland – The state posted a relatively weak 11% appreciation, along with a high level of delinquent loans and a sluggish job market.

51. Louisiana – It ranks worst for delinquent loans, with 6.8% of homeowners behind on their mortgage payments. Louisiana is also doing poorly in terms of price appreciation, job growth and tax burden.

State Democrats hope to use $1 billion budget surplus in new proposal

July 14, 2022

Montana Economy

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With the next legislative session still six months away, Democrats in Montana are looking at a state budget surplus of more than $1 billion. They propose investments in affordable housing, child care and mental health care.

State finance experts from the Legislative Tax Division forecast that tax revenue generate an estimated surplus of $1.7 billion. They attribute the windfall to a variety of factors, including a strong stock market and a national economy boosted by federal dollars.

Montana Democratic lawmakers say they have a plan for that money.

House Minority Leader Kim Abbott and other lawmakers presented their proposal outside the state capitol on Wednesday.

“We hear over and over again that it’s hard to live in the community where you work, companies are struggling to hire,” Abbott said. “It’s difficult for people looking to re-enter the workforce who have been hit extremely hard over the past two years to find affordable child care.”

Democrats want to spend $500 million on affordable housing initiatives, $250 million on property tax relief, $125 million to help child care providers and parents in need , and $125 million to expand access to mental health care.

In a statement, Republican Senate Majority Leader Cary Smith said the strength of the state’s economy was due to Republican-backed policies, such as tax cuts. Smith says Republicans “look forward to continuing to be good stewards of Montana’s economy and providing new tax relief to Montanans.”

Gov. Greg Gianforte said in a response to the proposal that he urges Montana Democrats to join President Joe Biden’s call to “stop reckless spending and get inflation under control.”

The Legislative Tax Division says revenue growth is volatile and subject to change given factors it attributes to creating the surplus, such as one-time federal stimulus funds. The analysis predicts that revenue growth will rise and then fall by around 10% in the coming years.

US-based Here lets you make fractional vacation rental investments starting at $100 – TechCrunch

July 13, 2022

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Airbnb started out as a place where owners could rent out rooms and more in their own private residences to earn a bit of extra income, but it quickly evolved into something a little more specialized: a platform where a large part of the inventory became listings of those who owned property primarily as an investment vehicle. Now, an American startup called Here is announcing funding to create a democratizing twist on the provider side of that equation: a platform that allows people to become fractional investors in these vacation rentals, starting with stakes as low as 100. $.

Here secured a $5 million seed round led by Fiat Ventures, with participation from Joe Montana’s Liquid 2 Ventures, Mucker Capital, Basecamp Ventures and Cooley, bringing the total raised to date to $7 million, including including a first funding round earlier this year. Here we are using this latest injection of capital to invest in market growth, user growth, and product. It will make real estate acquisitions for the platform using debt raised separately from this equity.

Corey Ashton Walters, founder and CEO of the Miami, Florida-based startup, said when Airbnb was preparing to go public in 2020, he was looking for new ideas for a business in the real estate industry. He was inspired by real estate investment portal Roofstock and art investment platform Masterworks to create a new startup that allows retail investors to “own shares” of a vacation rental home with even an investment of $100.

Picture credits: Here.co

“Vacation rentals are an investment opportunity that historically was only available to the wealthy. Here has created a transparent and simple way for everyday investors to participate in this market, and support their mission to ‘Opening this opportunity to everyone was an easy decision,’ Adam Nash, CEO and co-founder of Daffy and former CEO of Wealthfront, said in a statement, who is an angel investor in the company.

To be perfectly clear, Here is not timeshare: you cannot book time off to stay in the property as an investor; it is simply investing in the property to earn dividends from other tenants and potential property sales.

Partial investment in houses next to others is also not an entirely unique idea. There are other startups, like US-based Pacaso – which has raised over $1.5 billion to date according to Crunchbase – and Mexico-based Kocomo, which allow you to have partial ownership of a vacation home. And in the United States and other markets, there are REITs, trusts where investors support real estate games.

The twist here is the low barrier to entry, $100, versus potentially thousands of dollars on the other platforms.

Fractional investing has been a very strong theme in the fintech world, where it’s used by neobanks and others to give users a way to buy fractional shares in premium stocks that might otherwise be too expensive. Others like Rally have taken the idea and applied it to the world of collectibles.

Here’s the model that works like this: the company acquires a property and makes it “season rental ready” through its own investments. Then he lists it in an IPO to investors at a price that includes all those expenses. All properties adhere to the rule of $1 = 1 property stock. Once all the shares are sold, Here places them on various vacation rental portals like Airbnb, Homeaway, and Booking.com for staycations. It then pays quarterly dividends to investors from the profits made by that property during the period.

The goal is to hold a vacation rental for five to seven years and then resell it on the market. Shareholders will receive payments based on their respective ownership stakes. The company deducts maintenance fees from dividends and final appreciation before the money is released to investors.

So how does Here make money? Ashton Walters said the company charges a supply fee of 1% to 10% depending on the purchase price – similar to a realtor’s fee – when a home is listed for investment. The company also charges a 1% annual asset management fee on the property. He also owns a minimum of 1% ownership to have “skin in the game,” so other investors can invest with confidence.

Picture credits: Here.co

Here officially opened its portal to the public earlier, and it has listed three properties in Bear, California, Clearwater, Florida and Gatlinburg, Tennessee, with a fourth going live shortly. Currently, it has over 30,000 registered users on the site, including 1,000 active investors. Ashton Walters said a list usually has 400-500 seats for investments, so it’s difficult to accommodate all users.

To comply with regulations, the company mentions all investment variables in its SEC circular. Before launching the property for investment on Here, the company acquires it and submits the offer to the SEC for approval. Each property is owned by an LLC, which protects investors from personal liability in the event of default in payment or bank repossession.

There are some things investors should consider when investing on Here. The company says it uses a mixed equity and debt financing model to acquire homes. Although it buys some properties outright, it has a mortgage component in others. Here claims that all such information is disclosed on the offering page and the official offering circular.

There is a question of investment returns when the housing market crashes. Here he said he intends to hold out indefinitely in the event of a downturn. “The idea is not just to survive a recession, but to thrive through it,” he said. The company also noted that often when house prices fall, rents rise, so it hopes properties will generate more cash flow for investors during the recession.

The company is ambitiously aiming to expand its lineup of offerings to launch 70 to 100 properties in 20 vacation destinations like New York’s Hudson Valley and Pennsylvania’s Pocono Mountains over the next year. It also plans to launch its own competitor Airbnb where it will list the properties it owns for members and the general public in the future.

“We have halted ad spend for the past 60 days because we don’t have enough supply to meet demand. Our last ad sold out in five hours. Short-term rentals are having their breakthrough moment. be recognized as an asset class, so our goal is to capture the market and become a trusted brand in this space,” said Ashton Walters.

Brush fire in the area of ​​Highways 285 and 8 near Mount Lindo prompts evacuations

July 13, 2022

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JEFFERSON COUNTY, Colo. (KRDO) – A reported bushfire in Jefferson County has forced evacuations.

At 3:23 p.m. Tuesday, the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office (Jeffco) said crews were responding to the fire burning in the area of ​​Highway 285 and Highway 8 near Mount Lindo.

Officials said the blaze, dubbed the Snowcreek Fire, was on the south side of the highway and was spreading south. Although no structures were immediately threatened, authorities announced mandatory evacuations.

At 3:37 p.m., the Jeffco Sheriff’s Office declared a full evacuation for Mount Lindo and Willow Springs Point. At that time, officials announced that the evacuation site was The Fort.

However, at 4:35 p.m. the sheriff’s office said the evacuation center had been moved to Bear Creek High School.

Jeffco Sheriff personnel conducted door-to-door evacuations.

According to the sheriff’s office, West Metro Fire and Air Support arrived on the scene to assist in the effort. Douglas County lends its helicopter to the effort.

West Metro Fire said the area was difficult to access, three fire crews with hand tools were forced to walk to the fire.

Authorities also say Highway 8, Snowcreek Lane and Tiger Bend Lane are closed.

Sri Lanka’s president flees the country

July 12, 2022

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COLOMBO, Sri Lanka – Sri Lanka’s president fled the country early Wednesday, days after protesters stormed his home and office as well as the official residence of his prime minister amid an economic crisis in three months which caused severe shortages of food and fuel.

President Gotabaya Rajapaksa, his wife and two bodyguards left on a Sri Lankan Air Force plane bound for the city of Malé, the capital of the Maldives, according to an official. Immigration who spoke on condition of anonymity due to the sensitivity of the situation.

Rajapaksa had agreed to step down under pressure. Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe has said he will leave once a new government is in place.

Lawmakers agreed to elect a new president next week but struggled on Tuesday to decide on the composition of a new government to pull the bankrupt country out of economic and political meltdown.

The promised resignations did not end the crisis and the protesters vowed to occupy official buildings until the main leaders left. For days, people have been flocking to the presidential palace almost as if it were a tourist attraction – swim in the pool, marvel at the paintings, and lounge on the beds piled high with pillows. At one point they also burned down the Prime Minister’s private house.

While lawmakers agreed late Monday to elect a new president from their ranks on July 20, they have yet to decide who will take over as prime minister and fill the cabinet.

The new president will serve the rest of Rajapaksa’s term, which ends in 2024 – and could potentially appoint a new prime minister, who would then need to be approved by parliament.

The prime minister is to serve as president until a replacement is chosen – an arrangement that is sure to further anger protesters who want Wickremesinghe out immediately.

Corruption and mismanagement have left the island nation saddled with debt and unable to pay for imports of basic necessities. The shortages have sown despair among the country’s 22 million people. Sri Lankans are skipping meals and queuing for hours trying to buy scarce fuel.

Until the latest crisis deepened, the Sri Lankan economy had grown and grown a comfortable middle class.

The political stalemate fueled the economic crisis as the absence of an alternative unity government threatened to delay the hoped-for bailout from the International Monetary Fund. The government must submit a debt sustainability plan to the IMF in August before reaching an agreement.

In the meantime, the country is counting on help from neighboring India and China.

Asked if China was in talks with Sri Lanka about possible loans, a Chinese foreign ministry official gave no indication if such talks were taking place.

“China will continue to offer assistance as our capabilities enable Sri Lanka’s social development and economic recovery,” spokesman Wang Wenbin said.

On Tuesday, religious leaders in Sri Lanka urged protesters to leave government buildings. Protesters have vowed to wait until Rajapaksa and Wickremesinghe are removed from their posts.

After the storming of government buildings, “it was clear that there was a consensus in the country that the direction of government needed to change,” said Jehan Perera, executive director of the National Peace Council of Sri Lanka, a think tank.

Months of protests have all but dismantled the Rajapaksa political dynasty, which has ruled Sri Lanka for most of the past two decades.

Protesters accuse the president and his inner circle of siphoning off money from government coffers for years and the Rajapaksa administration of hastening the country’s collapse by mismanaging the economy. The family denied allegations of corruption, but Rajapaksa acknowledged that some of his policies contributed to the collapse.

The president had not been seen or heard from since Saturday, although his office released statements indicating he was continuing to hold office.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To learn more, visit https://www.npr.org.

HTLF to Host Second Quarter Earnings Conference Call on April 25, 2022

July 11, 2022

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News and research before you hear about it on CNBC and others. Claim your one week free trial for StreetInsider Premium here.


DUBUQUE, Iowa, July 11, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — HTLF (NASDAQ: HTLF) announced today that the company plans to broadcast a conference call detailing its second quarter 2022 results live at 5:00 p.m. ET on Monday, July 25, 2022. Bruce K. Lee, President and Chief Executive Officer and Bryan R. McKeag, Vice -Executive Chairman and Chief Financial Officer, will lead the conference call. Financial results will be available on the company’s website on July 25, 2022, after market close. A question and answer session will follow the presentation.

Shareholders, analysts and other interested parties are invited to join the call. Please read the terms of appeal.

NEW PROCEDURE

Join the conference call via webcast:

  1. There is a new procedure for joining the HTLF results conference calls from July 25, 2022
  2. Within 10 minutes of the call start time, please visit this link: https://edge.media-server.com/mmc/p/hs5gr3re. Please complete the form and submit it; you will then be directed to the webcast which will begin at 5:00 p.m. EDT.

About HTLF

Heartland Financial USA, Inc., trading as HTLF, is a financial services company with assets of $19.2 billion. HTLF banks serve communities in Arizona, California, Colorado, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, New Mexico, Texas and Wisconsin. HTLF is committed to its core business, supported by a strong retail business, and provides a diverse range of financial services including cash management, wealth management, investments and residential mortgages. Additional information is available at www.htlf.com.

Bryan R. McKeag Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer (563) 589-1994 [email protected]

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Source: Heartland Financial USA, Inc.

Oportun Financial (NASDAQ:OPRT) Price target reduced to $14.00

July 11, 2022

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Opportun Financial (NASDAQ:OPRT – Get a rating) saw its target price lowered by equity researchers at Keefe, Bruyette & Woods from $21.00 to $14.00 in a report on Monday, Fly reports. Keefe, Bruyette & Woods’ price target suggests a potential upside of 70.94% from the company’s previous close.

A number of other equity analysts have also recently commented on the OPRT. BTIG Research reissued a “buy” rating and posted a $27.00 price target on Oportun Financial shares in a research note on Thursday, April 14. Loop Capital began covering Oportun Financial in a research report on Monday, March 14. They set a “buy” rating and a price target of $24.00 on the stock. Finally, Barclays cut its price target on Oportun Financial from $27.00 to $15.00 and set an “overweight” rating on the stock in a research report on Monday. Five equity research analysts rated the stock with a buy rating. Based on data from MarketBeat.com, Oportun Financial currently has an average rating of “Buy” and a consensus target price of $22.17.

Shares of NASDAQ OPRT were down $0.62 during Monday trading hours, hitting $8.19. The stock recorded a trading volume of 1,537 shares, compared to an average volume of 182,228 shares. The company has a market capitalization of $268.75 million, a price-earnings ratio of 2.90 and a beta of 1.50. The company’s fifty-day moving average price is $10.45 and its two-hundred-day moving average price is $14.15. Oportun Financial has a 52-week low of $8.11 and a 52-week high of $27.95.

(A d)

A big dollar battle could soon unfold between Tesla and this stock.

Opportun Financial (NASDAQ:OPRT – Get a rating) last announced its quarterly results on Monday, May 9. The company reported earnings per share (EPS) of $1.42 for the quarter, beating consensus analyst estimates of $0.37 from $1.05. The company posted revenue of $214.70 million in the quarter, versus analyst estimates of $198.40 million. Oportun Financial had a return on equity of 18.01% and a net margin of 12.76%. Oportun Financial’s quarterly revenue increased 58.7% year over year. In the same quarter a year earlier, the company had earned earnings per share of $0.27. As a group, equity research analysts expect Oportun Financial to post EPS of 1.96 for the current year.

In other news, Director Aida Alvarez sold 18,181 shares in a trade dated Thursday, June 2. The shares were sold at an average price of $11.46, for a total transaction of $208,354.26. Following the sale, the director now directly owns 18,874 shares of the company, valued at approximately $216,296.04. The transaction was disclosed in an SEC filing, available at this hyperlink. 5.50% of the shares are currently held by company insiders.

Several hedge funds have recently bought and sold shares of OPRT. Baker Tilly Wealth Management LLC increased its position in shares of Oportun Financial by 7.4% during the 4th quarter. Baker Tilly Wealth Management LLC now owns 10,404 shares of the company worth $211,000 after purchasing an additional 718 shares in the last quarter. M&T Bank Corp raised its position in shares of Oportun Financial by 4.0% in the 1st quarter. M&T Bank Corp now owns 23,246 shares of the company worth $334,000 after buying 894 more shares in the last quarter. PDT Partners LLC increased its position in shares of Oportun Financial by 7.3% during the 1st quarter. PDT Partners LLC now owns 19,794 shares of the company worth $284,000 after purchasing an additional 1,346 shares in the last quarter. Mitsubishi UFJ Kokusai Asset Management Co. Ltd. increased its position in shares of Oportun Financial by 46.3% during the 4th quarter. Mitsubishi UFJ Kokusai Asset Management Co. Ltd. now owns 4,578 shares of the company worth $94,000 after purchasing an additional 1,448 shares in the last quarter. Finally, Quantbot Technologies LP increased its position in shares of Oportun Financial by 113.3% during the 1st quarter. Quantbot Technologies LP now owns 3,200 shares of the company worth $45,000 after purchasing an additional 1,700 shares in the last quarter. 70.58% of the shares are currently held by institutional investors and hedge funds.

About Opportun Financial (Get a rating)

Oportun Financial Corporation provides financial services. It offers personal loans, car loans and credit cards. The company serves its customers online and by telephone, as well as through point of sale. It operates in 24 states in the United States, including Arkansas, Delaware, Indiana, Kentucky, Mississippi, Montana, North Dakota, New Hampshire, Oregon, South Carolina, South Dakota and Virginia.

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Analyst Recommendations for Oportun Financial (NASDAQ: OPRT)

This instant alert was powered by MarketBeat’s narrative science technology and financial data to provide readers with the fastest and most accurate reports. This story was reviewed by MarketBeat’s editorial team prior to publication. Please send questions or comments about this story to [email protected]

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Waiting for the last bitcoin mile

July 11, 2022

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Bitcoin rose 12.6% to end near $21,600 but rebounded from gains in the $20,500 area early in the day, registering a decline of 3.9% in the past 24 hours. Ethereum essentially copies the momentum of the first cryptocurrency, losing 3.8% in 24 hours to $1150. The top 10 altcoins are losing between 2.4% (BNB) and 5.5% (Solana).

The total crypto market cap, according to CoinMarketCap, rose 5.8% over the week to $916 billion. Bitcoin’s dominance index climbed 0.6% to 42.8% over the same period.

The Cryptocurrency Fear and Greed Index rose 13 points for the week to 24, but fell 2 points on Monday and remains in “extreme fear”.

BTC’s rise last week was halted by the 200-week moving average, now rising near $22,500. Bitcoin continued to move sideways for three weeks near the critical $20,000 level, the previous cycle high.

BTC has never fallen below these levels before, so it now has support from buyers confident in the long-term growth of the premier cryptocurrency. Another supporting factor was the rebound in financial markets, where the new semester was greeted by increased buying.

However, as always in recent months, many questions remain about the sustainability of the rebound in the context of a sharp increase in interest rates by the Fed and an economic slowdown.

Rockefeller International Managing Director Ruchir Sharma believes that the deleveraging process is not over and that BTC could fall further over the next six months as the stock market declines.

Galaxy Digital CEO Michael Novogratz says the decline in the cryptocurrency market is about to be over. However, there may be a final “tug” of the bears shortly. He pointed out that he doesn’t believe BTC will fall to $13,000.

Cryptocurrency lending service Celsius has transferred 25,000 wBTC tokens worth $528 million to the FTX exchange. The market fears that Celsius will sell off the tokens and drive down the bitcoin exchange rate. According to Arkham, Celsius lost $390 million in client funds on investments in DeFi and NFT.

Nobuaki Kobayashi, the trustee of the bankrupt Mt.Gox exchange, has begun preparations to repay creditors. The situation in the market could worsen if 150,000 BTC were distributed to MtGox users and immediately flooded the market.

The US Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) is investigating Voyager Digital. According to the agency, the cryptocurrency broker misled users by claiming that their assets were protected by the agency’s program.

This article was written by FxProAlex Kuptsikevich, Senior Market Analyst.

The culture war between states

July 10, 2022

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For decades, states have competed to attract business by touting local economic advantages in areas such as taxation, development incentives, labor quality and regulatory policy. Sometimes states also presented themselves to companies on more general principles such as quality of life and public investment in schools and infrastructure. Today, the battle for jobs and for the wealthiest residents has taken a new turn, reflecting the increasingly intense culture wars playing out in America. Faced with an increasingly difficult economic battleground, governors of Democratic-led states are launching companies based on social issues: abortion access, transgender rights and election laws. Blue state officials hope to attract companies that oppose red state legislation restricting abortion, overhauling voting practices or banning biological men from participating in women’s athletics. The stakes are high because business and residential migration patterns, and the economic gains that come with them, have shifted overwhelmingly to Republican-led states in post-pandemic America.

California Governor Gavin Newsom, who has said in the past that his state is forging a new blueprint for “what America is going to look like,” summed up the new Democratic approach. In a provocative and controversial video ad that aired on social media and TV stations over the July 4 weekend, Newsom offensive Florida policies on everything from abortion laws to school curriculum legislation that limit what young students can learn about gender. “Freedom is under attack from Republican leaders in states like Florida. Ban books. Limitation of speech. Make it harder to vote. Criminalize women and doctors,” the ad read. “I urge you all to join us in California, where we still believe in freedom. Freedom of speech. Freedom to choose.” The announcement amplified a message Newsom sent to businesses that left California in recent years. to head to Republican states.”Some businesses may be gone, come back. It’s a point of pride that we welcome you back, we want to celebrate that we have you back,” Newsom said.

That of the Supreme Court Dobbs decision annulling deer v. Wade seems to have played a catalytic role among Democratic governors. New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy, who recently signed legislation extending legal protections to women who come to his state for abortions, has contacted dozens of companies in states where abortion is banned, inviting them to move to Jersey. In a letter to businesses, Murphy said the Dobbs decision would have a “chilling effect.” . . on your ability to attract and retain top female talent while located in a state that has refused to recognize women’s reproductive freedom. The governor’s office later said of the letter, “Governor Murphy encourages businesses looking to support their employees to look to New Jersey, a state where they can be confident that the rights of women, the LGBTQIA+ community and voters will always be protected. .”

Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont issued a similar letter over the July 4 holiday weekend. “There are far-reaching implications for businesses and workers located in states that may significantly limit access to reproductive rights in the weeks ahead,” wrote Lamont, a former business executive. “Customers and employees will be drawn to states that protect reproductive rights for all.” In the letter, Lamont listed other reasons to move to Connecticut, including paid family medical leave, which business groups in the state actually opposed when it was enacted in 2019.

Republicans have hit back at this sensitization. A spokesperson for DeSantis called Newsom’s announcement “pathetic libel” and, pointing to migration figures from California, said people were fleeing “hell”. [Newsome] created in his state to come to Florida. The Republican National Committee, meanwhile, released a statement saying Newsom’s ads “remind Floridians how badly they don’t want to move to California.” Meanwhile, a spokesman for Georgia Governor Brian Kemp said of Murphy’s letter: ‘A sitting governor wouldn’t be spending his time doing this kind of desperate outreach if business was also in full swing. growth in his state. He would celebrate the announcement of multi-billion dollar projects and thousands of new jobs with quality businesses – as Governor Kemp has had the privilege of doing several times this year.

Whether this new twist on corporate outreach pays off remains to be seen, but blue states need to do something to stem their losses. IRS data shows that in 2020, as the pandemic raged and states imposed activity restrictions, residents, businesses and wealth left Democratic-ruled states in droves. New York and California alone collectively lost nearly $40 billion in net wealth leaving the state, while Texas and Florida captured some $30 billion net from residents moving in. The chart should show even bigger gains for 2021. Economic performance, meanwhile, has shifted sharply toward Republican-led states. Moody’s compared states on 13 recent economic metrics and found the best performing places dominated by Republican-led states, while eight of the ten worst economies were in blue states. Republican-run places clawed back all the jobs they lost during the pandemic and added 341,000 more; blue states are still about 1.3 million short.

The offshoring news hasn’t been good for Democratic states either. Hedge fund giant Citadel recently announced it was moving from Chicago to Miami, while Caterpillar is moving its headquarters to Texas from Illinois. Hewlett-Packard, a company synonymous with Silicon Valley, is moving from San Jose to Houston, while hedge funds like Elliot Management and Point72 are moving their headquarters from Manhattan and Connecticut, respectively, to Florida. As these moves suggest, the post-pandemic advantage that red states have on traditional economic and trade issues appears to have widened. The ten states ranked by business executives this year as the best places to locate their businesses were Republican-leaning, led by Texas and Florida, while the ten least favored states by executives are solidly Democratic.

The reaction of certain blue states to the Dobbs decision intensified a growing culture war between the states. So far, this battle has been fought under limited economic conditions — for example, by states banning their employees from going to places with laws that local politicians oppose. Recently, for example, California announced that it would no longer pay for travel for its state employees in four states – Arizona, Indiana, Louisiana and Utah – because they passed laws prohibiting biological males who became female to compete in girls. school sports. California has now enacted travel bans in 22 states that Sacramento officials say have laws that discriminate against gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people, though Newsom has sparked controversy by passing vacation in one of those states, Montana. A handful of other Democratic states — Washington, Minnesota, New York, Vermont and Connecticut — have similar travel bans in place for multistate employees.

Democratic governors have been encouraged, it seems, to take the next step. They try to recruit companies based on cultural issues, in part because of the spread of “woke” attitudes in corporate America. Last year, Coca-Cola publicly criticized Georgia’s new election law, sparking a showdown with Republicans in the state, while Disney opposed Florida’s parental rights in education bill. , which limits discussion of gender in the early primary grades.

Even so, one of the hard and fast rules of economic development in the United States, articulated by the late Citicorp Chairman Walter Wriston, has been that “capital goes where it is welcome and stays where it is treated well”. . There is no indication that, in a highly competitive global economy, companies have suddenly decided to revoke this rule.

Photo by FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images

Commerce Bancshares (NASDAQ:CBSH) and M&T Bank (NYSE:MTB)

July 9, 2022

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M&T Bank (NYSE: MTBGet a rating) and Commerce Bancshares (NASDAQ: CBSHGet a rating) are both finance companies, but which company is better? We will compare the two companies based on the strength of their profitability, institutional ownership, analyst recommendations, risk, dividends, earnings and valuation.

Dividends

M&T Bank pays an annual dividend of $4.80 per share and has a dividend yield of 3.0%. Commerce Bancshares pays an annual dividend of $1.06 per share and has a dividend yield of 1.6%. M&T Bank pays 36.7% of its profits as a dividend. Commerce Bancshares pays 25.1% of its profits as a dividend. Both companies have healthy payout ratios and should be able to cover their dividend payments with earnings over the next few years. M&T Bank increased its dividend for 1 consecutive year and Commerce Bancshares increased its dividend for 1 consecutive year.

Analyst Notes

This is a breakdown of recent ratings and target prices for M&T Bank and Commerce Bancshares, as reported by MarketBeat.

Sales Ratings Hold odds Buy reviews Strong buy odds Rating
M&T Bank 0 6 seven 0 2.54
Bancshares Trading 1 2 0 0 1.67

M&T Bank currently has a consensus price target of $193.31, suggesting a potential upside of 21.64%. Commerce Bancshares has a consensus price target of $66.62, suggesting a potential downside of 0.77%. Given M&T Bank’s stronger consensus rating and higher likely upside, equity research analysts clearly believe that M&T Bank is more favorable than Commerce Bancshares.

Risk and Volatility

M&T Bank has a beta of 0.89, indicating that its stock price is 11% less volatile than the S&P 500. In comparison, Commerce Bancshares has a beta of 0.81, indicating that its stock price stock is 19% less volatile than the S&P 500.

Profitability

This table compares the net margins, return on equity and return on assets of M&T Bank and Commerce Bancshares.

Net margins Return on equity return on assets
M&T Bank 29.31% 11.45% 1.20%
Bancshares Trading 36.83% 15.45% 1.48%

Benefits and evaluation

This table compares revenue, earnings per share and valuation of M&T Bank and Commerce Bancshares.

Gross revenue Price/sales ratio Net revenue Earnings per share Price/earnings ratio
M&T Bank $6.11 billion 4.67 $1.86 billion $13.09 12.14
Bancshares Trading $1.41 billion 5.75 $530.77 million $4.22 15.89

M&T Bank has higher revenue and profit than Commerce Bancshares. M&T Bank trades at a lower price-to-earnings ratio than Commerce Bancshares, indicating that it is currently the more affordable of the two stocks.

Insider and Institutional Ownership

87.6% of M&T Bank shares are held by institutional investors. Comparatively, 67.9% of Commerce Bancshares shares are held by institutional investors. 0.7% of M&T Bank shares are held by insiders of the company. Comparatively, 3.2% of Commerce Bancshares shares are held by company insiders. Strong institutional ownership indicates that large fund managers, endowments, and hedge funds believe a stock is poised for long-term growth.

Summary

M&T Bank beats Commerce Bancshares on 9 out of 16 factors compared between the two stocks.

About M&T Bank (Get a rating)

M&T Bank Corporation operates as a bank holding company that provides commercial and retail banking services. The Company’s Business Banking segment provides deposit, lending, cash management and other financial services to small businesses and professionals. Its Commercial Banking segment provides deposit products, commercial loans and leases, letters of credit and cash management services to medium and large commercial enterprises. The Company’s commercial real estate segment originates, sells and services commercial real estate loans; and offers deposit services. Its discretionary portfolio segment provides deposits; securities, residential real estate loans and other assets; and short-term and long-term borrowed funds, as well as foreign exchange services. The Company’s Residential Mortgage Banking segment offers residential real estate loans to consumers and sells these loans in the secondary market; and purchases service rights on loans issued by other entities. Its Retail Banking segment offers current, savings and term accounts; consumer installment loans, auto and recreational finance loans, home equity loans and lines of credit, and credit cards; mutual funds and annuities; and other services. The company also offers fiduciary management and wealth management services; trustee and custodian; Insurance Agency; institutional brokerage and securities; and investment management services. It offers its services through bank offices, business banking centers, telephone and internet banking, and automated banking machines. As of December 31, 2021, the company operated 688 national banking offices in New York State, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Connecticut, Virginia, West Virginia, and the District of Columbia; and a full-service commercial banking office in Ontario, Canada. M&T Bank Corporation was founded in 1856 and is headquartered in Buffalo, New York.

About Commerce Bancshares (Get a rating)

Bancshares Trade LogoCommerce Bancshares, Inc. operates as a banking holding company for Commerce Bank which provides retail banking, mortgage banking, corporate, investment, trust and asset management products and services to individuals and to businesses in the United States. It operates through three segments: Consumer, Commercial and Wealth. The Consumer segment offers various banking products and services, including consumer deposits; consumer loans, such as automobile, motorcycle, marine, tractor/trailer, recreational vehicle, fixed and revolving, and other consumer loans; patient health care funding; real estate loans; indirect financing and other consumer financing; personal mortgage banking services; consumer installment loans; and consumer credit and debit cards. The Commercial segment provides business lending, leasing, international, business and commercial bank cards, securities custody and bond accounting; and commercial products, government deposits and related commercial cash management services, as well as the sale of fixed income securities to correspondent banks, corporations, public institutions, municipalities and individuals. The Wealth segment offers traditional trust and estate planning, advisory and discretionary investment portfolio management, brokerage, and private banking accounts. The Company also offers private equity investment, securities brokerage, insurance agency, specialty lending and leasing services, as well as online and mobile banking. It operates through a network of 287 locations in Missouri, Kansas, Illinois, Oklahoma and Colorado, as well as sales offices. Commerce Bancshares, Inc. was founded in 1865 and is headquartered in Kansas City, Missouri.



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Tourists head to Montana, scenic state parks amid travel boom

July 9, 2022

Montana Economy

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The tourist season in Montana has started with a bang.

Flooding in Yellowstone National Park and nearby communities. Avalanches and a not-yet-fully-open Going-to-the-Sun road in Glacier National Park.

Inflation, of course, plus high fuel prices.

“It’s one shot after another, isn’t it?” Barbara Neilan, executive director of Destination Missoula, the Convention and Visitors Bureau, told the Daily Montanan.

Still, visitors are heading to the Big Sky, and at least for now, economic security is generally strong, said Patrick Barkey, head of the University of Montana’s Bureau of Business and Economic Research. Some people might forgo a restaurant meal, for example, in order to keep a trip to Yellowstone on the schedule.

“Consumers have pretty high savings rates, so they have money to deal with some of these higher costs,” Barkey said.

“The damage is catastrophic”:Towns near Yellowstone fear impact of lost tourist season

In 2020, Montana’s state parks saw record attendance, with 3.4 million people, a tally that fell just 1.3% the following year, according to data from Montana Fish, Wildlife. and Parks. In the summer of 2020, the great outdoors felt relatively safe for many people as the coronavirus spread, but tourism this year could slow down a hair’s breadth; the first quarter shows an 8.6% decline in state parks compared to last year, although it is still up from 2019 and 2020.

“I don’t think it’s going to be quite the tear-jerking, roaring year than last year,” Barkey said of tourism in general.

At Makoshika State Park, the state’s largest, park superintendent Riley Bell said it’s still very busy, and while he doesn’t have official numbers yet, he would assume that the numbers so far have either reached about the same level as last year or are down slightly. . Last year, he said Makoshika had a record number of visits, around 150,000 for the calendar year.

This year he sees many foreigners, especially from Minnesota, as well as from California, Washington and Idaho. The landscape and fossils of the park’s badlands attract people from all over the world, and it sees many more tourists from Germany, Sweden and other European countries since COVID-19 blocked the first international flights.

“We’re starting to see a lot more international travellers,” Bell said.

Barkey agreed that the gradual reopening of international travel, which had been dormant, was going to hurt Montana’s economy. On the one hand, he said, it means Montanans can finally make their own trips to Europe, but it also gives foreigners a chance to get here, and he said demand for air flights is always “strong enough”.

“By the way, economically, these international (visitors) are spending more money,” Barkey said.

On the other hand, he said for individual communities, such as Red Lodge and Gardiner, the economic hit is serious this summer, although he said people who have Yellowstone National Park on their to-do list will find a way to get there.

Sherry Weamer, executive director of the Red Lodge area chamber of commerce, said the community again needs through traffic to Yellowstone, but in the meantime, Red Lodge itself is bustling. The July 4 weekend brought a record rodeo, she said, and a Beartooth motorcycle rally will run July 14-17, as will a car show July 22-23.

“Downtown is vibrant and bustling, and everyone is open,” Weamer said. “We just need those visitors to come back and hang out with us and enjoy our mountains five minutes from the outskirts of town.”

She said the city reopened quickly after the historic floods in June and the support of the governor and the president would be helpful. Still, she said she can’t wait for U.S. Highway 212 between Red Lodge and Cooke City to open, though she said travelers can take the Chief Joseph Scenic Byway for a nice drive.

“The flooding and closure will have a major impact on us,” Weamer said. “There is no way to overlook the attraction of Yellowstone National Park, and all this flood coverage has spread across the country. Now it is almost impossible to let people know that we are again open, so that’s another challenge.

In an email, Yellowstone noted that visitor numbers dropped in June because the park closed immediately after the flooding. But the park said a “modified reopening” was underway.

“Numbers will also be affected because only three of the five entrances are open,” the park said.

In western Montana, Neilan said occupancy was up 7% in Missoula in May of this year compared to last year, but June was down about 4%. %. She said it was also an interesting year for tourism in Montana.

“Montana as a whole has somehow been discovered”

On the one hand, the tourism industry is watching to see how much recent spikes in Montana can be attributed to the “COVID bubble,” she said. But Neilan said she believes some of the change is permanent.

“I think Montana as a whole has sort of been uncovered,” Neilan said.

In Missoula, events such as concerts and the Missoula Marathon are returning, and occupancy is around 80%, she said. Some Montana residents are finally flying to New York and San Francisco for vacations, but with inflation, she said others are staying closer to home for “holidays,” and Canadians are also returning to the Montana.

“I think there’s so much pent-up travel that people want to do that it’s not going to stop travel,” Neilan said. “I think what it’s going to do is maybe just change it up a bit.”

Go on the Road of the Sun

In Glacier, the Going-to-the-Sun road won’t open until July 13 at the earliest, said Gina Kerzman, the park’s public affairs manager. It’s later than usual, but visitor numbers so far show some admissions are still up from last year, and the popular West Glacier admission is down, but not a lot.

“Our headline numbers that we just released make it look like we’re starting the season strong,” Kerzman said. “We are on track for another busy year.”

She said Glacier never plans an opening date because the weather was unpredictable, but the plows crossed the Big Drift, and on Tuesday they started digging the gap and digging into the Logan Visitor Center. pass. Glacier saw record attendance in the fall of 2020.

“You get people, you have to have bathrooms. There’s just no getting around it,” Kerzman said.

She said visitors don’t need reservations for the St. Mary entrance on the east side of the park until Going-to-the-Sun Road is fully open. This means that by marking an opening date as close to July 13 as possible, people are assured that if they arrive on July 12, they can still hit the road without a ticket.

Kerzman also said Glacier experienced flooding. Although not as far as Yellowstone has seen it, it does mean hikers should check trail conditions on the park’s website and be prepared to make alternate plans if necessary, or crawl over debris. if a trail is open but messy.

“Some of the trails are badly damaged, so you can walk in mud,” Kerzman said, noting that it’s better to walk a muddy trail than to walk on the side of a path and damage vegetation.

Generally speaking, Barkey said inflation lowers purchasing power and will impact tourism in Montana. However, he said it remains to be seen whether negative forces will push people to stay put or if other factors will drive them away from their homes to gamble.

“It remains to be seen whether they will win,” Barkey said of the constraints on portfolios.

The Daily Montanan is a Helena-based nonprofit media outlet covering statewide politics and politics. It is affiliated with States Newsroom, a national 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization supported by grants and a coalition of donors and readers.

FEMA Flood Recovery Centers Open in Carbon, Park and Stillwater Counties | Local News

July 8, 2022

Montana Loans

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Locations to request assistance from the Federal Emergency Management Agency will open in several Montana counties in the coming days for areas affected by the June floods. FEMA will open both disaster recovery centers and mobile recording centers in Carbon, Park and Stillwater counties. All locations can help homeowners, renters and business owners who were affected by the severe flooding in June to request or understand assistance.

A disaster recovery center, jointly operated by FEMA and Montana Disaster and Emergency Services, will open in Carbon County. Representatives from FEMA, the Small Business Administration and other agencies will be at the center to explain disaster assistance programs and help eligible survivors apply for help.

The center will be open at 8 a.m. Saturday at Roosevelt Junior High School located at 413 S Oakes Ave in Red Lodge. Once open, the DRC will operate from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. seven days a week.

Additional disaster recovery centers will open next week in Stillwater County and Park County. In Stillwater County, DRC will be at Absarokee Elementary School at 327 South Woodward Ave. and will be open starting Tuesday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., 7 days a week. In Park County, the DRC will be at Park High School at 102 View Vista Drive in Livingston. The center opens Wednesday and will operate from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., seven days a week.

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Several mobile registration centers will also open in the affected areas. These locations will have Survivor Assistance Teams on site to assist with requests, inquiries, updates and referrals. They will be located at Fromberg Methodist Church at 14 North Montana Ave July 8-12 from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. The other registration center will be at Gardiner High School at 510 W. Stone Street Monday through Saturday. This center will be open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

It is not necessary to go to a center to ask for help. If possible, before going to a center, survivors should seek help from FEMA online by visiting DisasterAssistance.gov and clicking “Apply Online” or calling 800-621-3362. Multilingual operators are available. Toll-free numbers are open daily from 5 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mountain Time. If a person uses a relay service, such as a video relay service, captioned telephone, or the like, FEMA may use that service’s number for accessibility.

A FEMA app for smartphones or mobile devices is also available. For an accessible video on how to apply for FEMA assistance, applicants should go to youtube.com/watch?v=WZGpWI2RCNw.

FEMA financial assistance may include money for temporary housing, basic home repairs, or other disaster-related needs such as childcare, transportation, and medical, funeral, or dental expenses. .

Low-interest disaster loans from the U.S. Small Business Administration are also available to homeowners, renters, businesses, and most private nonprofit organizations to help with unpaid residential and commercial losses. covered by insurance. After registering with FEMA, survivors and businesses can apply online at the SBA website. https://disasterloanassistance.sba.gov/ela; or get information about SBA disaster loan applications by calling 800-659-2955 (800-877-8339 for the hearing impaired) or online at www.sba.gov/disaster.

What if you can’t “off budget” inflation? | national news

July 8, 2022

Montana Mortgages

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Inflation is a nightmare for many Americans who are already spending their money on basic necessities. What happens when those dollars lose value?

Their choice is probably not to cut streaming services or opt for private label groceries. Instead, they may have to choose between buying enough food and paying rent.

Families hardest hit by inflation usually have few savings and other resources. And that lack of access to wealth may be rooted in a history of inequality, says Phuong Luong, a Massachusetts-based certified financial planner and founder of Just Wealth, a financial education and consulting company.

For example, suppose generations of your family have been underpaid or restricted in where they can live, in part because of racist policies. Then inflation makes everything more expensive.

You may need to raise money to support not only yourself, but also members of your family or community. You may have to spend money and time to get to the grocery store or the doctor’s office.

“Your proximity to people with resources and people with wealth will be different depending on where you live and who you are,” says Luong. “There is a broader context than spending and budgeting.”

Whatever context describes your situation, here’s how to fight inflation if money is already tight.

Prioritize the essential

Aim to pay the expenses that allow you to live safely: housing (mortgage or rent), utilities and food. Also try to cover expenses that help you work, such as transportation, cell phone, and childcare.

The next level priorities are those that trigger major consequences if you don’t pay: taxes, alimony, and insurance.

For credit cards, try to pay at least your minimum because you might need that access to credit.

Tap local resources

If you’re struggling to pay your bills, find help. Luong suggests Findhelp.org, which lists local programs designed to cut costs in many categories.

Calling 211 or visiting 211.org can also help you find help with housing, health, food, and emergency expenses.

Pick up the phone

You can also save money by calling credit card and insurance companies, lenders, banks, cell phone providers and other businesses you pay.

With the pandemic affecting so many consumers, these companies “are a little more empathetic than they have been,” says Emlen Miles-Mattingly, co-founder of Onyx Advisor Network, a support platform based in Sacramento, Calif. , for underrepresented financial advisors.

They can suspend or reduce payments, for example, or cancel overdue invoices. Or they could lower your interest rate.

But you have to ask. And often, a patient phone call with customer service yields faster, more efficient results than an email or online form.

Connect with your community

To overcome financial difficulties, “the community is going to be major,” says Dasha Kennedy, an Atlanta-based financial activist and founder of Facebook community The Broke Black Girl.

Leaning on – or supporting – your family members, friends and neighbors can take many forms. For example, Kennedy points out how temporarily living with others can reduce housing expenses. Or you can pool your resources by sharing a vehicle or sharing a large expense.

To connect with supportive locals you haven’t met yet, check out libraries, religious organizations, and recreation centers. Or use virtual platforms like Facebook and Nextdoor.

In these in-person and online spaces, you can find free or low-cost goods and services. Maybe someone will donate second-hand clothes or walk your dog while you work.

Or ask for advice. Your neighbors can direct you to nearby free health resources, for example, or describe what has helped them get the most out of their money.

Take advantage of your skills

Of course, making more money helps too. If you’re already working, Kennedy recommends first trying to increase your income through your employer. Consider working overtime or negotiating raises and role changes, she says.

Or explore parallel work – with caution. Many online gigs could waste your time, take your money or misuse your personal information.

“It’s high time for frauds and scams,” says Kennedy. Trust your instincts and read the reviews. Also check the Federal Trade Commission and Better Business Bureau websites for advice on avoiding scams.

The most effective way to earn money? “Monetize the skills you already have,” says Kennedy. These can include anything from cleaning and organizing to writing and designing.

Assuming you start without customers, she suggests reaching out to your community again.

“You may not have time to build trust and reputation, so you’ll have to rely on personal relationships,” she says. Ask your friends, neighbors and family members to promote and vouch for you.

Pay attention to your mental health

Money struggles are exhausting. So regularly “connect with yourself,” says Miles-Mattingly. Identify what makes you feel better, whether it’s walking outside, calling a friend, meditating or reading.

If time is tight, make your activity fast and consider Miles-Mattingly’s point: “People, when stressed, don’t have the best decision-making skills.” And tough times mean tough decisions. It pays to feel centered before negotiating a lower bill or accepting side work.

To avoid feeling overwhelmed during times of financial stress, Kennedy tries not to think too much about the unpredictable future. Instead, she suggests “focusing on the day.”

This article was written by NerdWallet and was originally published by The Associated Press.

Legal notice of July 8, 2022

July 8, 2022

Montana Mortgages

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NOTICE OF TRUSTEE SALE For cash sale at a Trustee Sale on November 2, 2022 at 2:00 p.m. outside the north entrance of the Lincoln County Courthouse, 512 California Avenue, Libby, MT, the property property described below located in Lincoln County, State of Montana: The properties described below are located in Lincoln County, State of Montana. That part of lots 25, 26, 27 and 28, block 6, West Troy, Montana, in section 12, township 31 north, range 34 west, PMM more particularly described as follows: Commencing at a point on the line north of Second Street 45 feet east of the junction of the said north line of Second Street with the east line of Kalispell Avenue; thence easterly along said second street north line a distance of 42 feet to a point; thence at right angles to Second Street on a line parallel to Kalispell Avenue for 100 feet to the north line of lot 25; thence westerly along the north line of said Lot 25 a distance of 42 feet to a point; thence southerly on a line parallel to said Kalispell Avenue for a distance of 100 feet to the point of commencement, being a rectangular lot or parcel of land 42 feet by 100 feet. More commonly known as 303 N 2nd St, Troy, MT 59935. Frank Kanc and Ronda Kanc, as settlors, conveyed said real property to Milestone Settlement, LLC, as trustee, to secure an obligation due to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Village Capital & Investment, beneficiary of the Deed of Guarantee, its successors and assigns, by Indenture dated August 22, 2020, and filed for record in the records of Clerk and Recorder of Lincoln County, State of Montana, September 1, 2020 under Instrument Number 287600, in Official Records Book 384, Page 465. The value of the Trust Deed has been assigned as follows: Assignee: WILMINGTON SAVINGS FUND SOCIETY, FSB, AS TRUSTEE OF STANWICH MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST M Assignment dated: May 26, 2022 Recorded Assignment: June 10, 2022 Registration Information the assignment: as instrument no. 301190, in Book 397, at page 294, all in the records of the Clerk and Recorder of Lincoln County, Montana Jason J. Henderson is the successor administrator pursuant to a substitution of administrator recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Lincoln County, State of Montana, June 27, 2022 under Instrument Number 301468, in Official Records Book 397, Page 536. The Beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Trust Deed due to the Settlor(s) failing to make monthly payments commencing December 1, 2021 and each month thereafter, which monthly payments would have been applied against the Principal and interest due on said bond and other charges on the property or loan. By reason of said default, the Beneficiary declared immediately due and payable all sums due on the obligation guaranteed by said Deed of Trust. The total amount due on this obligation is the principal amount of $38,486.86, interest in the amount of $923.02, other amounts due and payable in the amount of $374.12 for a total amount due of $39,784.00, plus accrued interest, late fees and other charges and fees that may be incurred or advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be necessary to preserve and protect the property and for property taxes which may become due or past due, unless such tax amounts are paid by the Grantor. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations guaranteed by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of such sale include trustee and attorney fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late fees, if any. The Beneficiary has elected and directed the Trustee to sell the property described above to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and anyone, including the Beneficiary, with the sole exception of the Trustee, can bid at the sale. The auction price must be paid immediately after the auction closes in cash or near cash (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). Transfer will be made by deed of trust, without any representations or warranties, including warranty of title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as is basis, without limitation, the sale is subject to all existing conditions. , if any, lead paint, mold, or other environmental or health hazards. The buyer-seller takes possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in title to the grantor, or any other person having an interest in the property, is entitled, at any time before the sale by the trustee, to pay to the beneficiary, or the successor in title to the beneficiary, the the full amount then due under the indenture and the obligation secured thereunder (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorneys’ fees) other than that part of the principal not then due in the absence of default and in remedying any other default which is the subject of the complaint herein which is capable of being cured by offering the performance required under the obligation or to remedy the default, by paying all the costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and the trust indenture together with the successor trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees. In the event that all defects are corrected, the foreclosure will be rejected and the foreclosure sale will be cancelled. The scheduled trustee sale may be postponed by public proclamation for up to 15 days for any reason. In the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be deferred by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. If the Trustee is unable to pass title for any reason, the winning bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be reimbursement of monies paid to the successor trustee and the winning bidder shall have no further recourse. . This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for this purpose. As of June 28, 2022. Jason J. Henderson Alternate Administrator 38 2nd Avenue East, Dickinson, ND 58601 Telephone: 801-355-2886 Office Hours: Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. MST File No. MT11449 Published in The Western News July 8, 15 and 22, 2022. MNAXLP

MATTHEW J. CUFFE, District Judge 512 California Avenue, Libby, MT 59923 MONTANA NINETEENTH DISTRICT JUDICIAL COURT, LINCOLN COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF LNB, a youth in need of care. Case No. DN-17-16 SUBMITTAL FOR RELEASE TO: KELSI LYNN BENEFIELD YOU HEREBY BE NOTIFIED that a petition has been filed with the above court by the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, Division of Child and Family Services (DPHHS) seeking permanent legal custody, removal of parental rights with right to consent to adoption. NOW, THEREFORE, YOU ARE HEREBY ORDERED to appear on July 25, 2022, at 3:00 p.m., at the Montana Nineteenth Judicial District Court, 512 California Avenue, Libby, Montana, then and there to show evidence, if any you may have, why DPHHS requests for relief should not be granted. The youngster was born on 05/21/2010 in Kalispell, Flathead County, Montana. The youngster’s mother is Kelsi Lynn Benefield. The youngster’s father is Michael Alan Bush II. You have the right to be represented by a lawyer in these proceedings. If you are unable to afford a lawyer, you have the right to ask the court to appoint a lawyer to represent you. Your failure to appear at the hearing constitutes a denial of your interest in the aforementioned child, which denial may result, without further notice of this proceeding or any subsequent proceeding, in default judgment for the relief sought in the petition. A copy of the petition is filed with the Clerk of the Lincoln County District Court, 406-283-2342. WITNESS The Honorable Matthew J. Cuffe, Judge of the aforementioned Court and Seal of this Court, this 7th day of July, 2022. TRICIA BROOKS, Registrar of the District Court By: /s/ Jen Brown Deputy Registrar Published in The Western News July 8, 15 & 22, 2022. MNAXLP

MATTHEW J. CUFFE, District Judge 512 California Avenue, Libby, MT 59923 MONTANA NINETEENTH UDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, LINCOLN COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF XMB, A YOUTH IN NEED OF CARE. Case No. DN-17-17 SUBMITTAL FOR RELEASE TO: KELSI LYNN BENEFIELD YOU HEREBY BE NOTIFIED that a petition has been filed with the above court by the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, Division of Child and Family Services (DPHHS) seeking permanent legal custody, removal of parental rights with right to consent to adoption. NOW, THEREFORE, YOU ARE HEREBY ORDERED to appear on July 25, 2022, at 3:00 p.m., at the Montana Nineteenth Judicial District Court, 512 California Avenue, Libby, Montana, then and there to show evidence, if any you may have, why DPHHS requests for relief should not be granted. The youngster was born on 10/10/2015 in Kalispell, Flathead County, Montana. The youngster’s mother is Kelsi Lynn Benefield. The youngster’s father is Michael Alan Bush II. You have the right to be represented by a lawyer in these proceedings. If you are unable to afford a lawyer, you have the right to ask the court to appoint a lawyer to represent you. Your failure to appear at the hearing constitutes a denial of your interest in the aforementioned child, which denial may result, without further notice of this proceeding or any subsequent proceeding, in default judgment for the relief sought in the petition. A copy of the petition is filed with the Clerk of the Lincoln County District Court, 406-283-2342. WITNESS The Honorable Matthew J. Cuffe, Judge of the aforementioned Court and Seal of this Court, this 7th day of July, 2022. TRICIA BROOKS, Registrar of the District Court By: /s/ Jen Brown Deputy Registrar Published in The Western News July 8, 15 & 22, 2022. MNAXLP

Legal Notice Notice of Intent to Sell the contents of the storage units as listed below on July 16, 2022 at 9:00 a.m., for overdue rent due to Starlite Storage, LLC, 30569 US Hwy 2, Libby: Unit #3 Unit # 4 Unit #10 Unit Unit #15 Unit #22 Unit #64 Unit #82 Published in The Western News July 8-15, 2022. MNAXLP

Critical Comparison: Mission Valley Bancorp (OTCMKTS: MVLY) and Eagle Bancorp Montana (NASDAQ: EBMT)

July 8, 2022

Montana Loans

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Mission Valley Bancorp (OTCMKTS: MVLYGet a rating) and Eagle Bancorp Montana (NASDAQ: EBMTGet a rating) are both small cap finance companies, but which stock is better? We’ll compare the two companies based on their dividend strength, institutional ownership, analyst recommendations, profitability, valuation, earnings and risk.

Benefits and evaluation

This table compares the revenue, earnings per share and valuation of Mission Valley Bancorp and Eagle Bancorp Montana.

Gross revenue Price/sales ratio Net revenue Earnings per share Price/earnings ratio
Mission Valley Bancorp N / A N / A $2.30 million N / A N / A
Eagle Bancorp Montana $97.52 million 1.35 $14.42 million $1.70 11.56

Eagle Bancorp Montana has higher revenues and profits than Mission Valley Bancorp.

Dividends

Mission Valley Bancorp pays an annual dividend of $0.15 per share and has a dividend yield of 1.1%. Eagle Bancorp Montana pays an annual dividend of $0.50 per share and has a dividend yield of 2.5%. Eagle Bancorp Montana pays 29.4% of its earnings as a dividend. Eagle Bancorp Montana has increased its dividend for 11 consecutive years. Eagle Bancorp Montana is clearly the better dividend-paying stock, given its higher yield and longer track record of dividend growth.

Insider and Institutional Ownership

7.2% of Mission Valley Bancorp shares are held by institutional investors. By comparison, 46.9% of Eagle Bancorp Montana’s shares are held by institutional investors. 7.4% of the shares of Eagle Bancorp Montana are held by insiders of the company. Strong institutional ownership indicates that large fund managers, hedge funds, and endowments believe a company is poised for long-term growth.

Risk and Volatility

Mission Valley Bancorp has a beta of 0.55, indicating that its stock price is 45% less volatile than the S&P 500. In comparison, Eagle Bancorp Montana has a beta of 0.64, indicating that its stock price is its stock is 36% less volatile than the S&P 500.

Profitability

This table compares the net margins, return on equity and return on assets of Mission Valley Bancorp and Eagle Bancorp Montana.

Net margins Return on equity return on assets
Mission Valley Bancorp N / A N / A N / A
Eagle Bancorp Montana 12.04% 7.52% 0.80%

Analyst Notes

This is a breakdown of the current ratings of Mission Valley Bancorp and Eagle Bancorp Montana, as provided by MarketBeat.

Sales Ratings Hold odds Buy reviews Strong buy odds Rating
Mission Valley Bancorp 0 0 0 0 N / A
Eagle Bancorp Montana 0 1 0 0 2.00

Eagle Bancorp Montana has a consensus price target of $22.00, suggesting a potential upside of 11.96%. Given Eagle Bancorp Montana’s likely higher upside, analysts clearly believe that Eagle Bancorp Montana is more favorable than Mission Valley Bancorp.

Summary

Eagle Bancorp Montana beats Mission Valley Bancorp on 12 out of 13 factors compared between the two stocks.

About Mission Valley Bancorp (Get a rating)

Mission Valley Bancorp operates as a bank holding company for Mission Valley Bank which provides various personal and corporate banking services. The Company’s deposit products include interest-bearing and non-interest-bearing demand deposits and term deposits; and money market, savings and checking accounts, and certificates of deposit. Its loan portfolio includes personal loans; accounts receivable, apartment, car and truck financing; and commercial real estate, equipment, small business administration and term loans, as well as credit and debit cards, lines of credit and letters of credit. The Company also provides credit card, account reconciliation, cashier’s check, collection, mail deposit, electronic tax payment, overnight deposit, online banking, remote deposit, payroll, safe, tone banking, zero balance accounting and insurance. It operates through two branches located in Sun Valley and Santa Clarita, California. The company was founded in 2001 and is based in Sun Valley, California.

About Eagle Bancorp Montana (Get a rating)

Bancorp Montana Eagle LogoEagle Bancorp Montana, Inc. operates as a bank holding company for Opportunity Bank of Montana, which provides various retail banking products and services to small businesses and individuals in Montana. It accepts various deposit products, such as individual checking, savings, money market and retirement accounts, as well as certificates of deposit accounts. The Company also offers 1 to 4 family residential mortgages, such as residential mortgages and building residential properties; commercial real estate loans, including multi-family dwellings, non-residential property, commercial construction and development, and loans for agricultural land; and second mortgage/equity loans. In addition, it offers consumer loans, such as loans secured by collateral other than real estate, such as automobiles, recreational vehicles and boats; personal loans and lines of credit; commercial business loans consisting of secured and unsecured business loans and lines of credit; building loans; agricultural loans; and mortgage lending services. The company operates 23 full-service branches, 1 community banking office and 25 ATMs. Eagle Bancorp Montana, Inc. was founded in 1922 and is headquartered in Helena, Montana.



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Loan tree data breach, sensitive information potentially leaked in hack • LegalScoops

July 8, 2022

Montana Lending

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On June 29, 2022, Lending Tree, LLC, an online lending marketplace based in Charlotte, North Carolina, reported a data breach to the Montana Attorney General’s office.

According to the company’s data breach notice, between mid-February 2022 and sometime in June 2022, “a code vulnerability likely resulted in the unauthorized disclosure of certain sensitive personal information.”

Lending Tree discovered the “vulnerability” on June 3, 2022. He appears to have started notifying those affected on June 29, 2022.

In its data breach notice loan tree, it is stated that “the vulnerability in the code no longer exists”.

Sensitive personal information that may have been accessed or acquired includes full names, dates of birth, mailing address and social security numbers (SSN).

Lending Tree’s advisory provides no explanation of what it means by “code vulnerability”, how its data was taken or by whom. The media reported that the data is now freely available on the Internet, but, according to this report, Lending Tree denied that the data circulating online came from the company.

The full data breach notice provided to the Attorney General of Montana may be viewed here.

Lending Tree is offering affected individuals two years of free identity monitoring services through IdentityForce. The registration deadline for IdentityForce services is 90 days from the date of the letter.

For a free privacy consultation, fill out the form below or call us at 1-844-BREACH8 (1-844-273-2248).

Special California Laws Protect You

California has laws that specifically protect your personal information.

  • The California Customer Records Act(CCRA) requires businesses to implement and maintain reasonable security procedures and practices to protect consumers’ personal information. Companies must also notify affected California consumers promptly and without unreasonable delay.
  • The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) contains numerous protections for the personal information of California residents, including implementing and maintaining reasonable security procedures.

If certain types of personal information, such as social security numbers and names, are not encrypted and are accessed, stolen, or hacked because a company has failed to meet its obligation to implement and maintain reasonable security concerns, an affected California resident may sue to protect their rights under the CCPA and the CCRA.

If you are a California resident and received a recent data breach notice from Lending Tree, you may be entitled to between $100 and $750 or your actual damages, whichever is greater.

Participants in Data Breach Lawsuits May Obtain Damages, an injunction (to ensure that the company has reasonable security practices in place to prevent further disclosure of consumer data) and any other action the court deems necessary to compensate data breach victims and prevent that this damage does not reoccur.

For free information about your legal right to claim compensation, fill out the form below or call us at 1-844-BREACH8 (1-844-273-2248).

Two years of identity theft services may not be enough

▸ Electronic personal data does not degrade

It’s a sad reality that cybercrimes are an attractive target for hackers: data can be bought and sold anonymously, and the going rate is around $20 per record depending on the type of information, according to the Privacy Affairs Dark Web Index 2021.

Some types of critical personal information — like social security numbers, names, and birth dates — are impossible, or nearly impossible, to change.

Thieves can choose to wait years before capitalizing on compromised personal data. The longer cyber thieves can go unnoticed, the more they profit from their illegal activities.

It pays to know what credit monitoring services can do for you

It is important to understand the benefits and limitations of any spoofing service. Not all credit monitoring and identity theft services offer the same protections or cover the same duration.

Before signing up for a credit monitoring service, here are some helpful questions to ask:

  • Does this service offer dark web monitoring?
  • Does the service monitor the three major credit bureaus on my behalf? (for example, the IdentityForce service described in the data breach notice offers a one-stop credit monitoring bureau)
  • Does the service come with insurance to cover any immediate financial loss I may incur as a result of this data breach? What proof of claim do I need to present? How am I reimbursed?
  • What if I have financial losses after the service expires?
  • Does this service help with fraudulently filed tax returns? Medical identity theft?
  • What exactly will the service do for me if my personal information is sold on the dark web?
  • Can the service prevent fraudulent charges from being made to my credit cards? Will they reimburse me if fraudulent charges are made?

Compromised SSNs can be a complicated problem

  1. A hacker with your SSN can use it to get other personal information about you.
  2. Identity thieves can use your SSN and name to apply for credit under your name. When new credit cards are used by thieves and they don’t pay, it hurts your credit. You may not know about the scam until creditors start contacting you for non-payment of the thief’s bills, or you are denied credit.
  3. Stolen SSNs can be used to fraudulently file taxes, apply for jobs, and receive other government benefits.

“Remember that a new [SSN] probably won’t solve all your problems. This is because other government agencies (such as the IRS and state motor vehicle agencies) and private businesses (such as banks and credit reporting companies) will have records under your old number.

Along with other personal information, credit reporting companies use the number to identify your credit file. So using a new number will not guarantee you a fresh start. This is especially true if your other personal information, such as your name and address, remains the same. » (Social Security Administration Publication No. 05-10064 July 2021.)

Once you know that your personal data has been disclosed, it is reasonable to take steps to avoid fears that your data will be used to cause you significant financial loss.

Compromised data also increases the risk of hacking, phishing, and increased anxiety about future loss and identity theft.

Personal data is extremely valuable, both for businesses and for criminals who want to sell this information on the dark web to identity thieves and other black marketers.

However, “it is clear that many organizations need to hone their security skills, training, practices and procedures to properly protect consumers.”[1] The stakes are high: data breach victims are more likely to also be victims of further fraud.[2]

We can help you exercise your legal rights

Experimented data breach and class action lawyers can help you exercise your rights, assess your options and decide if you are entitled to compensation under the CCPA and the CCRA.

There are no disbursements to you, because we only get paid if we win.

Confidential • Free of charge • No obligation

For free information on your legal right to claim compensation, complete the form below or call us on 1-844-BREACH8 (1-844-273-2248).

Free Privacy Consultation

[1] Source: K. Harris, Former Attorney General, California DOJ, California Data Breach Report 2012-2015 (2016).

[2] Same

Charges of Two Former Spokane Residents Announced by COVID-19 Relief Fraud Strike Force | Local

July 6, 2022

Montana Loans

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SPOKANE — Two new indictments have been announced after investigations by the COVID-19 Relief Fraud Strike Force, launched by the U.S. Attorney’s Office earlier this year. The indictments were recently made public.

On May 3, a federal grand jury returned an indictment charging Natasha Opsal, 40, a former Spokane resident now residing in Great Falls, Montana, with nine counts of fraud in connection with multiple COVID-19 relief loans . The indictment accuses Opsal of fraudulently requesting more than $600,000 through the Paycheck Protection Program and economic disaster loan programs for shell companies, from which it received more than $600,000. $50,000. The indictment was unsealed this week after Opsal was arrested and charged.

On the same day, May 3, a federal grand jury returned an indictment charging Yuriy P. Anishchenko, 34, a former Spokane resident last known to reside in Kent, Washington, with three counts of accusation of fraud in relation to two economic damages. Disaster loans sought and obtained by Anishchenko. The indictment accuses Anishchenko of fraudulently obtaining more than $300,000 for ineligible and ineligible businesses. The fraud charges in both cases carry maximum sentences of up to 20 years in federal prison.

On March 27, 2020, the President signed into law the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (“CARES”) Act. The CARES Act provided a number of programs through which eligible small businesses could apply for and obtain relief funding intended to mitigate the economic impacts of the pandemic for small businesses and local businesses. One such program, the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), provided small businesses with government-backed loans that could be forgiven as long as the proceeds were used for payroll and other qualifying expenses. Another program, the Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) program, provided low-interest loans that could be deferred until the end of the pandemic to provide “bridge” financing to small businesses to maintain their activities during shutdowns and other economic circumstances caused by the pandemic. . The PPP and EIDL programs have provided billions of dollars in aid, the vast majority of which has not been repaid, including hundreds of millions of dollars disbursed in eastern Washington.

“COVID-19 relief programs quickly ran out of money due to the number of people and businesses applying for funding, meaning some deserving small businesses were unable to secure funding to sustain their operations. operating during the COVID-19 pandemic,” U.S. Attorney Waldref said. “We created the COVID-19 Fraud Strike Force because it is critical to the strength and safety of our community in Eastern Washington that we all work together to combat fraud related to the pandemic. The Strike Force is a way to ensure that limited resources are provided to deserving local businesses that provide vital services to our communities. I greatly appreciate the hard work and esprit de corps of so many talented agents and agencies who contribute to our collective efforts.

In February 2022, U.S. Attorney Waldref and the U.S. Attorney’s Office (USAO) began working with federal law enforcement agencies to create and launch a COVID-19 Fraud Strike Force that would leverage partnerships between different agencies to aggressively investigate and prosecute fraud against COVID-19. relief programs in eastern Washington. The strike force is made up of representatives from USAO agencies, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) of the Small Business Administration (SBA), the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the Inspector General of US Treasury Department for Tax Administration (TIGTA), US Secret Service, US Homeland Security Investigations, US Department of Veterans Affairs OIG, General Services Administration OIG, Internal Revenue Service, Department of Energy OIG, and others. Cases investigated and prosecuted by the Strike Force have resulted in numerous indictments, criminal prosecutions and civil penalties, including these two most recent indictments.

“I commend the stellar investigative work on these cases done by Strike Force and in particular by the US Secret Service, SBA, FBI and TIGTA,” US Attorney Waldref said. “We will continue to work with our law enforcement partners to vigorously prosecute those who misuse and misuse COVID-19 relief funds.”

Assistant United States Attorney Dominique Park is suing USA against Anishchenko, while Special Assistant United States Attorney Frieda Zimmerman and Assistant United States Attorney Tyler HL Tornabene are suing USA against Opsal. Both cases were investigated by the COVID-19 Relief Fraud Strike Force.

‘Mat Kilau’ producer admits mistake in not mentioning Finas, Ministry of Communications

July 6, 2022

Montana Lending

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The cast and crew of ‘Mat Kilau: Kebangkitan Pahlawan’ during a press conference. – Photo via Instagram/Filem_matkilau

KUALA LUMPUR (July 6): A dispute has emerged between the National Film Development Corporation Malaysia (Finas) and the makers of popular film Mat Kilau: Kebangkitan Pahlawan.

Finas claimed that there was a breach of an agreement because Studio Kembara (the filmmakers) failed to give proper credit to Finas and the Ministry of Communications and Multimedia in a few media related to the film, the producer of the film now admitting the error.

Abdul Rahman Mt Dali said Berita Harian that the mistake was accidental and reckless.

He admitted that as a newcomer to the local film industry, the company was still not used to handling promotional materials with the credits list.

“It happened because we neglected it. All of our credit-related matters were outsourced to a third party.

“We didn’t know we hadn’t included the Finas logo in the film’s credits until the day of the premiere recently.

“The errors also came from us not properly checking the film before its release,” Abdul Rahman said.

The 62-year-old also said the company had submitted a letter to Finas apologizing for the incident and looking forward to meeting with Finas representatives.

He also said there was no conflict between the two sides

Previously it was reported by Berita Harian that Finas had asked his lawyers to review his credit agreement with Studio Kembara.

According to Finas Managing Director Prof. Mohd Nasir Ibrahim, they found that Studio Kembara had not given the film proper credit as per their agreement.

He said the producers did not include Finas’ logo in their print materials for the film, even though it was stated in the deal.

“Other than that, (our) credits on the film’s credits were only added seven days after Mat Kilau: Kebangkitan Pahlawan was shown in cinemas.

“This is clearly a breach of contract that has already been agreed and corrected by both parties,” he said.

Nasir also pointed out that Finas had provided RM1.5 million through the Digital Content Fund (DKD) to the film producers so that they could revive the RM8 million budget film which was previously scrapped.

“Besides DKD, Finas had also provided them with marketing fund worth RM300,000 in addition to lending our post-production studio to Studio Mixtage, Kompleks Studio Merdeka worth RM180,000 for free,” did he declare.

Nasir added that Finas was surprised when the film’s producers half-heartedly apologized for their breach of contract and even blamed Finas for not telling them about their credit deal.

Apart from this, commenting on Datuk Adi Putra’s performance as a prominent Malay warrior, Mat Kilau, in the film, Nasir said that more holistic research is needed whenever a historical figure is involved in a film. .

“The character, his looks, his accent, his walking style and his silat, everything has to be studied. For example in Gandhi’s film (1982), the actor studied and lived like the character.

“The actor put in all this effort to be able to portray Gandhi as the way Indian citizens see the figure,” Nasir said referring to Sir Ben Kingsley’s acting efforts in the 1982 Hollywood biopic.

Critics had arisen regarding Adi’s portrayal of the title character.

However, Nasir, in a press release shared on Finas’ Facebook page, also took the opportunity to congratulate the success of the film, while emphasizing that the success is proof of the resilience of local films to overcome challenges. of the Covid-19 pandemic.

“We at Finas hope the growing support for this film can spark more interest in other local films.

“We also hope it will encourage local filmmakers to produce more quality works that could penetrate local and international markets,” Nasir said in the press release.

Berita Harian also reported that Mat Kilau: Kebangkitan Pahlawan is now Malaysia’s highest-grossing film after collecting RM51.8 million in ticket sales, beating the previous record holder, 2018’s Munafik 2 which collected RM48 million. RM.

The film Syamsul Yusof is a historical action drama set in the late 19th century during the British administration in Malaysia.

The film stars Datuk Adi Putra as the legendary Malay warrior, Mat Kilau, along with Beto Kusyairi, Fattah Amin, Yayan Ruhan and Johan As’ari as well as Indonesian action star, Yayan Ruhian. – Malaysian Mail






Painful Remedy: Fed Interest Rate Hikes Seem to Slow Workers’ Wage Gains and Calm Housing Markets | national news

July 5, 2022

Montana Mortgages

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Rising interest rates are slowing the housing market as the Federal Reserve focuses on stunting workers’ wages in the fight against high inflation.

Higher rates are making mortgages more expensive and could push a faltering US economy into a recession after first-quarter GDP growth was -1.4%. They also come as tenants of apartments and rental homes face steep rent increases as well as continued inflation in other spending areas such as groceries and gas.

“The housing market is slowing down because you see the high rates having an effect. This should have an effect on house prices, perhaps even fast enough that prices don’t necessarily go down, but price increases flatten out. We see a decline in home sales, a decline in housing starts. We are seeing a slowdown,” Fed Chairman Jerome Powell said during a Senate Banking Committee hearing on Wednesday, June 27.






Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell prepares his papers as he arrives before the Senate Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs Committee, Monetary Policy Report on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, June 22, 2022, in Washington. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)




After dismissing last year’s inflation hike as transitory, the Fed has raised interest rates three times so far this year by a combined 150 basis points.

Powell, whose background is in private equity, stressed the need to limit workers’ wage gains, even if current inflation of 8.6% outpaces wage gains of 4.5% at the end of 2021. Employers have struggled to hire and retain workers throughout the pandemic. The central bank’s inflation objective is to slow wage growth. It worries lawmakers on both sides that rate hikes will lead to job cuts and a recession without reducing the high prices driven by other factors.

“I know higher interest rates are painful, but it’s the tool we have to moderate demand and restore the balance between supply and demand,” Powell said of the US economy facing high inflation, potential recession and central bank pressure against wage gains.

The Fed hopes to bring inflation back into the 2% range from its current rate of 8.6%, the highest since 1981.

Fiscal conservatives have also pressured Powell over large monetary and bipartisan fiscal injections into the economy during the pandemic. US Senator John Kennedy, R-Louisiana, said the federal government had spent an additional $7 trillion on pandemic relief and the Fed’s balance sheet of assets and liabilities fell from $1.5 trillion. dollars to $9 trillion, Kennedy said.

“We pumped all that money into the economy,” Kennedy said during the June 22 hearing.

End of the real estate frenzy

Rate hikes by the US central bank pushed mortgage interest rates from the 3% range to 6%. That’s chilling a housing market that posted robust and at times record levels of sales and price increases during the early stages of the coronavirus pandemic.

It was one of many dichotomies during the pandemic with property investors and wealthy property owners building even more equity and profits while restaurants, bars and other low-wage service workers lost their jobs and their salary.

Now the real estate market is cooling with rising mortgage costs with higher US central bank rates

“The average monthly mortgage payment has increased by more than 40% since the end of last year, due to rising mortgage rates and rising house prices. This affordability shock is pushing many potential buyers out of the market as it has become increasingly difficult to qualify for a mortgage,” said Ali Wolf, chief economist at California-based real estate research firm Zonda.







Mortgage rates

A sign indicating a reduced sale price for a home sits atop a realtor’s sign in Jackson, Mississippi, Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2019. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)




Higher mortgage costs combine with large and ongoing rent increases for apartments and rental homes, impacting many US households.

Land sales — especially in growth markets — are slowing, with builders and developers holding back purchases. Banks, securities firms, builders and real estate developers are also starting to lay off workers as the housing market slows.

The California Association of Realtors reported on June 16 that home sales in May were down 9.8% from April and 15.2% from a year ago. The property group said home sales volumes were at their lowest since June 2020.

The slowdown in sales is also reflected in more homes staying on the market longer. The Florida Realtors group reports a 31.5% increase in inventories of homes for sale compared to last May.

“We actually started to see a change towards the end of the first week of May,” said Jennifer Calenda, broker-owner of Calenda Real Estate Group in Punta Gorda. “We’ve gone from a frenzy to a bit more normal pace here.”

Sharon Neuhofer, president of the Punta Gorda-Port Charlotte-North Port-DeSoto Realtors, said prices have “definitely stabilized, but it’s still a seller’s market.”

She attributed the slowdown in prices to higher interest rates.

“But if a house is priced right, it will sell,” Neuhofer said, adding that if the market isn’t “boiling, it’s simmering.”

High end sales down

Sales of luxury homes are also slowing with higher interest rates and falling US stock markets weighing on wealthy buyers.

Real estate company Redfin reports that sales of luxury homes fell 17.8% between February and April 2022 compared to a year ago. These are the 5% most expensive homes in a given real estate market.

This includes a 27% drop in luxury home sales in Phoenix, a 33% drop in Austin, a 24% sales slowdown in Portland. New York City was the only major U.S. real estate market to see luxury sales growth (30%), according to Seattle-based Redfin.

“The pool of qualified people to buy luxury properties is shrinking because the stock market is down and mortgage rates are rising,” said Elena Fleck, Redfin real estate agent in West Palm Beach, Florida. “The good news for buyers is that the market is leveling out and the competition is easing. Of course, this does not help the dozens of Americans whose price has been completely exceeded.

The median price of a luxury home is $1.15 million nationwide, according to Redfin. These median prices include $5.5 million in San Francisco and $4 million in New York, $2.6 million in Miami, $1 million in Baltimore, and $656,000 in Cleveland.

Recession in sight?

While Powell and US Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen hope for a soft landing in the economy, the current situation and monetary trajectory could mean that consumers are potentially facing high interest rates affecting housing, auto loans and other financing, combined with continued high inflation (including record high gas prices and high grocery prices).

The combination could lead to a slowing economy but persistently high prices – the opposite of a soft landing.

A survey by California-based Freedom Financial Network found that 50% of US consumers would have to use credit cards or borrow money from family and friends if they faced an unexpected expense. $1,000 or more.

A central bank policy aimed at stunting wage growth won’t help consumers worried about gasoline prices of $5 a gallon or more and double-digit increases in the prices of groceries and other goods basic.

It also includes double-digit increases in apartment rents and a dearth of affordable housing options in expensive coastal cities, rural areas and growing markets. The largest rent increases are in Florida markets, according to CoStar Group and its subsidiary Apartments.com.

“More people are living paycheck to paycheck now,” Calenda said.







Federal Reserve Powell

Sen. John Kennedy, R-La., questions Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell during the Senate Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs Committee hearing as he presents the monetary policy report to the committee on Capitol Hill on Wednesday, June 22, 2022, in Washington. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)




An analysis by TransUnion found that apartment rents increased by 14% between 2020 and 2021, but median renter incomes increased by 6%. The median income for an apartment renter is $37,232, according to the credit reporting agency. These income brackets feel the brunt of inflation the most and could also be the hardest hit by higher interest rates.

The median income for apartment renters in 2020 before the COVID pandemic was $35,000, according to TransUnion.

U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren, D-Massachusetts, worries these households will bear the brunt of interest rate hikes, while other drivers of inflation such as industry consolidations and the impact of the Russia’s war in Ukraine and US sanctions will persist.

“The reason I raise this and the reason I’m so concerned about this is that rate increases make it more likely that companies will lay people off and cut hours to reduce labor costs. Rate increases are also making it more expensive for families to do things like borrow money for a home – and so far this year the cost of a mortgage has already doubled,” Warren told Powell. at the June 22 hearing.

Warren worries that the Fed is “tipping this economy into a recession.”

Bread prices plummeted after VAT exemption – The Sofia Globe

July 5, 2022

Montana Economy

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Some retail chains in Bulgaria have cut prices by 20% on all types of bread in all cities where they have stores, the country’s economy ministry said on July 5, saying it had been established by a control that he had commissioned from the Consumer Protection Commission. (CPC) to conduct.

The ministry attributed this to the decision taken in the budget revision, approved by Parliament on June 30, to exempt bread from VAT. The same decision also zero-rated flour for VAT.

The statement said the CPC conducted more than 100 checks in 30 cities at stores of varying sizes between July 2 and July 5.

“It is clear from the CPC protocols that some retail chains have reduced prices by 20% on all types of bread in all cities where they have stores. This is not due to a promotion, as it only happens on certain products for a few days. The current discount is for the entire assortment and it is permanent,” the Ministry of Economy said.

Inspection results showed that in some small grocery stores, prices were close to or even lower than chain prices, the ministry said.

“For example, in a grocery store in Vratsa, 700 g of white bread sells for 1.40 leva and 700 g of typical bread for 1.30 leva. In Montana, in a small store, 700 g of white bread costs 1.60 leva, and Dobrudzha bread costs 1.50 leva”.

The statement quotes Economy Minister and Deputy Prime Minister Kornelia Ninova as saying: “Apparently the abolition of VAT on bread is starting to bear fruit.

“All attempts to challenge this measure or maliciously interpret it as a promotion have failed. It is impossible that hundreds of stores across the country can simultaneously advertise a promotion on all types of bread with the same discount,” said Ninova.

The budget revision was published in the Official Journal, putting into effect the zero rate of VAT on bread and flour.

A state program for a discount of 25 stotinki per liter of gasoline also comes into effect from July 9.

However, it will be up to fuel distribution chains and stations to decide whether or not to participate in the discount scheme.

According to a report by the Bulgarian national radio, the main petrol station chains in Bulgaria have declared that they are ready to offer this discount to their customers, with the discount being deducted after presenting the official car document. The scheme applies to passenger cars registered in Bulgaria and not to company or commercial vehicles.

(Photo: Frances Magee/freeimages.com)

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LendingTree Study finds the pl

July 4, 2022

Montana Mortgages

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Before Father’s Day, the LendingTree study found that there were more than 1.5 million single dads in the United States, and Nevada has the highest prevalence of single fathers in the country

CHARLOTTE, North Carolina, June 14, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — LendingTree®the country’s leading online financial services marketplace, released its study find the places in the United States with the highest rate of single-parent families. While single fathers are nowhere near as prevalent as single mothers, the study found that single fathers make up 4.6% of families where parents live with their children. This translates to over 1.5 million single fathers nationwide. Additionally, the study found that Nevada (6.8%), Montana (6.3%) and Oklahoma (6.1%) are the places where the prevalence of single-parent families is highest.

Main conclusions

  • Single-parent families are the most common in Nevada (6.8%), Montana (6.3%) and Oklahoma (6.1%). These are the only places in the country where single fathers make up more than 6% of families where parents live with their children.
  • In contrast, the states with the fewest single-parent families are Utah (3.6%), New Jersey (3.6%), Massachusetts (3.7%) and New York (3.9%). These are the only places in the country where single-parent families make up less than 4% of families where parents live with their children.
  • Although single fathers still earn more than single mothers, they earn a third less than the average for all families where parents live with their children. The average income of single-parent families is $67,405 — the average income of families whose parents live with their parents is $101,536.
  • Single fathers are generally more educated than cohabiting parents — only 12% of cohabiting fathers have at least a bachelor’s degree, compared to 26% of single fathers.

Here are the top 10 states with the highest prevalence of single parent families:

  1. Nevada – 6.8%
  2. Montana – 6.3%
  3. Oklahoma – 6.1%
  4. New Mexico – 5.8%
  5. Delaware – 5.7% – tied
  6. South Dakota – 5.7% – tied
  7. Wisconsin – 5.7% – tied
  8. Maine – 5.6% – tied
  9. North Dakota – 5.6% – tied
  10. Arizona – 5.5% – tied
  11. Kentucky – 5.5% – tied
  12. Vermont – 5.5% – tied

Chief Credit Analyst at LendingTree, Matt Schulzhad this to add:
“Being a single parent is a monumental task for anyone. While single fathers tend to earn more than single mothers and are even more likely to have a college degree than men living in two-parent households, their job of raising a child on their own is anything but easy.”

For single dads looking to expand their financial freedom, Schulz offers the following advice:

  • Creating and sticking to a budget provides the opportunity to make choices and prioritize what matters, says Schulz. With clearly defined limits and areas of flexibility, a budget makes it easier to prioritize spending, plan for the future, and pay down existing debt.
  • Pay attention to your future expenses. “Feel free to cut some expenses to free up money to fund your priorities,” says Schulz. “Be creative with ways to generate a little more income.”
  • Take action, no matter how small. “Life is at its most stressful when things seem out of our control,” says Schulz. “Taking steps to improve your situation, even the smallest ones, can be uplifting and motivating, and that feeling can carry you forward even on the most difficult days.

To view the full report, go to
https://www.lendingtree.com/debt-consolidation/single-dads-study/

Methodology

LendingTree researchers analyzed microdata from the US Census Bureau 2020 American Community Survey (five-year estimates) to calculate the number of families headed by single men, single women, married couples, and unmarried couples who live with their own children under the age of 18.

For this study, lone parents are people living with their minor children who are neither married nor living with unmarried partners. Married and unmarried partners include same-sex couples.

“Own children” include biological, adopted and stepchildren who are under the age of 18 and unmarried. This study does not include households and institutions where children live without at least one parent.

About LendingTree

LendingTree is the nation’s first online marketplace that connects consumers to the choices they need to be confident in their financial decisions. LendingTree empowers consumers to make smarter financial decisions through choice, education and support. Consumers can compare multiple offers from a nationwide network of over 500 partners in a single search and choose the option that best suits their financial needs. Services include mortgages, mortgage refinances, auto loans, personal loans, business loans, student loans, insurance, credit cards and more. Through the Connect experience, consumers receive free credit scores, credit monitoring, recommendations to improve credit health, and notifications when the proprietary algorithm identifies a savings opportunity. LendingTree, LLC is a subsidiary of LendingTree, Inc. For more information, visit www.lendingtree.com, call 800-555-TREE, like our Facebook page and/or follow us on Twitter @LendingTree.

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Stocks to watch today: RIL, HDFC, Birlasoft, IndiGo, Coal India, IT stocks

July 4, 2022

Montana Lending

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Stocks to watch today: Markets are likely to start trading on a lukewarm note and then look to key index heavyweights for directional movement given the news flow at most counters. At 07:00, SGX Nifty futures were quoted at 15,700, indicating an opening loss of around 50 points.

Meanwhile, the following stocks should see action in trading on Monday.


Metals, Oil producers: The recently announced special tax on exports of steel, iron ore and petroleum products, as well as a windfall tax on crude oil producers are expected to affect overall corporate profits in FY23 Mining and metals and crude oil producers – such as Tata Steel, JSW Steel, Vedanta, Hindalco, ONGC and Reliance Industries – led corporate earnings growth in FY22 and any decline in their earnings due to regulatory changes is likely to lower earnings for FY23. READ THE ANALYSIS


InterGlobe Aviation (IndiGo): More than half of flights operated by IndiGo were delayed on Saturday after a large number of the airline’s cabin crew members called in sick at the last moment, amid a massive recruitment drive by competitors Air India, Jet and Akasa owned by Tata. READ MORE


Reliance Industries (RIL): RIL’s institutional shareholders are awaiting major announcements from the company, including a timetable for the listing of its telecommunications and retail subsidiaries. They expect that to unlock value for the company, which saw a sharp drop in market valuation on Friday. READ MORE


IT inventory: Amid fears of a likely recession in the United States and Europe and rising inflation around the world, first-quarter FY23 results in India’s IT services sector will be closely watched for management comments on demand outlook. With supply-side challenges yet to be resolved, margins will be under pressure due to higher retention costs and shifts. However, the silver lining might be a rupee down. READ THE ANALYSIS


HDFC, HDFC Bank: HDFC’s proposed merger with its banking subsidiary HDFC Bank, the largest transaction in Indian corporate history, has received stock exchange approval. The merger still requires a series of approvals from financial industry regulators, including RBI and CCI, before being passed to NCLT and shareholders. READ MORE


Birlasoft: The company has set July 15 as the record date for the proposed takeover worth Rs 390 crore. The company’s board had approved the buyback of up to 78 lakh shares at Rs 500 each. The stock last traded at Rs 350.


Bharat’s Forge: The auto parts maker and its subsidiary BF Industrial Solutions have successfully completed the acquisition of Coimbatore-based JS Autocast Foundry India. The enterprise value of the transaction was Rs 489.63 crore.


Coal India (CIL): The state-owned company said its coal production rose 29 percent year-on-year to a record 159.8 MT in April-June this fiscal year. CIL supplied an average of 1.684 MT of coal per day to the electricity sector during the June quarter of 2022, compared to a daily requirement of 1.650 MT.


Shriram Transport Funding: Shriram Group is on track for technology integration and merger between Shriram City Union Finance Ltd (SCUF) and


State Bank of India (SBI): The public bank plans to focus more on personal and agricultural gold lending after lending over Rs 1 trillion in this segment till June 2022. The bank’s agricultural gold loan portfolio is rose to Rs 73,601 crore in FY22 from Rs 66,878 crore in FY21. READ MORE


NTPC: The company has informed BSE that its 100 megawatt (MW) floating solar PV project in Telangana is fully operational.

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New York State’s Most Overrated Place

July 3, 2022

Montana Loans

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The calendar finally says it’s summer, which means it’s arguably the best time of year for New York State, although fall is also exceptional for this region, especially from late September to most of October.

Many first-time visitors to New York are almost surprised by the amount of countryside and farmland there is here. They hear “New York” and automatically think of a big city vibe.

Yes, we have big cities, but most of this state is actually like most other states, with beautiful land and water views; The Great Lakes, Finger Lakes, etc.

However, most people who come to New York State usually visit for one reason, and that is to visit New York.

New York is the largest city in the United States. It is absolutely huge and focused on tourists and Hollywood as many movies and TV shows are filmed and/or filmed there.

New York has a glamorous reputation and while it’s a fantastic place to visit (everyone should go at least once), it’s not exactly the most fruitful place to live.

Not because of the sports teams, the food and the culture, but because of the daily tasks that have to be done with logistical nightmares.

New York City is huge, which means it has a very large population. Traffic jams are horrible. It takes a ton of time to get from one part of town to another if you are driving. Many who work in New York commute from Long Island, Pennsylvania or New Jersey, just to avoid living there.

Walking is popular, but again foot traffic is extremely congested. It’s especially not fun in the winter months.

As with most major cities, odor can be an issue, especially in the heat of summer. It can also be expensive and of course the cost of living is astronomically higher than in other parts of the state.

New York has its famous reputation for a reason, but like other big cities, it’s not all sunshine.

The 10 Worst Small Towns in New York [RANKED]

Capital Region City Surpasses Roadsnacks 2022 rankings of the worst small towns in the Empire State. Like any list created by people who don’t live in New York, these rankings in no way reflect what we think of these cities and you should take these rankings with a grain of salt. That said, these rankings were formulated based on census data such as median income, home values, unemployment rates, crime rates, education, and population density. and more in the state’s 466 smallest cities

Is Albany considered upstate New York?

Here’s the latest on what New York has to say about the debate.

WATCH: States with the most new small businesses per capita

Airport Expansion to Accommodate 20+ Years of Growth

July 3, 2022

Montana Economy

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A $115 million expansion project underway at Glacier Park International Airport is an indication of the area’s growing population and popularity as a tourist destination. And while the Covid-19 pandemic has put the effort on hold in 2020, as air travel resumes and visits to the Valley increase again, the project is advancing rapidly.

The priority of airport manager Rob Ratkowski and his team is to create a more efficient space.

“In 2004, we had 160,000 air passengers. This year we will see 450,000. We take this seasonality and summer peak very seriously, and we make it the design standard for the new space. We want the community to have a good setup.

Current complications at the airport include significant congestion and limited seating in the terminal building, which creates a crowded first and last impression of Flathead Valley for passengers, Ratkowski said. Limited aircraft parking and shared gates are causing delays and logistical issues between carriers, and airlines and non-airlines alike have no leeway to increase revenue.

The expansion project is focused on developing the airport’s core infrastructure and growing functional areas to accommodate over 20 years of growth.

“We’re not just looking for more space,” Ratkowski said. “After that, we can do a fast and efficient expansion of the gate. If we need to start a small gate project of 15 to 20 million dollars, we can build it later.

“We want to dramatically improve the passenger experience,” Ratkowski continued. “He will look great and feel great. We will have a full service bar and restaurant, gift shop, cafe and more vehicle and aircraft parking. Everything will be bigger. »

While it’s typical for the summer season to see an influx of passengers, Ratkowski and his team analyzed a new trend last year.

“Last year summer tourism stabilized and we saw huge off-season gains. In fact, our parking lot overflowed on a random weekend in March,” he said.

According to Ratkowski, the increase in the number of off-season plane passengers reveals a shift in the local economy.

“New residents use the airport during the off-season,” he said.

PICTURES OF the new facilities reveal a quintessentially Montana design with elements of stone, wood, steel and glass that allow natural light and mountain views.

The first phase of the project runs from June 2021 to the summer of 2024. The second phase will overlap in the summer of 2023 and will continue until the fall of 2024.

“We are on budget and on schedule. The first phase is 27% complete,” Ratkowski said. “We should be done in the fall of 2024, unless we get another windfall of federal money that will set the project back.”

With the expansion of the airport, airlines now have the ability to add new routes. Glacier Park International airlines include Sun Country, United, Delta, American, Alaska, Allegiant, and Frontier. However, staff shortages and fuel prices continue to cause problems for carriers.

“Oil is expensive and airlines are always scrambling to get pilots back,” Ratkowski said.

JetBlue recently pulled out of Glacier Park International, dropping two flights to New York. Other direct flights, such as to Atlanta and Charlotte, have also been cut. However, Ratkowski sees carriers reassigning planes to historic trade routes, which they believe will create heavy off-season traffic.

Glacier Park International currently ranks second in the state for passenger traffic behind Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport.

“I’m confident our industry will do just fine,” Ratkowski said. “People want to be face to face, and when you need an aircraft, no other tool can satisfy that need.”

Business journalist Summer Zalesky can be reached at [email protected]

Fifth Third Bancorp reduces its equity holdings in M&T Bank Co. (NYSE:MTB)

July 2, 2022

Montana Lending

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Fifth Third Bancorp reduced its stake in M&T Bank Co. (NYSE: MTBGet a rating) by 4.6% in the 1st quarter, according to its last Form 13F filed with the Securities & Exchange Commission. The institutional investor held 37,439 shares of the financial services provider after selling 1,805 shares during the quarter. Fifth Third Bancorp’s holdings in M&T Bank were worth $6,346,000 at the end of the last quarter.

Several other large investors have also recently changed their holdings in the company. Commerce Bank increased its position in M&T Bank shares by 1.2% during the 4th quarter. Commerce Bank now owns 4,979 shares of the financial services provider valued at $765,000 after buying 57 additional shares during the period. Bradley Foster & Sargent Inc. CT increased its position in M&T Bank shares by 2.1% during the fourth quarter. Bradley Foster & Sargent Inc. CT now owns 2,774 shares of the financial services provider valued at $426,000 after purchasing 58 additional shares during the period. Mercer Global Advisors Inc. ADV increased its position in M&T Bank shares by 1.3% during the 4th quarter. Mercer Global Advisors Inc. ADV now owns 4,931 shares of the financial services provider valued at $757,000 after purchasing an additional 62 shares during the period. Kentucky Retirement Systems Insurance Trust Fund increased its position in M&T Bank shares by 1.9% during the 4th quarter. Kentucky Retirement Systems Insurance Trust Fund now owns 3,376 shares of the financial services provider valued at $518,000 after buying 63 additional shares during the period. Finally, Wedbush Securities Inc. increased its position in M&T Bank shares by 3.9% during the 4th quarter. Wedbush Securities Inc. now owns 1,859 shares of the financial services provider valued at $286,000 after purchasing an additional 69 shares during the period. Institutional investors and hedge funds hold 87.61% of the company’s shares.

Separately, Executive Vice President Robert J. Bojdak sold 525 shares of the company in a transaction dated Wednesday, June 8. The stock was sold at an average price of $177.82, for a total transaction of $93,355.50. Following the transaction, the executive vice president now directly owns 19,075 shares of the company, valued at $3,391,916.50. The sale was disclosed in a filing with the Securities & Exchange Commission, available at this hyperlink. Additionally, Vice Chairman Kevin J. Pearson sold 5,000 shares of the company in a trade dated Tuesday, May 17. The shares were sold at an average price of $169.71, for a total value of $848,550.00. Following the transaction, the insider now owns 39,008 shares of the company, valued at $6,620,047.68. Disclosure of this sale can be found here. Insiders sold a total of 7,725 shares of the company valued at $1,335,332 over the past three months. 0.73% of the shares are held by insiders.

Shares of NYSE: MTB opened at $159.71 on Friday. M&T Bank Co. has a fifty-two-week low of $128.46 and a fifty-two-week high of $186.95. The company has a 50-day moving average of $168.99 and a two-hundred-day moving average of $170.33. The stock has a market capitalization of $28.65 billion, a P/E ratio of 12.20, a P/E/G ratio of 0.96 and a beta of 0.86. The company has a debt ratio of 0.21, a current ratio of 1.05 and a quick ratio of 1.05.

M&T Bank (NYSE: MTBGet a rating) last released its quarterly earnings data on Wednesday, April 20. The financial services provider reported earnings per share of $2.73 for the quarter, beating the consensus estimate of $2.26 by $0.47. M&T Bank had a return on equity of 11.45% and a net margin of 29.31%. The company posted revenue of $1.45 billion in the quarter, versus $1.43 billion expected by analysts. In the same quarter of the previous year, the company achieved EPS of $3.41. As a group, research analysts expect M&T Bank Co. to post EPS of 14.11 for the current fiscal year.

The company also recently disclosed a quarterly dividend, which was paid on Thursday, June 30. Investors of record on Wednesday, June 1 received a dividend of $1.20 per share. The ex-dividend date was Tuesday, May 31. This represents an annualized dividend of $4.80 and a dividend yield of 3.01%. M&T Bank’s dividend payout ratio is currently 36.67%.

A number of stock analysts have recently released reports on MTB shares. Deutsche Bank Aktiengesellschaft raised its price target on M&T Bank from $180.00 to $200.00 in a Friday, March 25 report. Robert W. Baird upgraded M&T Bank from a “neutral” rating to an “outperforming” rating and raised its share price target from $175.00 to $200.00 in a Friday, June 17 report. StockNews.com upgraded M&T Bank from a “sell” rating to a “hold” rating in a Friday, June 10 report. JPMorgan Chase & Co. cut its target price on M&T Bank from $200.00 to $195.00 and set a “neutral” rating on the stock in a report released Friday. Finally, Piper Sandler raised her price target on M&T Bank from $200.00 to $210.00 in a Wednesday, April 20 report. Seven equity research analysts gave the stock a hold rating and eight gave the company a buy rating. According to data from MarketBeat.com, the stock has a consensus rating of “Moderate Buy” and a consensus price target of $193.31.

M&T Bank Company Profile (Get a rating)

M&T Bank Corporation operates as a bank holding company that provides commercial and retail banking services. The Company’s Business Banking segment provides deposit, lending, cash management and other financial services to small businesses and professionals. Its Commercial Banking segment provides deposit products, commercial loans and leases, letters of credit and cash management services to medium and large commercial enterprises.

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Institutional ownership by quarter for M&T Bank (NYSE:MTB)



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Shortage of lifeguards Mountain West pools raise wages

July 1, 2022

Montana Economy

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In southern Nevada, Clark County Pools need more than 100 lifeguards. As a result, Aquatic Supervisor Katie Boehme said on average only six out of 16 pools are open with limited hours.

“No one is happy because the water park is not open enough for families with young children, the pool is not open enough for swimmers and we don’t have enough programs,” Boehme said. .

In response, Clark County raised the hourly wage for lifeguards from $9.50 to $13, and the county now pays for new recruits to be trained, which typically costs $120. Boehme said this has helped the aquatics department recruit about 60 people so far.

In Colorado, Governor Jared Polis recently announced The 2022 Swimming Pools Special Initiative to address the shortage of lifeguards. According to Polis, a recent poll found that only 57% of public pools in the state are fully open.

Thanks to this initiative, lifeguards aged 16 and 17 are allowed to work more overtime. The state has also launched a $25,000 grant program that aquatic centers can use to retain and recruit staff. Aspiring lifeguards can earn $1,000 by completing a week of training before being hired.

This story was produced by the Mountain West News Bureau, a collaboration between Wyoming Public Media, Nevada Public Radio, Boise State Public Radio in Idaho, KUNR in Nevada, the O’Connor Center for the Rocky Mountain West in Montana , KUNC in Colorado, KUNM in New Mexico, with support from affiliate stations throughout the region. Funding for the Mountain West News Bureau is provided in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

Community leaders hope to raise $10 million for workforce housing in Bozeman

July 1, 2022

Montana Loans

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The housing crisis in Bozeman is a problem that community leaders have been trying to solve for years. Now, with the creation of a new community fund, they hope it will provide solutions to a crisis that has challenged area residents.

“I don’t want to live in a community that’s a… where it’s just a resort community for the super-rich. It’s not what Bozeman is, it’s not our roots, it’s not where we want to be,” Bozeman Deputy Mayor Terry Cunningham said.

Cunningham says it’s hard to see house prices continue to soar.

“It’s frustrating for the city because we have so few tools to get the workforce housing projects off the ground,” Cunningham said.

With this new fund goal of $10 million, leaders are beginning to see light at the end of the tunnel.

“Housing prices got away from us a bit, rent affordability a bit, so we started talking a bit more about an investment fund that would help solve some of the problems that we are having,” said the President. and CEO of First Security Bank, Jim Ness.

For Ness, housing affordability is an issue his employees struggle with. This is one of the reasons why the bank is committed to contributing the first million dollars to the fund.

“As I talk to my employees and hear some of their situations, I hear things like having 3 roommates, 4 roommates, 6 roommates, maybe sharing a room with someone. I think the quality life is a challenge,” says Ness.

This is what inspired Ness to approach Deputy Mayor Cunningham with the idea of ​​collaborating and creating a discovery aimed at tackling housing affordability in the Gallatin Valley.

The fund aims to help workforce housing projects get started and provide funds to fill the funding gap. Part of the fund will also help to obtain home loans. Leaders hope this investment in the community will inspire more people to put down roots in the Gallatin Valley.

“Private businesses, bankers and other community partners are stepping up and contributing to this fund, sends a great message to the community that we’re in this together,” Cunningham said.

They say a healthy workforce is the foundation of a city like Bozeman.

“If we don’t have an active workforce and I believe workforce housing is a barrier to that right now and I want to help and address that,” Ness said.

Even with all the construction, Ness says a piece of the puzzle is missing.

“There’s a lot of construction going on in Bozeman right now and there’s a lot of apartments going on, which is great, and there’s a need for that too, but the area I see for that need is for this category of affordability,” he said.

Ness and Cunningham are optimistic about mobilizing community support to tackle a community-wide issue.

“It’s definitely not the silver bullet that’s going to do it, but I think it’s part of the solution,” Ness said.

Legal notice of July 1, 2022

July 1, 2022

Montana Mortgages

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NOTICE OF TRUSTEE SALE For cash sale at a Trustee Sale on October 19, 2022 at 2:00 p.m. outside the North Entrance of the Lincoln County Courthouse, 512 California Avenue, Libby, MT, the property described below located in Lincoln County, State of Montana: Tract I: Lots 12A and Lots 13-15 of Block 2 of the Amended Plate of Remp Addition, as per the plate thereof filed in the office of the Clerk and Recorder, Lincoln County, Montana. Tract II: Lots 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, and the west 62 feet of lot 22 and the north 9 feet of the east 65 feet of lot 22 of block 2 of Remp Addition, according to the flat of the latter on file in the office of the Lincoln County Clerk and Recorder, Montana. More commonly known as 208 N Colorado Ave, Libby, MT 59923. Steven W. Cannon, as grantor, conveyed said real property to Lincoln County Title Company, as trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as named nominee for Glacier Bank, beneficiary of the security instrument, its successors and assigns, by trust deed dated August 15, 2017, and filed for record in the records of the Clerk and Recorder of Lincoln County, State of Montana, on August 23, 2017 under Instrument Number 270280, in Book 368, Page 870, Official Records. The Indenture has been assigned for value as follows: Assignee: Truist Bank Assignment dated: September 15, 2021 Registered Assignment: September 21, 2021 Assignment Registration Information: as Instrument No. 296073, in the book 392, at page 467 All in the Records of the Clerk and Recorder of Lincoln County, Montana Jason J. Henderson is the successor administrator pursuant to a substitution of administrator recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Lincoln County, State of Montana, on May 11, 2022 as Instrument No. 300624, in Book 396, at page 762, of the Official Records. The Beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust due to the Settlor(s) failing to make monthly payments commencing on May 1, 2021 and each month thereafter, which monthly payments would have been applied against Principal and interest due on said bond and other charges on the property or loan. By reason of said default, the Beneficiary declared immediately due and payable all sums due on the obligation guaranteed by said Deed of Trust. The total amount due on this bond is principal of $117,952.64, interest in the amount of $6,246.79, escrow advances of $3,581.59, other amounts due and payable in the amount of $510.24 for a total amount due of $128,291.26, plus accrued interest, late fees, and other fees and costs that may be incurred or advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be necessary to preserve and protect the property and for property taxes which may become due or past due, unless such tax amounts are paid by the Grantor. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations guaranteed by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of such sale include trustee and attorney fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late fees, if any. The Beneficiary has elected and directed the Trustee to sell the property described above to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and anyone, including the Beneficiary, with the sole exception of the Trustee, can bid at the sale. The auction price must be paid immediately after the auction closes in cash or near cash (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). Transfer will be made by deed of trust, without any representations or warranties, including warranty of title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as is basis, without limitation, the sale is subject to all existing conditions. , if any, lead paint, mold, or other environmental or health hazards. The buyer-seller takes possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in title to the grantor, or any other person having an interest in the property, is entitled, at any time before the sale by the trustee, to pay to the beneficiary, or the successor in title to the beneficiary, the the full amount then due under the indenture and the obligation secured thereunder (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorneys’ fees) other than that part of the principal not then due in the absence of default and in remedying any other default which is the subject of the complaint herein which is capable of being cured by offering the performance required under the obligation or to remedy the default, by paying all the costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and the trust indenture together with the successor trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees. In the event that all defects are corrected, the foreclosure will be rejected and the foreclosure sale will be cancelled. The scheduled trustee sale may be postponed by public proclamation for up to 15 days for any reason. In the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be deferred by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. If the Trustee is unable to pass title for any reason, the winning bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be reimbursement of monies paid to the successor trustee and the winning bidder shall have no further recourse. . This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for this purpose. Dated June 8, 2022. Jason J. Henderson Alternate Administrator 38 2nd Avenue East Dickinson, ND 58601 Phone: 801-355-2886 Office Hours: Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. MST File No. MT11447 Posted in The Western News June 17, 24 and July 1, 2022. MNAXLP

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE SALE For cash sale at a trustee sale on October 24, 2022 at 2:00 p.m. outside the north door steps of the Lincoln County Courthouse located at 512 California Avenue, Libby, MT 59923, the property described below located in Lincoln County, State of Montana: Lots 15 and 16 of Block 4, East Libby, according to the plate thereof on file in the office of the Clerk and Recorder , Lincoln County, Montana. Except right of way to J. Neils Lumber Company by deed recorded in Book 101 at page 375, Records of Lincoln County, Montana. More commonly known as 722 1/2 East 6th Street, Libby, MT 59923. Earl O. Stevens Jr. and Ada P. Westlake, as licensors, conveyed said real property to First American Title Insurance Company, in as trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as appointed agent for Guild Mortgage Company LLC f/k/a Guild Mortgage Company, a California corporation, beneficiary of the deed of guarantee, its successors and assigns, by deed of trust dated January 27, 2020, and filed for recording in the records of the County Clerk and Recorder of the County of Lincoln, State of Montana, on January 31, 2020 under instrument number 283894, in the book 380, at page 999, official documents. The Trust Deed has been assigned for value as follows: Assignee: Guild Mortgage Company LLC Assignment dated: March 15, 2022 Recorded Assignment: March 25, 2022 Assignment Registration Information: as Instrument No. 299792, in Book 395, at page 962, All in the Records of the Clerk and Recorder of Lincoln County, Montana Jason J. Henderson is the successor administrator pursuant to a substitution of administrator recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of the County of Lincoln, State of Montana, April 20, 2022 as Instrument No. 300300, in Book 396, Page 455, Official Records. The Beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Trust Deed due to the Settlor(s) failing to make monthly payments commencing March 1, 2020 and each month thereafter, which monthly payments would have been applied against Principal and interest due on said bond and other charges on the property or loan. By reason of said default, the Beneficiary declared immediately due and payable all sums due on the obligation guaranteed by said Deed of Trust. The total amount due on this obligation is the principal amount of $80,000.00, interest in the amount of $7,404.60 and other amounts due and payable in the amount of $6,627.80 for a total amount owed of $94,032.40, plus accrued interest, late fees and other charges. and the costs that may be incurred or advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be necessary to preserve and protect the property and for property taxes which may become due or past due, unless such tax amounts are paid by the Grantor. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations guaranteed by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of such sale include trustee and attorney fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late fees, if any. The Beneficiary has elected and directed the Trustee to sell the property described above to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and anyone, including the Beneficiary, with the sole exception of the Trustee, can bid at the sale. The auction price must be paid immediately after the auction closes in cash or near cash (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). Transfer will be made by deed of trust, without any representations or warranties, including warranty of title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as is basis, without limitation, the sale is subject to all existing conditions. , if any, lead paint, mold, or other environmental or health hazards. The buyer-seller takes possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in title to the grantor, or any other person having an interest in the property, is entitled, at any time before the sale by the trustee, to pay to the beneficiary, or the successor in title to the beneficiary, the the full amount then due under the indenture and the obligation secured thereunder (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorneys’ fees) other than that part of the principal not then due in the absence of default and in remedying any other default which is the subject of the complaint herein which is capable of being cured by offering the performance required under the obligation or to remedy the default, by paying all the costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and the trust indenture together with the successor trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees. In the event that all defects are corrected, the foreclosure will be rejected and the foreclosure sale will be cancelled. The scheduled trustee sale may be postponed by public proclamation for up to 15 days for any reason. In the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be deferred by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. If the Trustee is unable to pass title for any reason, the winning bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be reimbursement of monies paid to the successor trustee and the winning bidder shall have no further recourse. This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for this purpose. As of June 10, 2022. Jason J. Henderson Alternate Administrator 38 2nd Avenue East, Dickinson, ND 58601 Telephone: 801-355-2886 Office Hours: Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. MST File No. MT11317 Published in The Western News June 17, 24 and July 1, 2022. MNAXLP

Metal Tiger plc UK Regulatory Announcement: Sandfire – 147 Mt of Mineral Resources provide solid foundation for MATSA’s long-term optimization and growth

June 30, 2022

Montana Lending

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LONDON–(BUSINESS WIRE)–

June 30, 2022

Metal Tiger plc

(“Metal Tiger” or the “Company”)

Sandfire – 147Mt Mineral Resource lays solid foundation for MATSA’s long-term optimization and growth

Metal Tiger plc (AIM: MTR, ASX: MTR), the AIM and ASX listed investor in natural resource opportunities, is pleased to announce that Sandfire Resources Ltd (“Sandfire”) has published an updated estimate of the Measured, Indicated and Inferred Mineral Resources for the MATSA mining operations, located in the Iberian Pyrite Belt in southern Spain, totaling 147.2 Mt grading 1.4% Cu, 3.0% Zn, 1.0% Pb and 39.6 g/t Ag containing approximately 2.1 Mt copper, 4.4 Mt zinc, 1.5 Mt lead and 187.6Moz silver.

Metal Tiger is interested in 7,087,057 Sandfire shares representing approximately 1.72% of the issued share capital of Sandfire. As previously announced, 2,842,667 of the Sandfire shares held by the Company are subject to an equity derivative financing agreement with a global investment bank.

A link to Sandfire’s MATSA Copper Operations site visit information pack, released today, is shown below:

https://cdn-api.markitdigital.com/apiman-gateway/ASX/asx-research/1.0/file/2924-02536902-6A1097705?access_token=83ff96335c2d45a094df02a206a39ff4

A link to the Sandfire release, announced today, is shown below:

https://cdn-api.markitdigital.com/apiman-gateway/ASX/asx-research/1.0/file/2924-02536659-6A1097631?access_token=83ff96335c2d45a094df02a206a39ff4

For more information about the Company, visit www.metaltigerplc.com:

Michel McNeilly

(Chief executive officer)

Tel: +44 (0)20 3287 5349

Mark Potier

(Investment Director)

James Dance

James Harris

charlie hammond

Strand Hanson Limited (appointed adviser)

Tel +44 (0)20 7409 3494

Steve Douglas

Simon Johnson

Arden Partners plc (Broker)

Tel: +44 (0)20 7614 5900

Gordon Pool

James Crothers

Rebecca Waterworth

Camarco (financial PR)

Tel: +44 (0)20 3757 4980

Notes to editors:

Metal Tiger PLC is listed on the AIM Market of the London Stock Exchange AIM Market (“AIM”) and the ASX Market of the Australian Securities Exchange Market (“ASX”) with the trading code MTR and invests in mining projects high potential with a focus on base, precious and strategic metals.

The Company’s objective is to provide a high return to shareholders by investing in largely undervalued and/or high potential opportunities in the mining exploration and development sector.

Equity investments invests in undervalued natural resource companies. The majority of its investments are listed on AIM, TSX and ASX, including its stake in Sandfire Resources Limited (ASX:SFR). The Company also considers selective opportunities to invest in private natural resource companies, generally where there is an identifiable path to IPO.

The Company actively evaluates new investment opportunities on an ongoing basis and has access to a diversified portfolio of new opportunities in the natural resources and mining sectors. For pipeline opportunities deemed sufficiently attractive, Metal Tiger may invest in the project or entity by purchasing publicly traded equity, private financing and/or entering into a joint venture.

Category Code: MSCU

Sequence number: 918519

Received time (offset from UTC): 20220630T091517+0100

PrimeLending® Announces Michael Heeb (NMLS: 470225) as New Area Manager in the Pacific Northwest Region

June 29, 2022

Montana Loans

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BOISE, Idaho–(BUSINESS WIRE)–National residential lender PrimeLending, a PlainsCapital company, announces the promotion of Michael Heeb to regional manager in the Pacific Northwest, overseeing Alaska, Idaho and Montana.

Michael brings 20 years of experience in the mortgage industry to his new role after 7 years as a Branch Manager at the Eagle, ID branch and its 7 satellite branches, including Bozeman, MT.

Currently Area Manager in the Pacific Northwest region of PrimeLending, Michael will work with community residents on purchasing and refinancing needed mortgages in the Alaska, Idaho and Montana regions. .

Michael worked hard to earn this leadership opportunity. He has demonstrated his ability to lead even when it is difficult. Michael has played an impressive role in our growth in Idaho and Montana. He is a true servant leader who leads with conviction. These skills are exactly what we need to advance our business in key western markets,said Al Velasco, director of PrimeLending’s EVP West division.

About PrimeLending

PrimeLending, a PlainsCapital company (PrimeLending), is a national real estate lender combining personal advice and local expertise with fast service, more choice and the flexibility to meet the unique needs of homeowners. We relentlessly strive to empower our clients to boldly pursue their homeownership goals, whether they are looking to buy, refinance or remodel a home. The PrimeLending team works alongside our clients in all 50 states, helping them make smart home financing decisions and a rewarding experience along the way. Keeping this promise for over 30 years, we’re proud to consistently achieve a 97% customer satisfaction rate*. PrimeLending is a wholly owned subsidiary of PlainsCapital Bank, which in turn is a wholly owned subsidiary of Hilltop Holdings Inc. (NYSE: HTH). More information at PrimeLending.com. Equal Housing Lender.

*Survey administered and managed by an independent third party after loan closing. The 97% satisfaction rating refers to the average rating that our clients gave to our loan officers for the period from 01/01/21 to 31/12/21.

All loans subject to credit approval. Rates and fees subject to change. Mortgage financing provided by PrimeLending, a PlainsCapital company. Equal Housing Lender.

©2022 PrimeLending, a PlainsCapital company. (NMLS: 13649).

Climate change discussion scheduled for Thursday in Columbia Falls

June 29, 2022

Montana Economy

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A roundtable on climate change is scheduled for Thursday in Columbia Falls.

The event is coordinated by the Flathead County Democratic Central Committee, features local experts and advocates in the search for climate change solutions.

It takes place at 6 p.m. at Glacier Lanes, 307 Nucleus Ave.

Representatives from Climate Smart Glacier Country, Citizens’ Climate Lobby, Wild Montana and Our Children’s Trust will be led in the conversation by former Montana State Representative Debo Powers, President of Wild Montana.

“Our planet is getting warmer, and it’s starting to affect our enjoyment of life, our economy, and the natural world around us,” Powers said. “This is the greatest threat facing us and our children and grandchildren, yet our society continues to operate as usual, leaving us frozen in despair.”

“The best antidote to despair is hope and action,” adds Powers. “We still have time to make changes that will mitigate the effects of climate change.”

Climate Smart Glacier Country strives to engage the public in finding local solutions to climate-created challenges to water and food security, public health, and recreation.

Citizens’ Climate Lobby works on national policies by building relationships with elected officials and local media in 580 chapters around the world.

Wild Montana helps communities thrive by building trust, fostering collaboration, and reaching agreements to protect nature, address climate change, and improve access to public lands.

Our Children’s Trust works to ensure young people’s legal rights to a healthy atmosphere and safe climate, based on the best available science.

FCDCC President Lynn Stanley said this and previous events were organized to shed light and stimulate conversation and solutions to some of the most critical issues facing Montana people and local community leaders.

“Solving these problems requires the participation of citizens, Democrats and Republicans, libertarians and independents, all working together,” she said.

The event is free and open to the public.

Participants will have the opportunity to pose questions to the panelists after a one-hour moderated discussion.

It’s always a vendor’s market in Chicagoland

June 28, 2022

Montana Mortgages

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With the data compiled from late spring, one thing is clear: this is still a seller’s market. Across the state of Illinois, homes sold faster in May 2022, year over year. Although interest rates rose slightly, demand remained strong.

In May, a total of 16,194 homes were sold statewide, according to Illinois REALTORS®. And while the number reflects a 10.1% year-over-year decline, that’s mostly due to lack of inventory. Year over year, the number of homes for sale fell 24.4% to 21,718 homes. Reflecting the tight competition, the median price also rose 6.2% to $276,000.

“Now is a great time to sell your home,” Illinois REALTORS® President Ezekiel “Zeke” Morris said in a press release. “The average Illinois home spent just over three weeks on the market in May, and some properties are attracting multiple offers from potential buyers.” The average Illinois home spent 24 days on the market in May, nine days less than a year ago.

Statistics from the Chicago Association of REALTORS® (CAR) revealed that 3,335 properties were sold in the city proper in May 2022: 3.4% less than in May 2021. And although the days on the market decreased by 23.6%, at 55 days on average, the median sale price remained the same as last year: $350,000.

In the Chicago metro area, however, home sales fell at a more drastic rate of 10.6%. A total of 11,641 homes were sold in the area in May, but the price increase was slightly less pronounced – 5.5% – bringing the metro median to $327,000. The average days on market in Chicagoland also fell 19.2% to 21 days in May.

“Clearly, we’re in an extreme seller’s market with historically low inventory and strong buyer demand,” said John Gormley, CEO of the Mainstreet Association of REALTORS®, reflecting on the data from suburban Chicago. “If a seller is ready, now is the time to list.”

According to Mainstreet, the suburbs that saw the biggest declines were, in order: Vernon Hills (down 89.3%), Sugar Grove (down 89.1%), Addison (down 84 .5%), Antioch (down 79.5%), Western Springs (down 72.6%), Western Springs (down 72.6%), Hinsdale (down 70%), Lemont (down 66.7%), Homewood (down 62.1%), Mt. Prospect (down 60.7%), Oak Forest (down 56.6%). ), Naperville (-56.4%) and Schaumburg (-45.8%).

New figures from the North Shore-Barrington Association of REALTORS® (NSBAR) paint a similar picture. As inventory continued to decline in the North Shore-Barrington area — new listings fell 21% — prices rose further. The median sale price in this zone is now $565,000, reflecting a 7.6% year-over-year increase to $565,000. And, with average days on the market falling to 38 days, an NSBAR statement notes that sellers have been encouraged.

“Buyers face fierce competition and don’t have the luxury of stalling,” Mainstreet President John LeTourneau said. Especially since mortgage rates continue to rise. “The longer you wait, the more expensive it is likely to be,” Gormley added. “Over a 30-year mortgage, there are still great financial advantages to buying a home, even in this market.”

Combined with inflationary fears, home sales should now rebound over the next few months. Daniel McMillen, head of the Stuart Handler Real Estate Department (SHDRE), voiced this SHDRE prediction in the Illinois REALTORS® press release. “Foreclosures have decreased significantly since the same period last year,” he said. “Inflation continues to be a concern for consumers, particularly among high-income households, and interest rates are expected to rise this summer.”

CAR President Antje Gehrken echoed this sentiment. “Despite rising mortgage rates and a significant drop in inventory, buyer activity remains elevated, as evidenced by the continued decline in days on market and the slight rise in median selling prices,” he said. she declared. “The market continues to slowly return to pre-pandemic behavior and normalize after a breakneck pace.”

IBM Retirement Fund holds $348,000 position in M&T Bank Co. (NYSE:MTB)

June 28, 2022

Montana Lending

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IBM Retirement Fund reduced its position in shares of M&T Bank Co. (NYSE: MTBGet a rating) by 3.8% in the first quarter, HoldingsChannel.com reports. The company held 2,055 shares of the financial services provider after selling 81 shares during the quarter. IBM Retirement Fund’s holdings in M&T Bank were worth $348,000 at the end of the last quarter.

Other institutional investors have also recently increased or reduced their stake in the company. Yousif Capital Management LLC acquired a new stake in shares of M&T Bank during the fourth quarter at a value of $3,343,000. UMB Bank NA MO acquired a new position in M&T Bank in the fourth quarter worth $49,000. NuWave Investment Management LLC acquired a new position in M&T Bank in the first quarter worth $47,000. Thrivent Financial for Lutherans increased its stake in M&T Bank by 7,874.3% in the fourth quarter. Thrivent Financial for Lutherans now owns 450,790 shares of the financial services provider valued at $69,233,000 after purchasing an additional 445,137 shares during the period. Finally, Desjardins International Asset Management Inc. acquired a new position in M&T Bank in the fourth quarter worth $1,831,000. Hedge funds and other institutional investors own 87.61% of the company’s shares.

Separately, Executive Vice President Robert J. Bojdak sold 525 shares of the company in a trade on Wednesday, June 8. The shares were sold at an average price of $177.82, for a total transaction of $93,355.50. Following the completion of the transaction, the executive vice president now directly owns 19,075 shares of the company, valued at approximately $3,391,916.50. The transaction was disclosed in a document filed with the Securities & Exchange Commission, accessible via the SEC website. Additionally, Executive Vice President Christopher E. Kay sold 2,200 shares in a trade on Friday, June 3. The stock was sold at an average price of $178.83, for a total value of $393,426.00. Following the completion of the sale, the executive vice president now owns 5,350 shares of the company, valued at approximately $956,740.50. Disclosure of this sale can be found here. Insiders sold a total of 7,725 shares of the company worth $1,335,332 in the past 90 days. 0.73% of the shares are currently held by insiders.

MTB opened at $164.42 on Tuesday. The company has a quick ratio of 1.05, a current ratio of 1.05 and a debt ratio of 0.21. The stock has a market capitalization of $29.50 billion, a price-earnings ratio of 12.56, a PEG ratio of 0.96 and a beta of 0.86. M&T Bank Co. has a 12-month low of $128.46 and a 12-month high of $186.95. The company’s 50-day moving average price is $169.87 and its two-hundred-day moving average price is $170.28.

M&T Bank (NYSE: MTBGet a rating) last reported results on Wednesday, April 20. The financial services provider reported earnings per share of $2.73 for the quarter, beating analyst consensus estimates of $2.26 by $0.47. The company posted revenue of $1.45 billion for the quarter, compared to $1.43 billion for analysts. M&T Bank posted a net margin of 29.31% and a return on equity of 11.45%. In the same period a year earlier, the company earned earnings per share of $3.41. As a group, sell-side analysts expect M&T Bank Co. to post earnings per share of 14.11 for the current year.

The company also recently declared a quarterly dividend, which will be paid on Thursday, June 30. Investors of record on Wednesday, June 1 will receive a dividend of $1.20 per share. This represents a dividend of $4.80 on an annualized basis and a dividend yield of 2.92%. The ex-dividend date is Tuesday, May 31. M&T Bank’s payout ratio is currently 36.67%.

Several stock analysts have recently released reports on the stock. Wedbush raised its price target on M&T Bank shares from $187.00 to $212.00 in a Thursday, April 21 report. Robert W. Baird upgraded M&T Bank shares from a “neutral” rating to an “outperforming” rating and raised his target price for the company from $175.00 to $200.00 in a Friday, June 17 report . Piper Sandler raised her price target on M&T Bank shares from $200.00 to $210.00 in a Wednesday, April 20 report. StockNews.com upgraded M&T Bank shares from a “sell” rating to a “hold” rating in a Friday, June 10 report. Finally, Wells Fargo & Company raised its price target on M&T Bank shares from $180.00 to $195.00 and gave the company an “equal weight” rating in a Thursday, April 21 report. Seven investment analysts gave the stock a hold rating and eight gave the stock a buy rating. Based on data from MarketBeat.com, the company has a consensus rating of “Moderate Buy” and a consensus target price of $194.62.

M&T Bank Profile (Get a rating)

M&T Bank Corporation operates as a bank holding company that provides commercial and retail banking services. The Company’s Business Banking segment provides deposit, lending, cash management and other financial services to small businesses and professionals. Its Commercial Banking segment provides deposit products, commercial loans and leases, letters of credit and cash management services to medium and large commercial enterprises.

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Want to see which other hedge funds hold MTB? Visit HoldingsChannel.com to get the latest 13F deposits and insider trades for M&T Bank Co. (NYSE: MTBGet a rating).

Institutional ownership by quarter for M&T Bank (NYSE:MTB)



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End of the Yappy hour? Ruff times for the Wonder Bar in Asbury Park

June 27, 2022

Montana Economy

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A long tradition of loving dog owners in the Asbury Park area seems to be coming to an end. Yappy Hour may not be anymore.

On Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays from April to November, on the large terrace and the beach of the Wonder Bar, people are invited to bring their cockapoo (or any other breed) while sipping a cocktail. Yappy Hour is normally 4-7pm, as are many human-only happy hours.

This has been going on for over a decade. That’s over 70 dog years! It raises money for local animal rescues, and director Debbie DeLisa tells NJ.com it also brings the community together.

“We would like to continue this camaraderie by being able to welcome them into a beautiful and safe environment for both the puppies and the people,” she said.

Chances are it’s all going down the drain due to a construction project that may take up the land they need to run Yappy Hour. A residential complex is in sight and the planning shows no impact on the Wonder Bar building itself, but it would eliminate its terrace and much of the sandy area they need to bring in their canine customers.

The developer says it tries to work with Wonder Bar to minimize any impact. Something that could take their deck away from them doesn’t seem like a small thing.

For the loyal doggies of Asbury Park, don’t lose hope. It is only in the phase of the land use approval process and nothing final has been decided. The project would take about two years.

The opinions expressed in the above post are those of New Jersey 101.5 talk show host Jeff Deminski only.

You can now listen to Deminski & Doyle — On demand! Listen to New Jersey’s favorite radio show every day of the week. Download the Deminski & Doyle show wherever you get podcasts, on our free app, or listen now.

Click here to contact an editor about a comment or correction for this story.

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Local musician brings bullfighting to Clarksville with Bulls, Booms, and Burgers event

June 27, 2022

Montana Mortgages

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CLARKSVILLE, TN (NOW CLARKSVILLE) – Local musician Daniel Walker runs the Walker Farm & Ranch off Parchman Road. On Saturday, he hosted the second annual “Bulls, Booms, and Burgers.”

The event started with a Tannerite bang, followed by live music, live bull riding and the first ever freestyle bullfighting event in Clarksville.

Walker told Clarksville Now that while he knows there are concerns about the humane treatment of the bulls, he encourages anyone who cares about their quality of life to come to his ranch.

“We love these animals as much as we love rodeo,” Walker said. “They live a life of luxury, they are fed 15 pounds of feed a day, not including hay, and they are pampered.”

Walker brought in professional bull riders for this event, including cowboy protection bulls, which protect bulls from bulls once they have fallen. These cowboys came from every state, Walker said, including places like Kentucky, Illinois, Ohio and Louisiana. Even with the free bullfighting event, Walker said these animals would not be harmed.

“It’s very interesting, it’s like dancing, they’re trying to keep that bull engaged on them.”

Walker said he hopes more people enjoy next year.

President of M&T Bank Corporation – GuruFocus.com

June 26, 2022

Montana Lending

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BUFFALO, NY, June 16, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Richard (“Rich”) Goldpresident and chief operating officer of M&T Bank Corporation (NYSE: MTB), announced his intention to retire, effective in the first quarter of 2023. Gold plans to remain on the board of directors of M&T Bank.

“It’s hard to overstate Rich’s impact on our business,” said Rene Jones, president and CEO of M&T. “It has been his life’s work to instill and perpetuate a culture that we are all proud of, a culture that allows us to function with a sense of purpose and to feel that we are part of something bigger. This focus on culture, coupled with an acute ability to identify and cultivate leaders, has provided us with an exceptional talent base to pursue our purpose and continue to make a difference in people’s lives.”

After joining the bank in 1989, Gold held senior positions in retail banking, corporate banking, mortgages, consumer loans and marketing. In 2014, he was named Vice President and assumed the role of Chief Risk Officer. In 2017, he was named president and chief operating officer, the culmination of a five-decade career in which the bank has grown exponentially, expanding its footprint to include 12 states and the District of Colombia.

Prior to joining M&T, Gold held positions in cash management and operations at Bankers Trust Company, and in marketing and product development at Citibank. He obtained a Bachelor of Science from Cornell University School of Industrial and Labor Relations and a Masters in Business Administration from New York University Stern School of Business.

Gold has long been committed to supporting both the Western New York community and the banking sector in general. He currently sits on the boards of the Westminster Foundation, the Buffalo Niagara Partnership and the Consumer Bankers Association, and has previously served on the boards of the United Way of Buffalo and Erie County, Shea’s Performing Arts Center and Buffalo Seminary. He also serves on the Dean’s Advisory Council at the University at Buffalo School of Management, where he is an Adjunct Professor, teaching Organizational Behavior Management.

About M&T

M&T Bank Corporation is a financial holding company headquartered in Buffalo, New York. M&T’s principal banking subsidiary, M&T Bank, provides banking products and services in 12 states in the northeastern United States, from Maine at Virginia and washington d.c. Trust-related services are provided in certain markets in the United States and abroad by affiliates of M&T’s Wilmington Trust and M&T Bank. For more information about M&T Bank, visit www.mtb.com.

Media Contact:
Maya Dillon
(646) 735-1958
[email protected]

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SOURCE M&T Bank Corporation

After Kelly Clarkson finally got her ranch back from ex Brandon Blackstock, he found an expensive new Bachelor Pad

June 24, 2022

Montana Mortgages

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Could the Montana ranch drama finally be over for Kelly Clarkson? Although her ex-husband, Brandon Blackstock, left the property in early June, when their divorce settlement required, the musical director would have continued to be “a thorn in the side” and reportedly even considered continuing to fight Clarkson for the ranch in court. However, Reba McEntire’s stepson has now found a new bachelor pad, so perhaps the family can start closing down.

Brandon Blackstock’s new digs were reportedly purchased on April 18, according to a transfer deed obtained after the fact by We Weekly, but it’s unclear when, or even if, Blackstock moved in. The 4,800 square foot home in Butte, Montana was listed at $1.8 million, although the actual purchase price was not reported. While Kelly Clarkson’s ex-husband surely ended up paying a pretty penny for the new estate, the 4-bedroom, 2.5-bathroom home is still a notable downgrade from the Montana ranch, which the american idol champion purchased in 2019 for $10.4 million.

The registration on Berkshire Hathaway HomeService website reports Brandon Blackstock’s home features large windows to capture panoramic views, a chef’s kitchen with a pantry and wine fridge, an outdoor kitchen, a steam room, three wells, a shop, a barn with a loft , a greenhouse and a three-car garage. (What, no pool? Although I suppose there is are three wells.)

The home sits on over 40 acres of land in a seemingly “very private” setting, and as Brandon Blackstock recently renamed his cattle ranching business from Vintage Valley Ranch (his former home) to V Bar V Cattle Co. , it would appear that he is taking steps to further limit his time in the entertainment industry continue farming full time. Blackstock received all of the couple’s cattle in the divorce settlement.

Although Kelly Clarkson and Brandon Blackstock’s divorce was filled with controversy over everything from their Business affairs at custody of their two children to their prenup, it was the ranch in Montana that seemed to cause the biggest headache. Although Clarkson wanted to sell the property, which was costing $81,000 a month in mortgage, taxes and insurance, she was not allowed to deport her exwho had maintained his residence there and did not have the financial means to move.

It was agreed that Kelly Clarkson would pay Brandon Blackstock a tax-free one-time payment in the amount of $1,326,161, in addition to 5.12% of the value of the ranch (approximately $908,000) and $115,000 in monthly alimony. But the drama continued, even in the weeks leading up to the future rancher’s moving day, as he filed papers in court demanding that his ex-wife turn off the property’s 13 security cameras while still living there, and to show evidence of how this was accomplished.

As The Kelly Clarkson Show the host prepares to revamp his daytime talk showShe decided take the summer spend with her two children, apparently with some of that time planned for fun at the Montana ranch. Now that Brandon Blackstock has his own place, maybe everyone can really start moving forward.

Check your local listings to see when The Kelly Clarkson Show is playing in your area, and even if she is officially out for season 22 of The voicecould we see her back in the Big Red Chairs for season 23? You can also check out the other shows that will be airing soon on our TV program 2022.

Economic Benefit of Montana’s National Parks

June 24, 2022

Montana Economy

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A new report from the National Park Service shows that more than five million visitors in 2021 spent more than $720 million in Montana’s national parks. According to the National Park Service press release, tourist spending has generated more than $1 billion in the state’s economy and more than 11,000 jobs.

The peer-reviewed study by economists from the US Geological Survey and the National Park Service shows that more than 200 million national park tourists have spent more than $20 billion in gateway communities about 60 miles east. exterior of a national park. Visitor spending has helped support more than 300,000 people nationwide, half of them in nearby communities. Accommodation and restaurants in national parks were the biggest spenders for visitors.

Here is a list of national parks in Montana:

  • Glacier National Park
  • Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail
  • Nez Perce National Historical Park
  • Little Bighorn National Monument
  • yellowstone national park
  • Ice Age Flood National Geologic Trail
  • Big Hole National Battlefield
  • Grant-Kohrs Ranch National Historic Site
  • Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area
  • Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site

Follow this link to learn more about all of Montana’s national parks and how the state, along with the National Park Service, is working to preserve these historic sites and maintain environmental conservation.

That’s what the average Montana household pays in bills every month | State

June 24, 2022

Montana Loans

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The cost of living in the United States is much lower than the cost of living in several other developed countries, including the Nordic countries as well as New Zealand and Australia. Yet living expenses in the United States are higher than in most countries in the world.

According a recent study by Doxoa bill payment platform, US households spend an average of $2,003 per month on the most common bills, or about 37% of what a typical household earns in a month.

The average monthly cost of those bills — which include rent, car loans, utilities, car insurance, cable, Internet, cell phone and health insurance — is lower than average in Montana. The typical Montana household spends an average of $1,751 per month on bills, the 15th lowest among the 50 states.

States with higher-than-average monthly bills also tend to have higher-than-average incomes, while cheaper states tend to have lower incomes — and Montana is no exception. The typical household in the state earns $56,539 a year, compared to the national median household income of $64,994, according to five-year estimates from the US Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

Rank State Avg. monthly household bills ($) Median household income ($) Avg. bill total as a percentage of revenue (%)
1 Hawaii 2,911 83 173 42.0
2 California 2,649 78,672 40.4
3 New Jersey 2,610 85,245 36.7
4 Massachusetts 2,511 84,385 35.7
5 Maryland 2,456 87,063 33.9
6 Connecticut 2,380 79,855 35.8
seven New York 2,361 71 117 39.8
8 Alaska 2,334 77,790 36.0
9 Washington 2,277 77,006 35.5
ten New Hampshire 2,256 77,923 34.7
11 Colorado 2,251 75,231 35.9
12 Virginia 2,229 76,398 35.0
13 Rhode Island 2,172 70,305 37.1
14 Oregon 2,070 65,667 37.8
15 Delaware 2,057 69 110 35.7
16 Illinois 2,029 68,428 35.6
17 Wyoming 2,022 65,304 37.2
18 Florida 1,993 57,703 41.4
19 Minnesota 1,967 73,382 32.2
20 Texas 1,956 63,826 36.8
21 Nevada 1,945 62,043 37.6
22 North Dakota 1,937 65,315 35.6
23 Arizona 1,936 61,529 37.8
24 Maine 1,922 59,489 38.8
25 Wisconsin 1,915 63,293 36.3
26 Utah 1,910 74 197 30.9
27 Vermont 1,883 63,477 35.6
28 Georgia 1,875 61,224 36.8
29 Louisiana 1,871 50,800 44.2
30 Pennsylvania 1,851 63,627 34.9
31 North Carolina 1,829 56,642 38.7
32 Iowa 1,784 61,836 34.6
33 Caroline from the south 1,783 54,864 39.0
34 Idaho 1,777 58,915 36.2
35 Michigan 1,754 59,234 35.5
36 Montana 1,751 56,539 37.2
37 Tennessee 1,734 54,833 37.9
38 Kansas 1,720 61,091 33.8
39 Ohio 1,717 58 116 35.5
40 Missouri 1,706 57,290 35.7
41 Nebraska 1,696 63,015 32.3
42 Alabama 1,688 52,035 38.9
43 New Mexico 1,663 51,243 38.9
44 South Dakota 1,654 59,896 33.1
45 Oklahoma 1,634 53,840 36.4
46 Kentucky 1,627 52,238 37.4
47 Indiana 1,607 58,235 33.1
48 Mississippi 1,559 46,511 40.2
49 Arkansas 1,552 49,475 37.6
50 West Virginia 1,452 48,037 36.3

NuWave Investment Management LLC takes $47,000 position in M&T Bank Co. (NYSE: MTB)

June 24, 2022

Montana Lending

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NuWave Investment Management LLC has purchased a new stake in the shares of M&T Bank Co. (NYSE: MTBGet a rating) during the first quarter, according to its most recent 13F filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The company bought 279 shares of the financial services provider, valued at around $47,000.

Several other large investors also bought and sold shares of MTB. CVA Family Office LLC acquired a new stake in M&T Bank stock during Q4 valued at approximately $31,000. Widmann Financial Services Inc. acquired a new stake in M&T Bank in Q4 worth approximately $37,000. UMB Bank NA MO acquired a new stake in M&T Bank in Q4 worth approximately $49,000. Lindbrook Capital LLC increased its holdings in M&T Bank by 39.2% in the fourth quarter. Lindbrook Capital LLC now owns 355 shares of the financial services provider worth $55,000 after buying an additional 100 shares in the last quarter. Finally, Covestor Ltd acquired a new stake in M&T Bank in Q4 worth approximately $55,000. Hedge funds and other institutional investors own 87.61% of the company’s shares.

Several equity research analysts have recently released reports on MTB shares. Goldman Sachs Group raised its price target on M&T Bank from $183.00 to $210.00 and gave the stock a “neutral” rating in a Monday, April 4 report. Wolfe Research lowered its price target on M&T Bank from $214.00 to $187.00 and set an “outperform” rating on the stock in a Thursday, May 26 report. JPMorgan Chase & Co. launched a hedge on M&T Bank in a Thursday, April 14 report. They issued a “neutral” rating on the title. Citigroup launched coverage on M&T Bank shares in a research note on Thursday, March 24. They issued a “buy” rating on the stock. To finish, StockNews.com upgraded M&T Bank shares from a “sell” to a “hold” rating in a Friday, June 10 research note. Seven research analysts have rated the stock with a hold rating and eight have assigned the stock a buy rating. According to MarketBeat.com, the stock currently has a consensus rating of “Moderate Buy” and a consensus price target of $194.62.

MTB stock opened at $159.64 on Friday. The company has a market capitalization of $28.64 billion, a PE ratio of 12.20, a PEG ratio of 0.95 and a beta of 0.86. The company has a debt ratio of 0.21, a quick ratio of 1.05 and a current ratio of 1.05. The company’s 50-day moving average price is $169.63 and its 200-day moving average price is $169.84. M&T Bank Co. has a one-year low of $128.46 and a one-year high of $186.95.

M&T Bank (NYSE: MTBGet a rating) last released its quarterly results on Wednesday, April 20. The financial services provider reported EPS of $2.73 for the quarter, beating the consensus estimate of $2.26 by $0.47. The company posted revenue of $1.45 billion for the quarter, compared to analysts’ estimates of $1.43 billion. M&T Bank posted a net margin of 29.31% and a return on equity of 11.45%. In the same quarter of the previous year, the company achieved EPS of $3.41. Equity research analysts expect M&T Bank Co. to post EPS of 14.11 for the current fiscal year.

The company also recently announced a quarterly dividend, which will be paid on Thursday, June 30. Shareholders of record on Wednesday, June 1 will receive a dividend of $1.20. This represents a dividend of $4.80 on an annualized basis and a yield of 3.01%. The ex-dividend date is Tuesday, May 31. M&T Bank’s payout ratio is 36.67%.

In other M&T Bank news, Vice Chairman Kevin J. Pearson sold 5,000 shares of the company in a trade that took place on Tuesday, May 17. The stock was sold at an average price of $169.71, for a total value of $848,550.00. Following the sale, the insider now owns 39,008 shares of the company, valued at $6,620,047.68. The sale was disclosed in a filing with the SEC, accessible via the SEC website. Also, VPE Robert J. Bojdak sold 525 shares of the company in a transaction that took place on Wednesday, June 8. The shares were sold at an average price of $177.82, for a total value of $93,355.50. Following the completion of the sale, the executive vice president now directly owns 19,075 shares of the company, valued at approximately $3,391,916.50. Disclosure of this sale can be found here. In the past three months, insiders have sold 7,725 shares of the company worth $1,335,332. 0.73% of the shares are held by insiders.

M&T Bank Profile (Get a rating)

M&T Bank Corporation operates as a bank holding company that provides commercial and retail banking services. The Company’s Business Banking segment provides deposit, lending, cash management and other financial services to small businesses and professionals. Its Commercial Banking segment provides deposit products, commercial loans and leases, letters of credit and cash management services to medium and large commercial enterprises.

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Want to see which other hedge funds hold MTB? Visit HoldingsChannel.com to get the latest 13F deposits and insider trades for M&T Bank Co. (NYSE: MTBGet a rating).

Institutional ownership by quarter for M&T Bank (NYSE:MTB)



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Sen. Ellsworth: Responding to Montana’s Economic Challenges and Opportunities | Columnists

June 22, 2022

Montana Economy

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SEN. JASON ELLSWORTH

As we begin to approach the 2023 legislative session, workers, families, employers and elected officials in Montana are all facing a unique combination of opportunities and challenges that we have never seen before.

In many ways, Montana’s economy is better than ever. Governor Greg Gianforte recently announced that our unemployment rate remains at an all-time high as more Montanese are working than ever before. The Treasure State’s economy and personal income are growing at the fastest rates in 40 and 15 years, respectively.

This success, along with our status as a freedom-loving state and vast open spaces, has spurred interest in Montana – as a place to start a business, raise a family, retire and buy property. The cost of owning or renting a home has skyrocketed as demand has outstripped supply. The massive inflation created by reckless federal spending and the shortage of workers to fill all the job vacancies are greatly compounding our economic challenges.

As a state, we cannot completely overcome national and international trends on things like inflation, labor shortages, or the possibility of an impending recession. But what we can do at the legislative level comes down to three main categories: reduce costs where possible, enable innovation and protect what we already have.

People also read…

Reducing costs and enabling innovation includes removing red tape that holds back entrepreneurs in Montana, like when we removed barriers to telehealth and direct-to-patient healthcare providers in the last legislative session. Next session, we’ll look at unnecessary housing regulations that drive up the cost of building and buying a home, as well as reducing property taxes. Governor Gianforte’s administration has also embarked on a multi-year effort to cut red tape, and I’m excited to see what proposals his team is putting forward.

Enabling innovation and upward mobility also means both preparing the next generation and making Montana competitive for business. We took many steps in the right direction last year, including passing legislation to increase teachers’ starting salaries, encourage vocational and technical education, reduce taxes on business equipment, and reduce and simplify income taxes. Sen. Steve Daines, Governor Gianforte and business leaders touted these and other reforms at the recent “Montana on the Rise” economic summit.

Going forward, we must build on these early reforms and significant investments. The Legislative Assembly recently brought together all of the major constitutional players in our public education system around one table to discuss next steps to better prepare Montana students for their future careers. We are also in the midst of a historic investment in high-speed internet to bridge the digital divide, give rural communities a fairer footing, and create opportunity in every corner of Big Sky Country. Additionally, Montana’s potential to produce abundant and cheap energy should be unleashed.

Finally, we must protect what makes Montana the last best place, including our traditional values ​​and the rights and freedoms we hold dear. It also means retaining and increasing public access to the great outdoors, like the Legislative Assembly’s investments in the Lower Yellowstone and Somers Beach public access projects last year.

In the 2021 legislative session, we created a solid foundation that is already driving job creation and wage growth. In the 2023 session, I hope Democrats will join us in building on this foundation to continue to make the most of Montana’s opportunities and address the challenges we face. We all recognize these challenges. To deal with it, Republicans will put in place policies to reduce costs, enable innovation and protect what we cherish about Montana. These solutions should have appeal across the political spectrum.

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Powell says recession is ‘a possibility’ but unlikely

June 22, 2022

Montana Mortgages

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Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said the central bank was determined to regain control of inflation, although he acknowledged the Fed had little power to treat its most visible symptoms at the pump. petrol or the supermarket.

Powell addressed the Senate Banking Committee on Wednesday, a week after the Fed ordered the biggest interest rate hike since 1994. The central bank is under increasing pressure to fight inflation, which has reached a four-decade high of 8.6% in May.

“We need to bring inflation down to 2%,” Powell told lawmakers. “We are using our tools to do that. And the public should believe that we will bring inflation down to 2% over time.”

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., has warned that a sharp rise in borrowing costs could lead to increased layoffs, while doing nothing to unravel the supply shocks that have driven up the price of oil. gasoline and groceries.

“You know what’s worse than high inflation and low unemployment?” said Warren. “It’s high inflation and a recession with millions out of work. I hope you reconsider that before you knock this economy off a cliff.”

Powell stressed that the economy was well positioned to withstand higher interest rates, although he acknowledged that the war in Ukraine and ongoing supply chain problems increased the risk of an economic slowdown. .

“It’s definitely a possibility,” Powell said. “It’s not our expected outcome at all, but it’s certainly a possibility.”

“We are not trying to cause – and do not think we will need to cause – a recession,” he added. “But we think it’s absolutely essential to restore price stability, really for the benefit of the labor market as much as anything else.”

A growing number of forecasters are now seeing storm clouds on the horizon. Economists interviewed by the the wall street journal put the odds of a recession over the next 12 months at 44%, down from 28% in April.

Powell argued that forecasting recessions is notoriously difficult, but added that he does not see the risk as particularly high.

“The US economy for now is strong. Spending is strong. Consumers are in good shape. Businesses are in good shape,” Powell said. “Monetary policy is notoriously a blunt tool. And there is a risk that weaker outcomes are certainly possible. But that is not our intention.”

After keeping interest rates near zero for the first two years of the pandemic, the Fed is now taking aggressive action to raise borrowing costs in an effort to reduce demand. The Fed’s benchmark rate jumped to 1.6%, and more rate hikes are expected in the coming months.

Mortgage rates have risen sharply in anticipation of the Fed’s actions, and this is starting to weigh on both home sales and home construction.

Some Republicans on the committee blamed the Fed for waiting too long to quell inflation and blamed the $1.9 trillion relief bill passed by congressional Democrats last year for fueling consumer demand.

“The Federal Reserve and this administration have let the American people down by ignoring these warnings a year ago and not acting sooner to respond to them,” said Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Ala.

Powell and other officials admitted that they initially misjudged both the severity and the resilience of inflation. But the Fed Chairman insists he is determined to get prices under control.

“We have the tools, the determination and hopefully the judgment to accomplish this task,” Powell said.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To learn more, visit https://www.npr.org.

How Marriage Rates Have Changed in Montana | State and Region

June 22, 2022

Montana Loans

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Marriage rates in the United States have been declining for several decades. giggster look at Centers for Disaster Control and Prevention Montana marriage rate data, you can read the national story here.

Cultural critics and many sociologists have lamented the decline in marriage rates, citing concern over the deterioration of the traditional family structure and what it might mean for raising children. A more holistic look suggests many factors for variations in marriage rates– from women earning more equity in the workplace and on their paychecks to the normal fluctuations occurring around major historical events, such as tight rates during the Great Depression and a doubling of marriage rates in the United States. United at the end of World War II.

Southern states maintain higher marriage rates on average than Northeastern states; while Montana is the only state that has seen an increase in marriage rates since 1990. Keep reading to find out why this might be the case and find out other key insights into how marriage rates have changed over the past few years. decades.

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There are no obvious common denominators between the states with the highest and lowest marriage rates. States with the lowest marriage rates, such as California, have cities where the cost of living tends to be high, which may be a factor in lower marriage rates. Financial insecurity and lack of savings are often quoted as reasons why couples are reluctant to marry. Yet Louisiana also has a low marriage rate, despite being in a region that is more affordable and generally known for its more traditional views on marriage and family than cities like San Francisco and Los Angeles.

Montana’s high marriage rate likely has little in common with Nevada’s, given that Nevada is likely due in part to its reputation as the capital of speedy marriages. Couples can enter a chapel and get married in a 10-minute ceremony, or even via a passage tunnel. Of course, this can also be the reason why Nevada also leads the nation in divorces.


giggster


– Marriage rate 2020: 10.4 per 1,000

— #2 highest among all states

– Evolution of the marriage rate since 1990: 1.8

There are no obvious common denominators between the states with the highest and lowest marriage rates. States with the lowest marriage rates, such as California, have cities where the cost of living tends to be high, which may be a factor in lower marriage rates. Financial insecurity and lack of savings are often quoted as reasons why couples are reluctant to marry. Yet Louisiana also has a low marriage rate, despite being in a region that is more affordable and generally known for its more traditional views on marriage and family than cities like San Francisco and Los Angeles.

Montana’s high marriage rate likely has little in common with Nevada’s, given that Nevada is likely due in part to its reputation as the capital of speedy marriages. Couples can enter a chapel and get married in a 10-minute ceremony, or even via a passage tunnel. Of course, this can also be the reason why Nevada also leads the nation in divorces.

States with the highest marriage rates (per 1,000)

States with Lowest Marriage Rates (per 1,000)

There’s no single reason why marriage rates in the United States are at their lowest level since 1867, but history does contain a clue as to why it might be. Historically, periods of economic crisis, such as the Great Depression of the 1930s, announced a drop in marriage rates. The millennial cohort that might normally marry is now of working age in the midst of a major recession.

In addition to historic levels of student debt and stagnating wages, many young people in their 20s and 30s today may simply not feel like they can afford to. settle down for now. A third of survey respondents in a December 2019 YouGov study commissioned by LendKey Technologies said they had or would consider waiting to get married until they had paid off their student loans.

States where marriage rates fell the most from 1990 to 2020 (per 1,000)

#2. South Carolina: -10.2

Senator Jason Ellsworth: Addressing Montana’s Economic Challenges and Opportunities | Columnists

June 21, 2022

Montana Economy

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SEN. JASON ELLSWORTH

As we begin to approach the 2023 legislative session, workers, families, employers and elected officials in Montana are all facing a unique combination of opportunities and challenges that we have never seen before.

In many ways, Montana’s economy is better than ever. Governor Greg Gianforte recently announced that our unemployment rate remains at an all-time high as more Montanese are working than ever before. The Treasure State’s economy and personal income are growing at the fastest rates in 40 and 15 years, respectively.

This success, along with our status as a freedom-loving state and vast open spaces, has spurred interest in Montana – as a place to start a business, raise a family, retire and buy property. The cost of owning or renting a home has skyrocketed as demand outstripped supply. The massive inflation created by reckless federal spending and the shortage of workers to fill all the job vacancies are greatly compounding our economic challenges.

As a state, we cannot completely overcome national and international trends on things like inflation, labor shortages, or the possibility of an impending recession. But what we can do legislatively comes down to three broad categories: reduce costs where possible, enable innovation, and protect what we already have.

People also read…

Reducing costs and enabling innovation includes removing red tape that holds back entrepreneurs in Montana, like when we removed barriers to telehealth and direct-to-patient healthcare providers in the last legislative session. Next session, we’ll look at unnecessary housing regulations that drive up the cost of building and buying a home, as well as reducing property taxes. Governor Gianforte’s administration has also embarked on a multi-year effort to cut red tape, and I’m excited to see what proposals his team is putting forward.

Enabling innovation and upward mobility also means both preparing the next generation and making Montana competitive for business. We took many steps in the right direction last year, including passing legislation to increase teachers’ starting salaries, encourage vocational and technical education, reduce taxes on business equipment, and reduce and simplify income taxes. Sen. Steve Daines, Governor Gianforte and business leaders touted these and other reforms at the recent “Montana on the Rise” economic summit.

Going forward, we must build on these early reforms and significant investments. The Legislature recently brought together all of the major constitutional players in our public education system around the same table to discuss next steps to better prepare Montana students for their future careers. We are also in the midst of a historic investment in high-speed internet to bridge the digital divide, give rural communities a fairer footing, and create opportunity in every corner of Big Sky Country. Additionally, Montana’s potential to produce abundant and cheap energy should be unleashed.

Finally, we must protect what makes Montana the last best place, including our traditional values ​​and the rights and freedoms we hold dear. It also means retaining and increasing public access to the great outdoors, like the Legislative Assembly’s investments in the Lower Yellowstone and Somers Beach public access projects last year.

In the 2021 legislative session, we created a solid foundation that is already driving job creation and wage growth.

In the 2023 session, I hope Democrats will join us in building on this foundation to continue to make the most of Montana’s opportunities and address the challenges we face. We all recognize these challenges. To deal with it, Republicans will put in place policies to reduce costs, enable innovation and protect what we cherish about Montana. These solutions should have appeal across the political spectrum.

Senator Jason Ellsworth, R-Hamilton, is president pro tempore of the Montana Senate. This column was originally published as part of the Frontier Institute’s “Legislative Viewpoint” series.

Zinke Campaign Misses Financial Disclosure Deadline Again | 406 Politics

June 20, 2022

Montana Mortgages

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GOP congressional candidate Ryan Zinke has yet to file his updated financial disclosure report, after missing the deadline by more than a month.

His Democratic opponent for the new US West District in Montana, Missoula attorney Monica Tranel, filed the required documents last month. It was due May 16. Its financial disclosure shows slight increases in its assets and salaries compared to its previous report, filed last November.

Zinke, a former congressman who earlier this month won a close primary race to become the Republican nominee, also missed the previous financial disclosure deadline. His campaign filed the report later that month following media requests.

Campaign spokeswoman Heather Swift said last week that the campaign plans to submit its 2022 financial disclosure report on Monday.

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“Lost track of the deadline,” Swift said in a text message last week.

On Monday, Swift noted that Congress was closed for the federal recess — since Juneteenth fell on Sunday — when asked if the campaign still plans to file Zinke’s 2022 financial disclosure. She did not respond to questions. requests for a copy of the report.

Tranel’s financial disclosure report, filed May 19 with the U.S. House Clerk’s Office, shows its 2022 revenue was between $199,000 and $260,000 last year. Candidates declare their income, assets and liabilities within wide ranges.

His reported assets consist entirely of joint investments, primarily in stocks and mutual funds. They totaled between $2.7 million and $6.5 million. Tranel’s sole liability, a mortgage with Bank of America, was between $500,000 and $1 million.

Zinke’s previous disclosure listed assets between $8 million and $34 million. His earnings for 2020 were between $900,000 and $1 million, mostly from consulting work.

Announcement of Native American Journalism Fellows

June 20, 2022

Montana Loans

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Seven students have been selected by the Native American Journalists Association (NAJA) to participate in the Native American Journalism Fellowship (NAJF). Each of these students is currently enrolled in colleges and universities across the country.

This class of 2022 scholars will be able to participate in a virtual program while receiving three hours of college credit at their respective universities. There are five mentors that students will work closely with throughout the duration of this scholarship. Each of these five mentors represents four different branches of journalism: broadcast, radio, print and digital media.

Students will have the opportunity to pitch stories to news outlets and will also have the opportunity to participate in the National Indigenous Media Conference where they can meet and network with other Indigenous journalists.

The NAJF Class of 2022

Lyric Aquino (Tewa) – New York University

Grace Benally (Navajo) – Arizona State University

Valentin Contreras (Pala Band of Mission Indians and IIPAY Nation of Santa Ysabel)

California State University

Carrie Lynn Johnson (Chickasaw and Pawnee) – Austin College

McKayla Lee (Navajo) – University of Montana

Lindsay McCoy (Sault Ste Marie Tribe of Chippewa) – Michigan State University

Priscilla Wolf (Cree) – University of Regina

More stories like this

A tour around Haskell and an engaging tour with Rep Christina Haswood
Ojibwe educator, Illinois Indigenous organization, awarded $50,000 to continue social justice work
American Indian College Fund plans virtual conference for Indigenous students and educators
It’s graduation season. This inevitably means that Indigenous students will face resistance if they wear cultural insignia during ceremonies.

About the Author

Neely Bardwell
Author: Neely BardwellE-mail: This email address is protected from spam. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Neely Bardwell (descendant of the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indian), who started as an intern at Native News Online in the summer of 2021, is a freelance writer. Bardwell is a student at Michigan State University where she majored in politics and minored in Native American studies.


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New developments aim to ease Bozeman’s affordable housing crisis

June 20, 2022

Montana Lending

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The Perennial Park development recently opened behind Lowe’s just off North 19th Ave. (Frank Eltman/MTFP)

BOZEMAN — The first time Anna Stone met “Randy” in 2019, he was sleeping under a bridge. She recalled that he seemed to have psychological problems and was not interested in help from a stranger. Their introduction did not go well.

They met again in May 2020 when Stone, the housing case coordinator at the Human Resources Development Council, found him at a hotel for people over 65 who might be vulnerable to COVID-19.

“Randy,” who didn’t want his full name used for this story, slowly built a relationship of trust with Stone, who for two years worked with him to transition from homelessness.

Il sera bientôt le dernier résident à emménager dans un nouveau lotissement de 96 logements fondés sur le revenu pour adultes de plus de 55 ans appelé Perennial Park. This is the last effort of those responsible to put at least a small breach in the emerging problem of affordable housing in the region.

“Knowing that last summer he was sleeping on the floor in Lindley Park and that this summer he’s going to be in an air-conditioned room with [donated]

Depuis fin avril, des camions de déménagement déchargent les affaires des nouveaux arrivants au parc Perennial, situé derrière Lowe’s juste à côté de la 19e avenue nord à Bozeman. It is part of a larger development which includes the adjacent Arrowleaf project of 136 units, which is oriented towards families.

Also on the property are what turned out to be two key components of the $69 million project needed for Seattle-based developer GMD Development to comply with city zoning regulations.

The Community Health Partners building at the entrance to the property will provide medical, dental and mental health clinics, as well as a pharmacy, to residents of the Bozeman area. On the other side, Family Promise offers early childhood learning.

Residents of Perennial Park and Arrowleaf must meet income criteria below 60% of the region’s median income: $41,760 for an individual and $59,640 for a family of four.

In a city where one-bedroom apartments typically rent for nearly $2,000, eligible residents of Perennial Park apartments pay $1,119 for a one-bedroom apartment; $1,342 for two bedrooms; and $1,551 for a three-bedroom, said HRDC associate director Tracy Menuez.

Menuez said the people who need affordable housing the most are “the people who feed Bozeman.” Elle a noté que la plus récente évaluation régionale des besoins en logement a déterminé que le comté de Gallatin avait besoin de 6 000 unités supplémentaires.

“If you want to go out to dinner, they work in the restaurant. If you want to go to the house supplies store, it is the people who work at the counter, working the floor, “she said. “My God, these are the people who teach your children.”

In addition to access to childcare and health services, the development is within walking distance of a supermarket and other retail outlets and restaurants along a busy stretch of 19th Avenue. .

“J’adore ça”, a déclaré Bonnie Budd, une brigadière scolaire à la retraite et sauveteuse qui déplaçait ses affaires d’un camion U-Haul un matin récent. “New people are moving in and I can’t wait to have a whole new life.”

Bozeman Deputy Mayor Terry Cunningham said the development was made possible through the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development’s low-income tax credit scheme. Le programme fournit des subventions fédérales aux promoteurs en échange d’une garantie qu’ils maintiendront les loyers en dessous de 60% du revenu médian de la région.

He also recognized an acute need for affordable housing in Bozeman.

“Chaque jour, vous entendez des histoires de gens qui disent:” J’adorerais être ici, c’est ma ville de prédilection et, malheureusement, le marché du logement n’est pas celui que je peux gérer. “”

Cunningham said these feelings are “heartbreaking for anyone, especially for people who care about the city”.

The city contributed $500,000 from its community housing fund to help complete the project, Cunningham said. He said the 232 units in the two developments provide affordable housing for 400 to 500 people.

“Nous perdons des logements abordables chaque fois qu’un parc de maisons mobiles est démoli, chaque fois qu’une subvention du HUD expire”, a-t-il déclaré. “So being able to say, ‘Boom, here’s 232 units that can solve the problems of 400 to 500 people’, you know, that’s huge.”

Seattle-based GMD Development partner Steve Dymoke said his firm relied exclusively on the low-income tax credit system to develop projects like the Arrowhead/Perennial Park property.

Il a déclaré que la société avait développé le projet Larkspur Commons à Bozeman il y a plusieurs années et venait récemment de clôturer son 10e projet dans le Montana. GMD has also developed affordable housing projects in Alaska, Washington and Idaho.

He said the $500,000 Bozeman donated for the Arrowhead/Perennial Park project was a key factor.

“You know, it may seem like a small percentage, but it plays an outsized role in feasibility,” he said. «Cela a vraiment conclu l’affaire, et au-delà de cela, cela signale vraiment à nos investisseurs, nos prêteurs, que la ville s’engage en quelque sorte à la soutenir financièrement. That’s a really strong vote of support.”

Dymoke praised Bozeman’s Rotherham Construction, which was responsible for building the complex. He said that despite COVID-19 challenges and supply chain issues, Rotherham “really managed to deliver on time overall. It’s really been impressive.”

Although residents are moving forward since the end of April, Dymoke said that a major opening celebration is scheduled for the site on June 8.

“If you had three wishes from the Affordable Housing Genius, this would be at the top of your wish list,” Cunningham said. “I can’t think of a project that has met so many community needs in one project. It’s really unique.

MT lawmakers debate raising movie tax credit; supporters say it boosts local businesses |

June 19, 2022

Montana Economy

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Kevin Costner was photographed this week browsing Scheels, a sporting goods store in Missoula, as lawmakers in Helena debated whether to extend and increase a tax credit intended to attract movie moguls like him in the state in the future.

On Friday, the Montana Legislature’s Interim Revenue Committee heard a presentation on the economic impact of Montana’s MEDIA Act tax credits. The law, signed into law in 2019, essentially broke even in terms of the revenue it brought in to the state government. Indeed, while the state distributed approximately $20.3 million in tax credits to film production companies, the state tax revenue generated by all film production companies and their expenses was approximately $20.3 million.

The Montana MEDIA Act tax credit was established by the state legislature in 2019 with a cap of $10 million, then expanded to a total cap of $12 million beginning in the tax year 2022. Because this is an incentive for production companies to film in Montana, eligible companies can get a 20% transferable income tax credit for production and compensation expenses during its stay in the state. Businesses can also earn additional credit for reaching various other thresholds.

An economic impact consultant gave a presentation showing how 195 different productions have shot in Montana since the law was created and spent $192 million in the state. Film industry advocates have urged the committee to consider raising the cap to between $50 million and $150 million to allow Montana to compete with other states. They say it’s necessary to encourage the growth of the industry, which they say supports Montana businesses, creates local jobs and doesn’t pollute the state’s precious outdoor spaces.

Two Republican members of the committee, Sen. Greg Hertz and Sen. Mike Lang, both expressed support for the idea of ​​at least possibly introducing a bill in the next session to raise the cap.

“It’s a tough industry,” Hertz said. “There is a lot of competition across the United States. It’s a good clean industry. It helps Montana, it helps a lot of rural communities. The question here is how do we continue to nurture this industry without becoming too excessive and having a big impact on our cash flow? »

Hertz said he believes lawmakers need to look into the matter and the cap may merit further increases.

Senator Brian Hoven, also a Republican, said he opposed the tax credit because the amount of tax revenue generated for the state by the only film companies that used the tax credit was only $7. .8 million. So, according to him, the state is losing money because the tax credit cost it $20.3 million.

“I think the film industry is very glamorous,” he said. “Movie stars are there, they show up, they bring people to rural communities, there’s a lot of money. It’s exciting, it’s great. But unfortunately, it does not bring money to the public treasury.

Hoven said he read articles in the Wall Street Journal that prove movie tax credits are unprofitable. Hoven said the director of the state Department of Revenue under former Gov. Steve Bullock insisted on having a cap on credit because he “knew it would be a drain on the treasury.”

“To invest in this, we pick winners and losers,” Hoven said. “When we start giving to the film industry, we choose them to win.”

However, the impact on state coffers is not a complete picture of the impact of film production on Montana’s economy. A report from the University of Montana found that a single season of Costner’s hit show “Yellowstone” brought in an additional $70 million to the state economy in one year.

Gina Lavery, a consultant hired by the state to analyze the impact of the movie tax credit, said the movie industry has a big “ripple effect” on rural communities and small businesses in Montana. That’s because highly paid staffers at production companies like Paramount Network, which shoots “Yellowstone” in Missoula and Ravalli counties, spend money even on days off.

Lavery also said that not raising the credit cap has hampered Montana’s economic growth and may continue to do so in the future.

She noted that a film production company was willing to build a $20 million studio in Missoula, but backed down when the legislature only raised the cap by $2 million last session.

“This type of investment, just the initial construction, would have generated $34 million for the state and $1.3 million in tax revenue for local jurisdictions and the state,” Lavery explained.

Allison Whitmer of the Montana Film Office said “Yellowstone” is currently filming its fifth season here and will likely film most of its sixth season in Montana. Combined with Paramount filming a new show called “1932” in Butte next year, Whitmer said those two shows alone will spend an estimated $50 million to $100 million in Montana over the next two years.

Hertz concluded that he thinks the Legislature should consider gradually increasing the cap, and he also noted that there may be ways to ensure it benefits rural communities in Montana. Utah, for example, has a film tax credit that only applies if companies shoot in small, rural towns.

The full presentation and discussion can be found fast forward to 10:25 a.m. online at bit.ly/3y0V1qc.

50 years of faltering progress in the United States – Hartford Courant

June 18, 2022

Montana Loans

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A timeline of key events before, during, and after the passage in 1972 of the landmark U.S. law known as Title IX:

1836: Georgia Women’s College is the first women’s college to open in the United States

1917: Jeannette Rankin of Montana becomes the first woman elected to Congress.

1920: american women win the right to vote.

1936: A federal appeals court actually says doctors can prescribe birth control to women.

1947: The first report of the Truman Commission calls for more equitable access to higher education, including an end to racial and religious discrimination.

1953: Toni Stone becomes the first woman to regularly play professional baseball (Negro Leagues).

1954: US Supreme Court says ‘separate educational institutions are inherently unequal’ in landmark Brown v. Board of Education of the Topeka decision.

1960: Wilma Rudolph becomes the first American woman to win three Olympic gold medals. The black sprinter star becomes a prominent civil rights activist.

1963: The Commission on the Status of Women, led by Eleanor Roosevelt, finds widespread discrimination against women in the United States and urges federal courts that “the principle of equality be firmly established in constitutional doctrine” . Congress passes Equal Pay Act.

1964: The Civil Rights Act includes sex as one of the things employers cannot discriminate against. It also establishes the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Hawaii’s Patsy Mink becomes first woman of color elected to U.S. House; she then co-authored Title IX, the Early Childhood Education Act and the Equal Women in Education Act.

1965: The Elementary and Secondary Education Act provides federal funding to K-12 schools with low-income student populations. President Lyndon Johnson also signs the Higher Education Act of 1965 which gives students access to loans, scholarships and other programs.

1966: The National Women’s Organization is established, calling for women to have “full participation in mainstream American society…in a truly equal partnership with men.”

1967: Aretha Franklin covers Otis Redding’s 1965 hit, “Respect, ” and it quickly becomes a feminist anthem.

1969: New York Democrat Shirley Chisholm becomes the first black woman in Congress. She later becomes the first woman to seek the presidential nomination.

1971: The Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women (AIAW) is founded to govern collegiate women’s athletics and administer national championships.

1972: Congress passes Title IX, which is enacted by President Richard Nixon. Title IX states: “No person in the United States shall, because of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied benefits, or be discriminated against in connection with any program or activity of education with federal financial assistance.” Congress also passes the Equal Rights Amendment, but it never gets the 38 state approval needed to become law.

1973: The Supreme Court renders its opinion Roe v. Wade establishing the right to abortion. Billie Jean King defeats Bobby Riggs in straight sets in “The Battle of the Sexes” tennis exhibition match.

1974: The Women’s Education Equity Act provides grants and contracts to help with “gender-neutral programs,” as well as to help institutions meet Title IX requirements.

1975: President Gerald Ford signs Title IX Athletics Regulationswhich gives athletics departments up to three years to implement, after noting that “it was the intention of Congress, for whatever reason for interpretation, to include athletics.”

1976: The NCAA challenges the legality of Title IX regarding athletics in a lawsuit that is dismissed two years later.

1977: Three female Yale students, two graduates and one male faculty member become the first to sue for sexual harassment under Title IX (Alexander v. Yale). He would fail on appeal.

1979: Ann Meyers becomes the first woman to sign an NBA contract (Indiana Pacers, $500,000). She had been the first woman to receive a basketball scholarship from UCLA.

1979: US officials have implemented the important three-pronged test for Title IX compliance in athletics.

1980: Oversight of Title IX is performed by the Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights.

nineteen eighty one : Sandra Day O’Connor becomes the first woman appointed to the United States Supreme Court.

1982: Louisiana Tech defeats Cheyney State for the first NCAA women’s basketball title. Two months later, the AIAW folded, placing top women’s collegiate sports entirely under the umbrella of the NCAA. Cheryl Miller scores 105 points in a high school game for launch one of the greatest careers in basketball history.

1984: Democrat Geraldine Ferraro becomes the first woman to earn a vice-presidential nomination from a major political party. The United States wins its first Olympic gold medal in women’s basketball.

1987: Pat Summitt wins first of eight national women’s basketball titles at Tennessee.

1988: Congress overturns President Ronald Reagan’s veto of the Civil Rights Restoration Act of 1987, mandating the application of Title IX to any school receiving federal funds.

1994: The Athletics Equity Disclosure Act is passed. Under Title IX, schools with federal financial aid and athletics programs must provide annual gender equity information, including roster sizes and certain budgets.

1995: Connecticut wins first of 11 national titles under coach Geno Auriemma.

1996: The female athletes win a lawsuit and force Brown to restore funding for women’s gymnastics and volleyball after saying the school violated Title IX by turning both teams into donor-funded entities. The NBA clears the way for the Women’s National Basketball Association to begin play the following year.

1999: Brandi Chastain penalty gives USA victory over China in the World Cup final, reinvigorating women’s sport in the United States

2001: Ashley Martin becomes the first woman to play and score in a Division I football game as a placekicker for Jacksonville State.

2008: Danica Patrick wins the Japan 300 to become the first female winner at the highest level of American open-wheel racing.

2014 : Becky Hamon becomes the first full-time assistant coach in NBA history.

2015 : United States’ 5-2 victory against Japan in the final of the Women’s World Cup became the most-watched football game in American television history.

2016: Citing Title IX, the Obama administration says transgender students in public schools should be allowed to use the bathroom or locker room that matches their gender identity, the advice has been cancelled by the Trump administration. hillary clinton becomes the first woman to win a major party nomination for president.

2017: Serena Williams wins her 23rd Grand Slam titlesecond all time.

2020: New Amendments to Title IX take effect, mainly with regard to sexual harassment.

2021: Report tears NCAA apart for failing to live up to commitment to gender equality prioritizing its lucrative Division I men’s basketball tournament “above all else,” including the women’s championships.

2022: Dawn Staley of South Carolina becomes the first black Division I basketball coach, male or female, to win more than one national championship. The United States women’s national soccer team reaches a stage agreement to be paid equally to the men’s national team.

Montana budget on ‘high sugar,’ but expected revenue cuts | State

June 17, 2022

Montana Economy

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Illustration of money (Pxhere.com | Public domain images).

On a “high sugar,” the state of Montana should have plenty of extra cash in store by the start of the 2025 biennium, but revenues are volatile and a shortfall is already forecast for the fight against fires.

At the end of the 2021 legislative session, the closing fund balance was expected to be $157.2 million higher than the operating reserve at the start of the 2025 biennium, but this figure is expected to reach $1.7 billion. dollars, according to a forecast this week from Parliament. Tax Division of the Montana Legislature.

“We probably shouldn’t think about spending it right now because it’s too unpredictable,” Rep. Mary Caferro, D-Helena, said at the meeting.

At a joint meeting of the Legislative Finance Committee and the Interim Revenue Committee, tax analysts presented the outlook for the 2025 biennium ahead of the next legislature. At the meeting and in their report, they warned that it was difficult to make projections given the unpredictable rates of inflation, uncertain demographic trends and changes in labor economics, such as higher wages. and lower labor force participation.

“Strong collections offer a secure start to the 2025 biennial budget process, but economic uncertainty clouds the future,” reads the budget outlook.

Firefighting costs are rising

On the expense side, however, the cost of firefighting has increased and is expected to continue, according to the outlook. The report estimates that the average cost of wildfire suppression has increased by 31%, from $22.3 million per year to $29.2 million per year over the span of a decade.

The report also notes that while the Department of Natural Resources and Conservation is effective against fires, suppressing 96% of burns under 10 acres over the past decade, those that grow ‘account for most of the expense’. .

Going forward, costs are expected to increase given longer fire seasons and higher costs for labor, fuel and supplies, as well as “an increasing number of large fires”, according to the report. The state sets a formula in law for its fire suppression fund, and based on the last 10 years of average income and expenses, Montana could see a shortfall of $14.2 million for the biennial. , and with extreme fires, a shortfall of up to $81.4 million, the report says.


Montana receives major disaster declaration from President Joe Biden


Helena Area Habitat for Humanity is looking to send volunteers to help clean up after flooding at Red Lodge

Revenues fall in advance

At the meeting, at least a few people called the state budget “high sugar,” and one presenter said every other state was in the same boat. The outlook indicates that the large sums of money in savings are due to the federally stimulated economy and a strong stock market in 2021 as well as inflation, but the tide is likely to turn.

“Projected revenue for fiscal 2023 is expected to fall at least 10% but possibly as much as 20% from fiscal 2022,” the report said. “This represents a reduction of $347 million – $721 million in general fund revenue in just one year.”

However, legislative budget analyst and divisional director Amy Carlson warned lawmakers that the possible 20% drop was an alternative estimate and that the drop could be steeper.

“It shouldn’t be considered the worst case scenario,” Carlson said. “It’s just another forecast at the moment.”

The report also says that recent years of high earnings “provide a cushion to absorb the extreme volatility expected in fiscal 2023.”

Cloud forecast

The outlook was dire for staff, who face more financial uncertainties than usual, Carlson said. For example, she said a market forecast indicates that inflation, at around 8%, will slow in fiscal 2023, but that’s not a long-term datum.

“Clearly the Federal Reserve is doing what it can to moderate inflation, and only time will tell if it’s successful,” Carlson said.

She also said this week’s analysis was by no means refined and that lawmakers would receive more budget information in the fall, before the 2023 legislature. She also said her staff generally takes the presentation budget on the road to Montana.

The post-Montana budget on a “high sugar,” but planned revenue cuts appeared first on Daily Montanan.

FAU Study: New England States Lead in Lawyer Discipline | Your money

June 17, 2022

Montana Lending

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BOCA RATON Florida, June 17, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The New England states of New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Vermont lead the 50 states in lawyer discipline, devoting more resources to processing and to the resolution of wrongdoing complaints, according to a study by researchers at Florida Atlantic University.

The study, published in The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, also found that Alabama, New York, and Missouri finished with the bottom three composite scores, respectively.

Florida ranked seventh lowest in the United States, according to the study, which found that poor lawyer discipline is an indicator of corruption but not a direct measure.

UFA researchers James McNultyPh.D., and graduate student Jason Damm, Ph.D., said states with limited discipline have less reliable and less predictable legal systems, which makes it more difficult for businesses to operate smoothly.

Researchers have also found a correlation between states committed to disciplining lawyers and long-term economic growth, although there is no direct link. They suggest that more research in this area could prove useful.

“More resources for lawyer discipline would likely improve economic growth rates for states at the bottom of our rankings,” said McNulty, professor emeritus of finance at FAU. College of Business. “Law schools in these states would also be wise to focus more on legal ethics.”

Damm earned a doctorate from FAU this year and will begin teaching at the University of Miami in the fall. He and McNulty reached their conclusions after analyzing data from 2000 to 2017.

They used the American Bar Association’s Annual Survey of Lawyer Discipline (SOLD) and developed five measures of discipline: number of complaints; number of lawyers accused of misconduct; the relationship between the number of lawyers assigned and the number of complaints; the budget for the discipline of lawyers; and workload per disciplinary lawyer.

In scoring the highest, New Hampshire had the fourth fewest complaints of the 50 states, the fourth lowest case count, and the fourth highest case count per disciplinary attorney.

Alabama’s highest ranking was 25th among indicted attorneys, and the state finished no better than No. 31 in the other four categories.

After Vermont, the states with the highest composite scores are: South Carolina; Texas; California; Hawaii; Georgia; Virginia; and Washington. The other states in the bottom 10 of the ranking were: Kentucky; Ohio; North Carolina; Indiana; Montana; and Idaho.

McNulty and Damm said they were unaware of another study that used SOLD data to assess lawyer discipline and its effect on state growth.

The researchers noted that if the states are alike in all material respects except for lawyer discipline, it is likely that lawyers struggling with ethical issues will choose to practice in the most lenient area. Additionally, companies that generate large profits through unethical practices such as racketeering, extreme pollution, and predatory lending are more likely to do business in states where there are more lawyers for defend them and who are willing to deviate from the standards governing the legal profession.

“Prosecutors are officers of justice,” according to the study. “If citizens cannot trust the people who make and enforce laws, it is more difficult for any society to function effectively.”

Paul Owers Florida Atlantic University College of Business 561-221-4090 [email protected]

Copyright 2022 GlobeNewswire, Inc.

Aikta Marcoulier: SBA Helps Montana Communities – Homeowners, Renters, Nonprofits and Businesses – Recover Quickly from Disasters | Columnists

June 17, 2022

Montana Mortgages

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AKITA MARCOULIER

Montana is no stranger to disasters, both natural and man-made. The state has a long history of natural disasters, including floods, wildfires, tornadoes, and drought. The recent flooding near Yellowstone National Park is an example of this problem. It’s more important now for residents and small businesses to remember that the best course of action to limit damage from natural disasters is to prepare before disaster strikes.

The Biden administration and SBA Administrator Isabella Casillas Guzman have been at the forefront of ensuring that small businesses, nonprofits, and individual landlords and tenants impacted by natural disasters across the country are getting the support and recovery assistance they need, and the tools to build resilience.

Natural disasters are not only more devastating; they also happen faster, more frequently, and often change rapidly in complexity and scope. In 2020, the United States suffered twenty-two separate billion-dollar disasters – the largest in our history – but space experts expect that number to continue to rise. As the anchors of our communities, small businesses rely on resilient neighborhoods for their customers and employees, and SBA disaster relief loan programs help communities recover quickly.

People also read…

• The SBA Disaster Loan Program is the only federal assistance program that provides private homeowners with an affordable way to lessen the impacts of disasters and protect their homes, families, businesses, employees and livelihoods against the next disaster.

• SBA disaster loan funds can be used to cover insurance deductibles, refinance an existing mortgage, pay for mitigation and protection upgrades, relocate to a safer, lower-risk area, and Moreover. These loans have fixed interest rates amortized over 30 years for low monthly payments and provide an affordable way for homeowners to fully repair/replace their disaster losses not covered by other resources.

• Borrowers using SBA’s physical disaster loan programs are also eligible for up to 20% of their total physical losses, as verified by the SBA, to incorporate additional safeguards to mitigate future damage and loss against the next disaster.

• The SBA offers non-pandemic economic disaster loans to help small businesses, small agricultural cooperatives, and most private nonprofit organizations in a declared disaster area rebuild after suffering a loss. substantial.

• The SBA has several local partner resources to help business owners develop a disaster continuity plan, whether your business is in disaster relief, recovery, or continuity. Across Montana, there are more than fifteen resource partner offices, including Small Business Development Centers, SCORE, a Veterans Awareness Center, and a Women’s Business Center to help you plan for your disaster.

The best way to mitigate the effects of a disaster is to create a disaster continuity plan. This plan should outline how you will contact family, friends, employees and first responders after a disaster. You should also review your insurance coverage to ensure it is up to date and covers all necessary costs. Most importantly, practice and evaluate your plan with family members, managers, and staff to make sure it works. For more information about SBA’s disaster programs, please visit sba.gov/disaster and be sure to follow us on Twitter @SBArockymtn.

Aikta Marcoulier is the SBA’s regional administrator based in Denver. She oversees agency programs and services in Colorado, Montana, Utah, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wyoming.

Daines Slams Democrats Who Killed His ‘Gas Price Relief Act’

June 15, 2022

Montana Economy

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Montana Sen. Steve Daines recently joined Kansas Sen. Roger Marshall in introducing a bill to lower gasoline prices for Americans, called “The Gas Prices Relief Act,” but Bill was killed before exiting the Senate.

Daines appeared on the floor of the US Senate on Tuesday to express his anger and disappointment with senators who opposed the bill. He explained the premises of the bill.

“Madam President, the price at the pump has skyrocketed,” said Senator Daines. “Let’s take a quick trip down memory lane. When President Biden was sworn in, the average weekly gasoline price was around $2.30 per gallon. In fact, when we introduced the bill that we’re trying to pass today, the Gas Price Relief Act, on March 31 of this year, the weekly average was $4.02 a gallon . The weekly average is now $4.84. In fact, other studies show it’s now $5 and climbing.

Daines shared an anecdote from his last trip back to Montana.

“We believe these numbers will continue to rise, and most analysts agree,” he said. “We could be facing $6.00 per gallon of gasoline by this summer. I filled up my van in Belgrade, Montana Friday night. My wife and I stopped at a gas station and when the tank was full the price was $138. The pain at the pump Montana families are feeling today is due to the Democrats’ anti-American energy policies.

Daines asked the senators present about a possible solution, referring to what President Biden has already suggested to bring down gas prices.

” What is the solution ? ” He asked. “We hear President Biden turning to foreign dictators for more oil, tapping or oil reserves or pleading with OPEC to increase production. But perhaps the most disconnected solution I’ve heard, he simply suggests that families buy electric vehicles. I can say that won’t work in a state like Montana. The real solution is to unleash American energy and encourage American energy investment.

Daines explained the benefits of the Gas Price Relief Act.

“This bill I have with Senator Marshall was simple,” he said. “This prevents the Biden administration from imposing new rules or regulations that would reduce the production of petroleum gas or renewable fuels, which would therefore increase gas prices for hard-working Montanese. I urge my colleagues across the way to think about the hard working families across the country. How they try to make ends meet, think of their constituents, who depend on affordable gas prices to get to work or drop their kids off at school. I urge my colleagues opposite who say they support American energy development and want to reduce gas costs to support this bill.

The Senate voted this week to kill the bill.

WATCH: See how much gas it cost the year you started driving

To learn more about how gas prices have changed over the years, Stacker calculated the cost of a gallon of gas for each of the past 84 years. Using data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (released April 2020), we analyzed the average price of a gallon of regular unleaded gasoline from 1976 to 2020 along with the consumer price index (CPI ) for regular unleaded gasoline from 1937 to 1976, including absolute and inflation-adjusted prices for each year.

Read on to explore the cost of gas over time and rediscover how much a gallon cost when you first started driving.

Discover the must-see roads in each state

WATCH: Here are the 10 US golf destinations with the most courses per capita

Find out where you can find the best access in the country for your course choice, the unique terrain that lends itself to world-class golf and what makes certain clubs stand out.

Plumas Bancorp awarded among the best banks in its category

June 15, 2022

Montana Mortgages

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RENO, Nev., June 15, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Plumas Bancorp (NASDAQ:PLBC), the holding company of Plumas Bank, announced several accolades by leading financial investment firms that assess the performance of financial institutions at national scale. Honors are awarded based on key performance indicators that signal positive value to potential investors and indicate an institution’s ability to generate consistent growth.

Building on over 40 years of excellence, Plumas Bancorp has again been recognized with numerous awards from key financial industry groups. “Plumas Bank is focused on building strong communities – one business and one customer at a time. This foundation drives us to deliver banking excellence and deliver strong value to our customers, shareholders and local communities,” said Andrew J. Ryback, President and CEO, Plumas Bancorp and Plumas Bank.

Ryback continued, “We are growing and performing very well despite the past two years of volatility with the pandemic and wildfires that have devastated our region. These accomplishments are a testament to the strategic vision of our Board of Directors and our leaders and the incredible work of each member of the team.

DA Davidson Bison Select Report recognizes Plumas Bancorp for Fourth consecutive year
For the fourth consecutive year, Plumas Bancorp has met the criteria to be included in DA Davidson’s 2021 Bison Select Report. A financial services firm, DA Davidson releases the semi-annual research report with a focus on recognizing high performing emerging institutions that may be overlooked by investors due to their size.

The Raymond James Bankers Cup awarded to Plumas Bancorp for the fifth consecutive year
For the fifth consecutive year, Plumas Bancorp received the prestigious Raymond James Bankers Cup. Plumas Bancorp ranked in the top 10% out of 229 community banks with assets between $500 million and $10 billion. Additionally, it has consistently ranked among the top five banks every year since 2017. Recognition is based on profitability, operational efficiency, and balance sheet metrics. The Community Bankers Cup recognizes outstanding performance and rewards community banks that create long-term shareholder value.

Findley Reports awards Plumas Bancorp its highest recognitionsame years in a row
For the seventh consecutive year, The Findley Reports, Inc. has recognized Plumas Bancorp as a Super Premier Performing Bank – the highest of The Findley Report’s recognition levels. Plumas Bank is one of 84 Western banks to receive a Super Premiere rating for performance in 2021. Findley’s annual review rates banks on increased liquidity, capital adequacy, structure and growth of assets, quality of loan portfolio and deposits, operational performance, return on equity and stability of senior management.

2022 KBW Bank Honor Roll names Plumas Bancorp as one of the best banking institutions in its category
For the first time, Plumas Bancorp has been added to the coveted Keefe, Bruyette & Woods, Inc., Bank Honor Roll. The winners are publicly traded banking institutions with more than $500 million in total assets that have consistently recorded increases in annual earnings per share over the past decade. KBW found that 17 banking institutions, or only 5% of all banks reviewed, qualified to be on the 2022 KBW Bank Honor Roll.

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About Plumas Bancorp and Plumas Bank
Founded in 1980, Plumas Bank is a locally managed, full-service community bank headquartered in Quincy, California. The bank’s holding company, Plumas Bancorp, was established in 2002 and entered the Nasdaq small cap market in 2005. Plumas Bancorp is headquartered in Reno, Nevada. Plumas Bank operates fourteen branches: twelve located in the California counties of Plumas, Lassen, Placer, Nevada, Modoc, Shasta and Sutter, and two branches located in Nevada in Washoe and Carson City counties. The bank also operates three loan origination offices: two located in California’s Placer and Butte counties, and one located in Klamath County, Oregon. Plumas Bank offers a wide range of financial and investment services to consumers and businesses and has been awarded Nationwide Preferred Lender Status with the United States Small Business Administration. For more information about Plumas Bancorp and Plumas Bank, please visit our website at plumasbank.com.

About DA Davidson
DA Davidson Companies is an employee-owned financial services company providing a range of financial and advisory services to individuals, businesses, institutions and municipalities nationwide. Founded in 1935 with headquarters in Great Falls, Montana, and regional headquarters in Denver, Los Angeles, New York, Omaha and Seattle, the company has approximately 1,475 employees and offices in 27 states.

About Raymond James Financial, Inc..
Raymond James Financial, Inc. (NYSE: RJF) is a leading diversified financial services company providing services to private client groups, capital markets, asset management, banking and other retail services. , businesses and municipalities. The company has approximately 8,700 financial advisors. Total client assets are $1.18 trillion. Public since 1983, the company is listed on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol RJF.

About Findley Reports
Since 1967, The Findley Reports has been the foundation of Findley Companies, providing valuable and accurate financial information to help directors and management navigate the challenges and complexities of banking. The Findley Reports provide the banking industry with performance benchmarking through its annual Super Premier Performing, Premier Performing and Commendable Performing designations.

About KBW
KBW (Keefe, Bruyette & Woods, Inc.) is a Stifel company. Over the years, KBW has established itself as a leading independent authority in the banking, insurance, brokerage, asset management, mortgage banking and specialty finance industries. Founded in 1962, the firm maintains leadership positions in research, corporate finance, mergers and acquisitions, and the sale and trading of equity securities of financial services companies.


        

A look back at the Colorado Avalanche’s very first game in 1995, the Stanley Cup victory in 1996

June 14, 2022

Montana Lending

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DENVER — The Colorado Avalanche’s first-ever game of 1995 started and ended with a bang, kicking off a season that ended with the Lord Stanley Cup in the hands of all Denver’s new hockey team.

The Avs traveled to Denver via financial difficulties in Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. The Quebec Nordiques were truly a “low level team” and Comsat Entertainment (now Ascent Entertainment) purchased them on May 25, 1995. The deal was finalized on July 1 and after the Nordiques moved to Denver, the franchise was officially named the Colorado Avalanche about a month later, according to the NHL.

It rekindled enthusiasm for the city of Denver and the Colorados who had no local team to cheer on since the Colorado Rockies hockey team relocated to become the New Jersey Devils in 1982.

After the move was announced, more than 12,000 season tickets were sold in 37 days, according to the NHL.

On the evening of Oct. 6, 1995, the Avs donned their new uniforms and skated on the ice at Denver’s McNichols Sports Arena — which was torn down and rebuilt as the Pepsi Center in 2000 and renamed the Ball Arena in 2020 — for their first match. Fireworks exploded into the air in celebration, according to the Associated Press.

In its very first regular season game, the Avalanche won 3-2 against the Detroit Red Wings in front of a sold-out arena, with left winger Valeri Kamensky scoring two goals, including one near the 10th minute and another with less than four minutes left in the game. Defender Craig Wolanin scored the second goal, the AP reported.

The Vancouver SUN | October 7, 1995 (Joe Mahoney/Associated Press photo)

The puck found the net behind Avs goaltender Stephane Fiset within the first two minutes of the game, but he was “almost flawless thereafter, stopping 30 shots,” according to the AP.

“After the first goal I knew I had to close the door,” Fiset told the AP. “It’s my job, just to keep the team in the game. I knew we had a lot of time to score, so I just wanted to keep us close and give us a chance to win.

The first penalty in Avalanche history was awarded to Claude Lemieux for a high stick 42 seconds into that game, according to the AP.

READ MORE: Commerce City boy practices in full goalie gear while watching Avalanche games

After the Avs’ victory that night, NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman helped raise a banner at McNichols Sports Arena in Denver to signal the successful return of hockey to Colorado.

It “proved to be a hit with the vocal fans and Avalanche players,” the AP wrote the next day.

Headlines touted the Avs win: “Red Wings buried by Avalanche,” “Avalanche start season in Denver,” “Avalanche slide to 3-2 win with Kamensky goal in third.”

“If goalie Stephane Fiset doesn’t fade in the playoffs like he did last season, the team is a Stanley Cup threat,” wrote a Montana Standard reporter.

The players also expressed their enthusiasm to the media.

Right-winger Owen Nolan told The Gazette from Quebec that “We had good fans in Quebec, but it’s like night and day when it comes to volume. … It’s really a great motivator, especially when the guys are tired. pick us up as a team.

Avalanche Captain Joe Sakic — now Executive Vice President of Hockey Operations for the Avs — says the Red Wings caught them off guard early on.

“It was pretty important for us to knock out the first one at home, and it shows how far we’ve come,” he told The Associated Press.

The Avs fought tooth and nail throughout the regular season, acquiring big names along the way, like goaltender Patrick Roy and forward Mike Keane in December 1995.

After a season of ups and downs – but mostly ups – Denver was buzzing with excitement in May 1996 as the city’s new home team headed to the Stanley Cup Finals against the Florida Panthers.

Final tickets were the most popular items in town, The Daily Sentinel reported on May 31, adding that fans gathered outside the 16,000-seat McNichols Arena hours before tickets became available in the hope to get a seat to see the series.

VANBIESKBROUCK FITZGERALD RICCI

ED ANDRIESKI/Associated Press

Colorado Avalanche center Mike Ricci, bottom forward, falls to the ice after hitting the puck for a goal past Florida Panthers center Tom Fitzgerald, center, and goaltender John Vanbiesbrouck in the second period during the first Stanley Cup game at McNichols Sports Arena in Denver on Tuesday, June 4, 1996. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

Game 1 started on June 4, 1996.

How was the series? As the AP wrote on June 11, the day after Game 4 in Miami: “The Colorado Avalanche took a long time to make quick work of the Florida Panthers.”

In a four-game sweep, the Avs clinched victory, but not before the longest playoff day of the season, when the game went to triple overtime. With 44:31 of overtime – lending to a game that from start to finish lasted four hours and 58 minutes – Game 4 is ranked as the longest scoreless contest and the third longest in the history of the final of the Stanley Cup, the AP reported.

Defender Uwe Krupp scored the game-winning goal at 4:31 of third overtime.

Team captain Sakic, also the league’s MVP that year, called the victory the greatest moment of his life. In total, he scored 18 playoff goals, nearly tying the NHL record. Of those 18, six were winners, according to the AP.

Joe Sakic holding the Stanley Cup after winning in 1996

The Daily Sentinel | June 11, 1996 (Associated Press photo)

Even the Panthers acknowledged the outstanding competition.

“There’s not a guy in the room that I’m not personally proud of,” Panthers player John Vanbiesbrouck told the AP. “The game was intense. It was an epic game.”

The Avs praised their goaltender, Roy, as an “almost royal thing” who wasn’t the loudest, strongest or fastest player, but “there’s no doubt he’s the Colorado Avalanche man,” the Daily Sentinel reported on June 11.

Sports Illustrated Colorado Avs 1996 Stanley Cup Victory

The Daily Sentinel | June 12, 1996 (Associated Press photo)

“Hockey is a dynamic sport,” Av defender Sylvain Jean Lefebvre told a reporter. “And there will be times when the other team will have it. A lot of times in those situations it’s up to the goalkeeper to reverse the momentum. It’s up to the goalkeeper to calm everybody down, to bringing everyone back to the same page. And when your keeper is Patrick Roy, when you look back and see him in the net, it’s an incredible feeling. You just know that everything is going to be okay.

As victory came in Miami, Denver’s Larimer Square erupted with horns and cheers after Krupp’s goal.

“For all of us who have been waiting to say we are the world champions of something, we can finally say it,” former Denver mayor Wellington Webb told the AP. “We are very proud of it and we are going to celebrate all aspects of it.

In a newspaper article published two days after the victory, the AP wrote that the Avalanche “did what the Broncos of the NFL and the Nuggets of the NBA could not accomplish, which the Rockies of hockey (who later moved to New Jersey) failed to approach in six seasons and what baseball’s Rockies only see in their dreams.

CORBET

RICK BOWMER/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Colorado Avalanche’s Rene Corbet hoists the Stanley Cup in the air after the Colorado Avalanche beat the Florida Panthers 1-0 in triple overtime to sweep the final 4-0 in Miami on Monday, June 10, 1996. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

Excluding the first five years of major North American professional sports leagues, the Avs were only the second team to win a title in their first year, the AP reported.

Among the celebrations, first-year coach Marc Crawford paid tribute to dedicated Nordiques-turned-Avs fans in Quebec.

“I would like them to feel included in our victory,” he told the AP. “We lived in a wonderful hockey city and we were lucky to be welcomed into another. We had a beautiful house in Quebec and now we have a beautiful house in Denver.

It was a nod to a long journey crowned with the best prize in the game.

“A year ago Denver didn’t have a hockey team. Now he has a Stanley Cup,” the AP article read.

Although the Avs had successful games in subsequent regular seasons, they didn’t make a return to the Stanley Cup Finals until 2001 when the team defeated the New Jersey Devils in Game 7. .

The Avalanche are now back in contention for the Stanley Cup for the first time since 2001 as they prepare to face the Tampa Bay Lightning.

Oilers Avalanche Hockey

Jack Dempsey/AP

Colorado Avalanche goaltender Pavel Francouz skates on the ice after the team’s 4-0 win over the Edmonton Oilers in Game 2 of the Western Conference Playoff Finals of the NHL Stanley Cup on Thursday, June 2, 2022, in Denver. (AP Photo/Jack Dempsey)

Game 1 begins at 6 p.m. Wednesday and Denver7 brings you all the action on our airwaves.

Here’s a breakdown of the games, which all start at 6 p.m. on Denver7 (with pregame coverage at 5:30 p.m.):

  • Game 1: Wednesday, June 15
  • Game 2: Saturday June 18
  • Game 3: Monday, June 20
  • Game 4: Wednesday, June 22
  • Game 5: Friday, June 24 (if needed)
  • Game 6: Sunday June 26 (if needed)
  • Game 7: Tuesday, June 28 (if needed)

Click here for more ways and places to watch Stanley Cup Finals games.

READ MORE: Ball Arena and Denver Sports Commission speak out on Stanley Cup Final impacts

East Helena man convicted of bank fraud in $1million COVID-19 relief package

June 13, 2022

Montana Mortgages

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An East Helena man who admitted to lying in a scheme to receive more than $1 million in Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans backed by the Small Business Administration (SBA) for aid to coronavirus relief and using the money instead for personal gain was sentenced on June 7 to 30 months in prison, followed by three years of supervised release, according to a press release from the US attorney’s office.

Trevor Gene Lanius-McLeod, 48, pleaded guilty in December 2021 to bank fraud and engaging in monetary transactions in property from specified illegal activities.

Chief U.S. District Judge Brian M. Morris presided. Chief Justice Morris also ordered restitution of $1 million, $125,000 of which will be paid jointly with co-defendant Kasey Wilson who was sentenced in March 2022.

“During a difficult time in our country’s history, Lanius-McLeod stole money from a government program designed to keep businesses afloat and lined their pockets at the expense of truly needy businesses. Today we send a strong message that such fraud will not go unpunished in the District of Montana. I want to thank Assistant U.S. Attorney Colin M. Rubich, IRS Criminal Investigation, the FBI, and all of our law enforcement partners for their work on this case,” U.S. Attorney Jesse Laslovich said.

The PPP program, part of the federal CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act), provided emergency assistance to small businesses for job retention and certain other expenses.

“Today’s sentence is a direct reflection of the seriousness of Mr. Lanius-McLeod’s crimes,” said Andy Tsui, special agent in charge of the IRS local office of criminal investigations in Denver. “Not only is Lanius-McLeod guilty of crimes against the federal government, but he also victimized individuals and businesses that the Paycheck Protection Program was meant to protect. These actions will not be tolerated, and the judge’s decision sends a clear message to those who attempt to defraud CARES Act programs that these crimes will not go unpunished.

In court documents, the government alleged that beginning in April 2020, Lanius-McLeod devised a scheme to fraudulently obtain PPP money. Lanius-McLeod applied for four PPP loans through the Valley Bank of Helena. In the applications, Lanius-McLeod made numerous material and false statements to obtain approximately $1,043,000 in fraudulent funds from the four loans. In addition, Lanius-McLeod applied for and received a PPP loan in the amount of $349,000 on behalf of Renovated Montana Properties LLP, an entity controlled by Lanius-McLeod.

Lanius-McLeod made numerous misrepresentations about the PPP loan application. If not for the misrepresentations, Lanius-McLeod would not have qualified for a PPP loan. The defendant falsely stated that Renovated Montana Properties LLP paid payroll taxes and had 25 employees. The company never paid payroll taxes and had no employees outside of Lanius-McLeod.

The government further alleged that, in a promissory note, the defendant agreed to use the funds for business-related expenses. None of the loan money was used for these purposes. Instead, the proceeds were spent on various personal expenses, including the mortgage on Lanius-McLeod’s personal residence.

“Trevor Lanius-McLeod greedily robbed small businesses that depended on PPP funds to survive,” said Salt Lake City FBI Special Agent in Charge Dennis Rice. “His sentence should serve as a reminder that the FBI and our federal partners are working vigilantly to ensure that federal aid funds are used as intended, and that those who defraud these programs will be held accountable.”

Assistant U.S. Attorney Colin M. Rubich prosecuted the case, which was investigated by the IRS-Criminal Investigation and the FBI, with assistance from the U.S. Treasury Inspector General for the US tax administration and secret service.

On May 17, 2021, the Attorney General established the COVID-19 Fraud Enforcement Task Force to mobilize the resources of the Department of Justice in partnership with agencies across government to scale up efforts to combating and preventing fraud linked to the pandemic.

The task force strengthens efforts to investigate and prosecute the most culpable domestic and international criminal actors and assists agencies administering relief programs to prevent fraud, among other methods, by increasing and integrating coordination mechanisms existing ones, identifying resources and techniques to uncover fraudulent actors and their agendas, and sharing and leveraging information and knowledge gained from previous enforcement efforts. For more information about the Department’s response to the pandemic, please visit https://www.justice.gov/coronavirus.

Anyone with information about alleged attempted fraud involving COVID-19 can report it by calling the Department of Justice’s National Center for Disaster Fraud (NCDF) hotline at 866-720-5721 or via NCDF’s online complaint form at: https://www. .justice.gov/disaster-fraud/ncdf-disaster-complaint-form.

NJ senator calls for discrimination based on height and weight to be banned

June 13, 2022

Montana Loans

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Currently, Michigan is the only state in the nation that prohibits discrimination based on height or weight under its civil rights law, and there is no such federal law.

New Jersey State Sen. Andrew Zwicker of D-Monmouth Junction would like to see the Garden State become the second in the United States to ban such biases in hiring, housing and educational practices.

“It’s a serious issue, and we don’t condone racial discrimination, gender discrimination, or age discrimination,” Zwicker said.

His bill (S2741), which was introduced June 2 and referred to the Senate Labor Committee, would categorize rejection based on height and weight under the state’s “anti-discrimination law.”

It’s something Zwicker said some other states or individual cities have come up with, but he was “shocked” to learn was not on New Jersey’s books.

He said studies have shown “widespread” discrimination specifically around weight, usually much more in women than in men, and he thinks it’s both harmful and hurtful.

“A study I saw said that between 20% and 40% of overweight people reported some sort of discriminatory behavior towards them,” Zwicker said. “Society put in these ideal sizes, these ideal weights, and those are just things that have been created, and not everyone fits that ideal. And so, people are treated differently.”

According to the wording of Zwicker’s proposal, Michigan law prohibits discrimination in “employment, education, housing, public housing, and public office,” among other grounds, and the senator hopes to cover the same ground. with the New Jersey bill.

Exceptions are provided for cases “in which an individual’s height or weight is a bona fide occupational qualification”, the bill says.

In short, Zwicker’s legislation would empower someone who believes they have suffered such discrimination to sue.

He cited an Atlantic City case years ago, in which a judge dismissed a lawsuit brought by female casino workers who were weighed weekly and threatened with dismissal because there was no basis in New Jersey law to support their claims.

This bill, he said, would close that loophole.

“It’s more than common sense, it’s just the right thing to do, that’s why I wrote it and why I stand for it now,” Zwicker said.

Zwicker intends the legislation to take effect immediately if and when it is passed and signed by the governor.

Patrick Lavery is a reporter and anchor for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach him at [email protected]

Click here to contact an editor about a comment or correction for this story.

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Sri Lanka’s steps towards the end of the heat wave – Analysis – Eurasia Review

June 12, 2022

Montana Lending

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With progress towards political stability and the assurance of broad external support, there is hope that Sri Lanka will overcome the crisis.

After months of economic distress, peaceful expressions of public anger punctuated by indiscriminate violence, political strife and institutional instability, Sri Lanka now seems on the road to a return to normalcy.

There’s no denying that the winding queues for fuel and cooking gas are still there, and the prices for basic necessities are sky-high. Some basic necessities such as powdered milk have either disappeared from the market or are too expensive. But the power supply has improved significantly, putting an end, so to speak, to an “age of darkness”.

The term of government, which had ceased to run in several parts of the country, including the critical space outside the president’s office in Colombo, has been reinstated. The threat of disciplinary action prevented a strike by Ceylon Electricity Board engineers, which would have cut power to the entire island. The engineers demanded the cancellation of two energy projects financed by the foreign private sector, including one by the Adanis of India.

As India continues to deliver essentials like food, fuel, fertilizer and medicine to the best of its ability, China has finally come out of its shell and signaled its readiness to step in to help the Sri Lanka in trouble. A row with Russia (a potential fuel supplier) over the legality of an Aeroflot flight ended in a diplomatic engagement, albeit belatedly. Apparently, it takes time for the Lankan bureaucracy to assimilate Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe’s advice that it should treat the country’s traditional friends with respect and consideration.

Political stability

Painfully elusive political stability now seems within reach. It finally became clear to the main political actors, both on the side of power and the opposition, that without political stability, international financial assistance will not be available.

While President Gotabaya Rajapaksa has remained steadfast in his position that he would only step down if expelled by constitutional means and not under pressure from street agitators, the Aragalaya or The struggle to force him to quit has run out of steam. This allowed him to start functioning normally. But the “Go Gota Go” activists could take satisfaction from the fact that they ousted the other Rajapaksas, including Prime Minister Mahinda Rajapaksa.

Appointment of Wickremesinghe

The problems created by instability in Parliament and confusion in foreign relations were partially resolved by the appointment of Ranil Wickremseinghe as Prime Minister in place of Mahinda Rajapaksa. Although Wickremesinghe’s appointment was bitterly criticized for being the only member of his party in parliament, Wickremesinghe highlighted his good relations with the international community and donors.

The dispute in parliament over the content of the 21st Amendment (21A) aimed at reducing the powers of the executive president seems to end with the removal of one of the main obstacles. Basil Rajapaksa, a powerful member of the ruling Sri Lanka Podujana Peramuna Party (SLPP) and a dual citizen (US-Lanka), resigned on Thursday, abiding by a clause in Bill 21A which stated that dual citizens are not eligible to hold political office. . Once that issue is resolved and MPs agree to let the president retain the defense portfolio, 21A is expected to pass with the required two-thirds majority and without a referendum.

Given the informal agreement between President Gotabaya and Prime Minister Wickremesinghe to work harmoniously, the unfortunate history of Sri Lanka’s troubled diarchies will hopefully not be repeated. This will help the international community to trust the government of Lanka and accelerate its aid programs.

The likely appointment of leading entrepreneur Dhammika Perera to replace Basil Rajapaksa as the ruling SLPP MP will be welcomed by the business sector as well as the international community as he has released a detailed plan to improve Sri Lanka’s revenue. , sector by sector. . It could even be housed in cabinet in line with the president’s and prime minister’s penchant for involving subject matter experts in governance.

The Prime Minister held talks with IMF Managing Director Kristalina Georgieva to expedite the services-level agreement with Sri Lanka and extend the IMF facility by September. For its part, China said it is “ready to work with relevant countries and international financial institutions to continue to play a positive role in supporting Sri Lanka’s response to the current difficulties and efforts to alleviate debt burden and achieve sustainable development”.

Long way to go

While these developments are encouraging, Sri Lanka still has a long way to go before normalcy is restored. The prime minister has told parliament that Sri Lanka needs to find US$3.3 trillion for oil imports over the next six months. It would need US$250 million over the next six months to supply cooking gas. He warned that winding queues at petrol stations would continue for the next three weeks and called for fuel rationing through a coupon system.

Sri Lanka’s annual rice requirements are 2.5 million tonnes. But he only has 1.6 tons in stock. To overcome severe shortages in the coming months, Sri Lanka must import $150 million worth of rice each month. It would cost $600 million a year to import fertilizer. An improvement in the harvest situation is not expected until February 2023.

A recent study by the World Food Program (WFP) found that 73% of participating households had reduced their diet and food intake. Sri Lanka needs US$5 billion over the next six months to ensure daily life is not disrupted. Another billion US dollars is needed to strengthen the rupee. In total, the country needs 6 billion dollars, at least, for the next six months.

According to the Central Bank, average GDP growth in 2022 will be -3.5% but according to the International Monetary Fund, growth will be negative at 6.5%, partly due to the conflict in Ukraine. Recovery is only expected in 2024.

Sri Lanka’s foreign loans amount to $53 billion. Many loan installments received from multilateral institutions are due to be repaid this month. In fact, Sri Lanka has already defaulted and is seeking new repayment reschedulings.

Loss of income

The prime minister said the government lost LKR 6.6 billion ($18.3 million) in revenue with the abolition of a tax system introduced in 2019. Inflation rose with money printing . LKR 2.5 billion has been released into the economy from 2020 to May 20, 2022. There has been chronic mismanagement of finances by ministries. The government is unable to provide funds to cover the losses of any of the public enterprises.

Corrective actions

Regarding the proposed corrective measures, the Prime Minister said that with the help of the IMF, by 2024, Sri Lanka will have an economic recovery plan. By 2025, the budget could be balanced.

“We call on the International Monetary Fund to organize a conference to help unite our lending partners. The holding of such a conference under the leadership of India, China and Japan will be a great strength for our country. China and Japan have different credit approaches. We hope that consensus on lending approaches can be reached through such a conference,” the Prime Minister said.

Provisional budget

The interim budget will reduce unnecessary government spending, while controlling other costs, he said. On what is for the poor, Wickremesinghe said the annual expenditure to provide various reliefs to economically backward people will increase from $350 million to $550 million. Loans to farmers would be amortized at 100%. Loans obtained by farmers with less than two hectares of land will be stopped immediately.

Sherman Anderson: Correct the ‘Cottonwood’ decision | Columnists

June 12, 2022

Montana Economy

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SHERMAN ANDERSON

With an active wildfire season ahead, state and federal authorities are doing everything they can to protect our communities, wildlife, water resources and forests. One way to do this is to break the impasse in the management of federal forests and allow the implementation of wildfire mitigation projects. Montana senators can help by supporting legislation to correct the “Cottonwood” decision that blocks common sense management of national forests.

In recent years, lawsuits related to the Ninth Circuit’s Cottonwood decision have halted dozens of forest management projects in western Montana. The move created a new layer of government bureaucracy and red tape, necessitating further consultation among federal agencies on forest plans each time a new species is listed under the Endangered Species Act, qu critical habitat is identified or “new information” becomes available.

The decision created numerous anti-management lawsuits, adding years of delays to forest thinning projects that can help reduce the size and intensity of today’s wildfires. In an infamous example, the Cottonwood decision halted the Stonewall Vegetation Project in the Lewis and Clark National Forest. Litigation over the project was not resolved until the Park Creek and Arrastra fires burned unhealthy, overgrown forests that would have been proactively addressed.

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The Cottonwood decision has prevented our public land managers from looking after the land and ensuring that our national forests remain safe and accessible for all Montanese to enjoy. It has also blocked efforts to improve wildlife habitat and protect our watersheds and water supplies. Many of these projects were developed by local collaborations with diverse interests and had already undergone lengthy environmental reviews.

As our forests burn, the ruling has only served to add more duplicate paperwork to our flawed forest management system and added more costs to American taxpayers. It has also hurt our economy by costing family jobs in lumber. We simply cannot afford to lose our ability to manage forests and provide affordable Montana-made wood products.

Senator Steve Daines has tabled a bill that would allow public land managers and wildlife biologists to track the best available science for consultation. This would provide much-needed clarity in current regulations, so agencies can achieve their conservation goals rather than being stymied by anti-forestry lawsuits. The bill is supported by leading wildlife and outdoor conservation groups such as the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and the National Wild Turkey Federation.

There has been bipartisan support in the past to correct the Cottonwood decision and allow forest management projects to continue. This work began during the Obama administration, when President Obama’s Justice Department sought to overturn the Ninth Circuit’s decision all the way to the United States Supreme Court. While Republicans and Democrats in Congress — including Sen. Jon Tester — have backed legislation to address parts of the ruling, serial litigants are still using Cottonwood to block needed stumpage projects.

There is an urgent need to approve this new solution to the Cottonwood decision, but it is difficult for anything to pass in Congress these days. In a divided US Senate, Senator Jon Tester and Senator Steve Daines have an important opportunity to help advance a bipartisan solution through Congress. Time is running out for another active wildfire season. The time to act is now.

Sherman Anderson is the owner of Sun Mountain Lumber at Deer Lodge. His company is the largest private employer in Powell County and he is dedicated to keeping Montana’s forests healthy and resilient.